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SPierce
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So I overwintered my brussels sprouts...

Please forgive the most likely duplicate topic- I googled and used the search on the forums, and had absolutely no luck in finding any information on this. Either I just was blind enough to miss it, or I didn't use the right search terms.

The snow finally melted enough this morning for me to take a look out back at my garden which was previously covered in about 4 feet of snow. I thought i'd take a chance, and overwintered both my BSprouts and my Strawberries. Lo and Behold, the BSprouts look green and seem to be in good shape. It isn't warm enough to put anything else in the ground yet, but.. well.. what do I do now? Do I cut off the tops and leave the roots in the ground, or do I leave them there and continue to let them grow? Do I do similar with the strawberries, and pick off the outer leaves so they can grow new ones from the roots?

Also, I will be picking up some compost and should obviously put it around my BSprouts and Strawberries as well... should i just out the compost on the surface, or try to mix it in with the dirt? I'm afraid of unintentionally messing up the root systems...

or should I just pull them up, and rotate them in the garden boxes- start new plants from seed?

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jal_ut
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The strawberries will do well. Yes some compost around them and remove any weeds. No need to worry about the dead leaves.

The sprouts will likely just want to bloom and go to seed. You can try growing them if you wish. I would start some new ones though.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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SPierce
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jal_ut wrote:The strawberries will do well. Yes some compost around them and remove any weeds. No need to worry about the dead leaves.

The sprouts will likely just want to bloom and go to seed. You can try growing them if you wish. I would start some new ones though.
Thank you very much! I planted too late last year, so none of them really produced anything, and I was unsure to what to do.

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applestar
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If you can catch them before they go to flower, you can harvest thumbnail sized sprouts. That's what I did last year and one of my daughters thought they were delicious. 8)

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SPierce
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applestar wrote:If you can catch them before they go to flower, you can harvest thumbnail sized sprouts. That's what I did last year and one of my daughters thought they were delicious. 8)
Ohh, thank you for this! :D They've got the smaller sprouts on them now, but never got bigger. I thought it a waste, but now that I know they'd be decent... i'll give them a munch!

I'm prepping my lettuces right now to go in the ground.. thinking of putting them in ground next week as long as it doesn't get too cold. I waited too late last year, too, and my lettuce just bolted and didn't go to head!

TWC015
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Like applestar said, you should get some edible sprouts off the plants before they flower. You will have to check them daily once they begin this years growth or the sprouts will grow too big quickly.

If you leave them in the ground to flower, they grow to 5-6 feet tall and have lots of yellow flowers. The flowers draw lots of bees. Each plant produces around 10,000 seeds.

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SPierce
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TWC015 wrote:Like applestar said, you should get some edible sprouts off the plants before they flower. You will have to check them daily once they begin this years growth or the sprouts will grow too big quickly.

If you leave them in the ground to flower, they grow to 5-6 feet tall and have lots of yellow flowers. The flowers draw lots of bees. Each plant produces around 10,000 seeds.
Thank you for this info, as well! I might just thin them out (i admittedly planted them too close together) and let them go to flower, if only to attract all the bees, which are good - cause I had issues with getting insects last year!

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