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ozark_rocks
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Lima beans

I need suggestions for growing lima beans. I've tried bush and pole varieties, and never get any beans. I get beautiful plants , with lots of blooms, but they do not produce pods.

Is it the soil, or is it pollination? I don't have any trouble with pinto beans, or green beans, just the Lima's.

greenstubbs
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Last year I tried Fordhooks for the 1st time and had the same luck as you. For the price I paid for the seeds I only had about 30% germaniation from the whole pkg. For the amount of yield I got was a joke from the dozen or so plants I did grow. Pole beans aren't a problem for me, they do great. Needless to say I'm not doing anymore Lima's again. Good Luck

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ozark_rocks
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greenstubbs wrote:Last year I tried Fordhooks for the 1st time and had the same luck as you. For the price I paid for the seeds I only had about 30% germaniation from the whole pkg. For the amount of yield I got was a joke from the dozen or so plants I did grow. Pole beans aren't a problem for me, they do great. Needless to say I'm not doing anymore Lima's again. Good Luck
I have about 60 seed left over from last year, and might give it one more try, but haven't decided. I harvested maybe two shelled handfuls last year, like you say a joke. I just hate to give up on a veggie I like, but I also hate to give valuable garden space up for nothing.

greenstubbs
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ozark_rocks wrote:
greenstubbs wrote:Last year I tried Fordhooks for the 1st time and had the same luck as you. For the price I paid for the seeds I only had about 30% germaniation from the whole pkg. For the amount of yield I got was a joke from the dozen or so plants I did grow. Pole beans aren't a problem for me, they do great. Needless to say I'm not doing anymore Lima's again. Good Luck
I have about 60 seed left over from last year, and might give it one more try, but haven't decided. I harvested maybe two shelled handfuls last year, like you say a joke. I just hate to give up on a veggie I like, but I also hate to give valuable garden space up for nothing.
Oh I agree as I harvest more seeds than I bought and I like limas too. It may have been that it was a goofy weather year for me as everyone's everything didn't do great but for the trouble and effort I'm saying no this year. Besides it kinda of a PITA to clean out all the fencing at the end of the year, so I think I'll just do more green beans instead. You can find or try something else to fill the space that's void. Like I always say with gradening, "it's the grand experiment". Good Luck

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Gary350
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You need honey bees, butterflies, wasps, etc. to pollinate your blooms.

No polination no beans.

Beans are a 65 day crop.

garden5
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I've never tried limas....but I can't help thinking that I heard somewhere that they like it hot. Did you folks have a cool spell while you were sowing?
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ozark_rocks
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garden5 wrote:I've never tried limas....but I can't help thinking that I heard somewhere that they like it hot. Did you folks have a cool spell while you were sowing?
Last year was a really hot summer for us. Year before that was rainy and wet.

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farmerlon
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Around my place, we had an unusually hot Summer last year... so I blamed the pitiful performance of my Lima Beans on that.

I think Lima Beans like it warm... but not HOT. (I could be wrong.)
We had a record stretch of 95 to 100 degree days, and a lot of plants (including the Limas) didn't like that very much.

I will try again this year.

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GardenRN
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of course pollination is important. Does anyone else plant flowers in the garden to attract bees and other pollinators? This is the only reason I plant flowers! Mammoth sunflowers are good because they stand up tall (above my privacy fence) and can be "bee" seen from far away :) other flowers with a very showy or fragrant display are great for getting bees to the garden. My usual practice is sunflower (mammoth and a short variety), Sweet Peas (high scent), Zinnias (mixture of varieties) and marigold. There are always a bunch of bumble bees, honey bees, bee flies, butterflies, and dragonflies in the garden. Especially if you get out there just as the dew is burning off in the morning sun. :)
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How are those of you with lima issues feeding?

Could you not have the right [url=https://www.seedsofchange.com/garden_center/product_details.aspx?item_no=153800]mycorrhizae for the limas[/url]? All beans need rhizobium to fix nitrogen, and perhaps the big limas are more susceptible?

I'm guessing a bit, but hearing recurring problems like this and knowing this to be an issue in beans, I think it worth a try...

HG
Scott Reil

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ozark_rocks
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GardenRN wrote:of course pollination is important. Does anyone else plant flowers in the garden to attract bees and other pollinators? This is the only reason I plant flowers! Mammoth sunflowers are good because they stand up tall (above my privacy fence) and can be "bee" seen from far away :) other flowers with a very showy or fragrant display are great for getting bees to the garden. My usual practice is sunflower (mammoth and a short variety), Sweet Peas (high scent), Zinnias (mixture of varieties) and marigold. There are always a bunch of bumble bees, honey bees, bee flies, butterflies, and dragonflies in the garden. Especially if you get out there just as the dew is burning off in the morning sun. :)
I always have lots of flowers in the garden, including two rows just for sunflowers. I have mammoths, and different mixes of colored ones. I also plant zinnias, marigold, cosmos, and nasturtium to name a few... but I also have several patches of clover scattered around my yard (planted for the bees), that might draw them away from the garden.

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ozark_rocks
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The Helpful Gardener wrote:How are those of you with lima issues feeding?

Could you not have the right [url=https://www.seedsofchange.com/garden_center/product_details.aspx?item_no=153800]mycorrhizae for the limas[/url]? All beans need rhizobium to fix nitrogen, and perhaps the big limas are more susceptible?

I'm guessing a bit, but hearing recurring problems like this and knowing this to be an issue in beans, I think it worth a try...

HG
No, I have never used this, but is worth a try. :D Thank you for the suggestion.

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