kierag
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what is the best way to water

I have a sprinkler that I water with. But I have had several people tell me that I need to just water inbetween the rows. I have had a couple of baby squash that were rotton looking on the ends and fell off when I touched them. Is this from to much wate?

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rainbowgardener
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Not necessarily too much water for the squash. Sounds like blossom end rot (type that into Search the Forum keyword box and find lots written here about it), which can be a reaction to a number of different kinds of stress.

But I agree about not sprinkling your plants. It wastes water and if you are in a humid climate it can spread fungal diseases. Put the water on the plant roots, where they need it.
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jal_ut
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I have heard this argued pro and con for years. For what is worth, I always sprinkle my garden. Our irrigation water comes in a pipe gravity fed and it has enough pressure to run rainbirds. It gets a 12 hour run once a week. That puts a little over an inch on the whole area. The system was developed for the whole town and you must sprinkle for any large area. You can use a garden hose on a small area, but I can't see doing that on my large area. I see no detrimental effects from sprinkling.

[url=https://donce.lofthouse.com/jamaica/sprinklers_1.jpg]Making it Rain[/url]
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

greenstubbs
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Not to Hijack but along the same lines. I thought about this a couple days ago. How do you people in the mid-west and southern states deal with plants getting wet when it rains? Things like squash, etc. must have a heck of a time in climates like that, I would think? It never rains in summer here and when I water, I soak the ground and not the plant. Discuss.

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rainbowgardener
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People that don't garden in raised beds for extra drainage have their plants drown/ rot and we fight fungal infections a lot! We have had a month of rain and lots of people's gardens are totally ruined and they are starting over.
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TWC015
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greenstubbs wrote:Not to Hijack but along the same lines. I thought about this a couple days ago. How do you people in the mid-west and southern states deal with plants getting wet when it rains? Things like squash, etc. must have a heck of a time in climates like that, I would think? It never rains in summer here and when I water, I soak the ground and not the plant. Discuss.
There's not much to do when it rains in the summer. Most of us in the south want it to rain because there is not enough rain in the summer.

I don't get the plant leaves wet when I water in the summer. I usually use a soaker hose. Since the humidity is around 100% for at least 12 hours every day in the summer, we try to keep the leaves dry to help keep fungal diseases away. The humidity does drop to 30-45% during the day, but from the evening until mid-morning, the humidity is high and the leaves get wet from the dew.

Humidity isn't a big problem in the other months. It gets lower during the day and there is a lot more wind to keep the plants dry. There is almost no wind during the summer here.

Squash and tomatoes, for me, are easy and difficult to grow. They are easy because they always grow great, but they are difficult because of the amount of problems each one has. Tomatoes get early blight, other fungal diseases, and nematodes. The squash plants get powdery mildew, squash vine borer, and squash bugs. The squash bugs are my archenemy in the garden.

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jal_ut
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I have a sprinkler that I water with. But I have had several people tell me that I need to just water inbetween the rows. I have had a couple of baby squash that were rotton looking on the ends and fell off when I touched them. Is this from to much wate?
If squash does not get pollinated, it does this. The little squash cannot develop without pollen, so it deteriorates and falls off.

I am hearing about a lot of problems down south that we don't have so much here with our cold winters and dry climate.

Every area has its problems. This morning my problem is an inch of snow. Things are not growing much with a temperature of 32°.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

Billed
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Hey,

I use soaker hoses. Last year I buried them along the rows then covered them with newspaper and leaf mulch after the plants were up. That was difficult and time consuming. This year I buried the hose as I planted, and now I'm beginning to add leaf mulch as the plants get large enough. This seems easier.
The soaker hoses make watering easier and save on water.

tedln
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I think metered drip irrigation at the base of each plant is the "best" method. It is for me however used only on container plants because it would be almost impossible to install in my garden for the in ground plants.

I use soaker hoses on a timer for my beds and it works great. I bury the hose just below the soil surface and set the timer to deliver the amount of water I want each day. Some plants like lettuce and radishes seem to like being seeded right on top of the hose. Other plants like tomatoes, carrots, and cucumbers prefer to be planted a few inches from the hose. They prefer moist soil rather than wet soil.

I don't use any kind of sprinkler because the plants stay wet and it induces fungus growth on the plants.

The problem you described is common for me early in the season because my young squash plants first produce female blooms (small squash attached) and no male blooms. Without pollination the bloom drops off, the tiny squash shrivels and eventually drops as well. It also happens when you have both male and female blooms, but no pollinators like bees. They then must be hand pollinated.

Ted
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