gardenbean
Senior Member
Posts: 251
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2011 12:47 am
Location: Westminster Colorado

What do you think?

I'm a newbie here as well as to hobby of gardening (which I am falling in love with) however my little garden spot (10ft x 16ft) doesn't have the best soil around. Yes, I did do a soil test and know what nutrients it will need.

So what I would like to know is, should one work more on getting their garden soil the best that it can be or should I put more of my effort into better vegetables?

The plants that I have decided to grow are peas, beans radishes, carrots, beets and cabbages, with the rest of the plants like peppers, tomatoes in containers.
Learning as I go and surprising myself when it all comes together......

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

gardenbean,

Warm welcome to HG. :D
So what I would like to know is, should one work more on getting their garden soil the best that it can be or should I put more of my effort into better vegetables?
I think they are hand and hand. Better soil will give you better, healthier, bug and disease resistant vegetables / plants.

Eric

cynthia_h
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7501
Joined: Tue May 06, 2008 11:02 pm
Location: El Cerrito, CA

Start your compost pile/bin/stack as soon as you can. The compost will feed the soil, which will feed your plants.

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

Des_WA
Full Member
Posts: 49
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 1:54 am
Location: Cascade foothills

Hi gardenbean,

I'm only on my second year of veggie gardening, though I've done a fair bit of container herb gardens in the past. My personal approach is a long-term one - I feel that by being a good steward of the land and soil, I will get better, happier plants and veggies. So I wouldn't recommend focusing all your attention on amending the crap (no pun intended :lol: ) out of your soil and neglecting planting anything in it - garden soil benefits from plants and their roots.

There's no instant solution that I know of, as things like tilth, nutrients, fungi, bacteria, and critters take time to develop, expand, grow, interact. From what I've read and learned this far, I feel that each year I responsibly tend the land I garden in and the plants I grow, and add the appropriate natural amendments when needed, the soil will become better, healthier, and more complex ecologically, and that in turn will make the plants in it better. Good things often take time and patience :D
Desiree
Gardening east of Seattle in the Cascade foothills

gardenbean
Senior Member
Posts: 251
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2011 12:47 am
Location: Westminster Colorado

You guys are great! And thank you for the hugs!! :) And I totally agree with what you all are saying.

Guess anyone cares here is what is going into this newbie's garden this year--(here goes)

Peas-because they add tons of nitrogen to the soil
Beans (wax, garden and roma II) No pole beans this year!
Radishes
Carrots (short and sweet)*because my soil is heavy and clay like
beets, all different flavors and shapes
onions- using the plants and not seeds (don't feel comfortable just yet in growing by seed)
Kolobori-they love going with my beets

Within these rows and areas I will hav various plants and herbs to use to keep away nasty pests. Marigolds and Nasturtiums of course and large sunflowers as my garden borders.

And in my containers I will have my tomatoes , squash and cucumbers.
Learning as I go and surprising myself when it all comes together......

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