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rainbowgardener
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I think most real soap is lye soap. It is fine. In the process of making the soap the lye, a base, is combined with acidic oils. The process neutralizes both of them and makes a new compound. So once the lye is saponified (made into soap), it does not exist as lye any more and the soap is not caustic.
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annastasia76
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as long as the lye soap works than I am fine with it, anybody know how much lye soap shavings to use in a gallon of water?? or is it similar to the liquid soaps. lye soap does not suds up like liquid soap does so I don't know if that would help or hinder.
Annastasia

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jal_ut
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In the dictionary sense of the word all soaps are detergents (cleansers) That is what the word means.

All soaps are surfactants, meaning they reduce the surface tension of water. This is the property that makes them useful in killing bugs.

The real problem is killing the bugs without hurting the plants. Whatever you use, I suggest you start out with a low dose and see if that will kill the pest in question. If it does, well and good. If not use a bit more and try again. For sure, the less soap we use the less likely we are to hurt the plants.

I keep a kitchen spray bottle in the garage to be used for washing out containers. The washing is done outside, but it is nice when you want a clean bucket to just have some soap handy. This bottle is also first defense against any earwigs that happen to come around the area. I use about two tablespoons Dawn in a kitchen spray bottle. This is heavy enough dose to have good cleaning ability and also knock earwigs right now. I do not use this bottle with that dosage on my plants though. A teaspoonful in a spray bottle seems to be strong enough to knock aphids.

The ideal amount is whatever it takes to get the bugs, but no more. Do some testing. Some plants are sensitive to soaps, so make a test first with a few leaves. If you find a sensitive plant, you may still be able to use soap, but come behind with some fresh water to wash it off. It only takes one minute or less for soap to kill bugs.

Once the soapy solution dries, it has no effect on the bugs. It gets the bugs you spray it on then its done. I feel good about using it because it won't poison the kids nor the pets.
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Joyfirst
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Doeas the soap help with ants too? I have soooo many ants and they nurture aphids too.

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applestar
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I use dr. Bronners peppermint soap solution strong enough to wash with (like jal's earwig spray) for ants that invade the kitchen. Instant death :twisted: Added benefit is the peppermint helps to disrupt their scent trai.

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JennieMig
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Ok guys, I have a broad mite problem on my green beans and was advised by my extension office to use insecticidal soap. I have read dawn works well, but some say Murphy''s oil soap is better. What do yall think?

I have to act on this ASAP. Since Saturday these mites have done a lot of damage and my blooms are falling off :cry:

WinglessAngel
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Deer and Pests :)

I have been told many a time by my ex fiance's southern grandmother and grandfather, to plant Rosemary hedges, not too expensive, alongside your gardens or interspersed at the edges of your garden. The deer do NOT like the smell and won't cross it nor eat it. A great way to have an excellent smelling fresh herb around and its great to cook pork and chicken with. Also i have seen on UTube a video of a guy who uses Ivory soap and jalapeno Juice mixed together to make an organic bug spray that he says is working great and is not bothering the plants or veggies one bit...he showed video feed of the plants he was spraying as he was also spraying them as well...seemed to be working for him :)

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Deer and Pests :)

WinglessAngel wrote:I have been told many a time by my ex fiance's southern grandmother and grandfather, to plant Rosemary hedges, not too expensive, alongside your gardens or interspersed at the edges of your garden.
In the south that would likely work, but you are in NE Ohio, so you know in your location like mine, if you planted a rosemary hedge, you would just have to dig the whole thing up and bring it in for the winter...
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WinglessAngel
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agreed rainbow, just a thought in case it might help someone else lol

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digitS'
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JennieMig wrote:Ok guys, I have a broad mite problem on my green beans and was advised by my extension office to use insecticidal soap. I have read dawn works well, but some say Murphy''s oil soap is better. What do yall think?

I have to act on this ASAP. Since Saturday these mites have done a lot of damage and my blooms are falling off :cry:
I don't know that you got an answer about what we think is the better choice for a soap spray, JennieMig. I use Safer's on the veggies.

On this thread, I believe that I said that I have used Palmolive Green 3 tablespoons/gallon water. I haven't used that on vegetables however. But on the less important sunflowers - actually, over a number of seasons. It works just fine at killing the aphids.

Yes, spider mites and beans go together, unfortunately.

Steve
Make everything as simple as possible but not simpler. ~ Albert Einstein

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jal_ut
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If you read this whole thread, you will get an idea of what people have used with good results. We didn't really arrive at a consensus of what is best. My advice is to try something. See what works for you. We learn to do by doing. Good luck.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

Tony02905
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I have never used insecticides, but there are several organic insecticide sprays on the market today. I have used the dishwashing soap / water mixture and have had some success. I have read and tried Nasturtiums as they tend to be a magnet for aphids, leaving my other plants alone. The trick is to blast them with either the garden hose or the soap/water mixture.

Any chance I get, I try to find and plop lady bugs into the garden as they are voracious eaters and love bad bugs..You can actually buy lady bugs over the net now.lol..lol..I am also toying with the idea of bringing other flowers into the veggie garden that attract good bugs, but just have to make sure they are compatible with the veggies I have.
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applestar
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Check out the [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=335]Beneficial Insects sticky[/url] in Organic Insect and Disease Control Forum for flowering plant ideas.

JMEAKE09
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insectisidal soap gone wrong...

HELP! We used a mixture of Dawn (the orange kind), a store bought insectisidal soap, and water (a mixture that was recommended and sworn upon by the man at the garden store) to get rid of Aphids on our pepper plants (they are potted, different varieties of bells and hot peppers)...We soaked them down, per his insturctions, two nights ago and today they are absolutely burned to bits. The plants seem ok, but leaves are all gone...Now I need help with damage control! I picked all the peppers that we had growing and tried to rinse off the plant as best I could to get the rest of the stuff off...is there anything else?? Will the fact that the soap rinsed into the soil be okay, or should I do an emergency repot into fresh soil?? Any quick help would be greatly appreciated!

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Kisal
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Most dishwashing liquids are strong detergents. They cut grease better than plain soaps. OTOH, they are much too strong for most plants, and can burn the leaves. In addition, the treatment should be applied when the plant is not in full sun, because the water droplets can act as little magnifying glasses. Ever start a fire as a kid, using a magnifying glass?

It sounds like you did everything right, but used the wrong products. I like Dr. Bronner's unscented liquid Castile soap for this purpose, but you can use Ivory or even Murphy's Oil Soap. You can even use a bar soap by shaving bits off and soaking them overnight in water. Just make sure it's a pure soap, like Castile or Ivory. I don't know that it would be a problem, but I wouldn't use something like Irish Spring or Dial. That's JMO, though, as I've never tried it. I did use Dawn the first time I made a soap solution to kill insects, and I burned all the leaves on one branch of the tree I was treating. I'm sorry it happened to you, as well. :(

I don't know alot about pepper plants, but do NOT put fertilizer on them or start to give them more water. That will only make matters worse. The plants won't have any use for extra food, so it will just sit in the soil and damage the roots. With no leaves to transpire moisture, extra water will just sit in the soil and rot the roots. I think just keeping them on the same schedule you had them on would be fine. Cut back on watering if the soil looks like it's staying wet longer than usual, and do not fertilize.

Best of luck to you! :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

JMEAKE09
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Thanks for your timely response! I notice now that the Dawn we used is concentrated and antibacterial...probably doesn't help....

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