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Halfway
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Exotic Veggies for 2011

Any crazy experiments for 2011 in regards to varieties or veggies in general?

I am going to plant some varieties of Tepin peppers which I just stumbled upon a month ago. Hot little pea-sized peppers which taste incredible and lose the burn quickly.

What's your 2011 gamble? :shock:
Zone 4a.

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soil
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im growing the wild tepin peppers too. along with a relative to the common peppers called the rocoto tree pepper, supposed to be hardy to 25 or so.

i have more i just have to think whats rare for most people compared to me. ill add them as i remember.

japanese sweet potatoes
short grain brown rice
hops
Last edited by soil on Fri Dec 24, 2010 4:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

wordwiz
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I'll try to grow some stuff not normally seen in a garden in southern Ohio:
Barley
Wheat
Hops
Rice
Dandelions
Juniper Berries
Sorghum
Rye
Cotton (I need more balls to make a handkerchief)
Purple Sweet Potatoes

Dwarf fruit trees:
Cherry
Apple
Orange

Probably some other stuff.

Mike

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lorax
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I'm going to try things that don't normally grow at my rarified altitude -

Sweet Corn
Bananas
Papaya
Certain heriloom sandwich tomatoes
Hops

- wordwiz, are you starting hops from rootstock or from seed? If it's seed, you should be starting now in a pot at the back of the fridge....

The big gamble are the bananas, since everybody I've talked to seems to think it's impossible.

Nothing "exotic" since what y'all would consider under that clause are actually the native veggies and fruits here (Tamarillo, Naranjilla, Chirimoya, Guabo {Ice-Cream Bean} etc. etc. etc.)

wordwiz
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Lorax,

A bit of an explanation. The county fair tries to encourage groups or individuals to adopt a spot and plant a garden that will be in full bloom during the fair (second week of August). Last year I built a raised bed (4x40) and planted about 30 types of plants, with some plants having 2-3 different varieties. It was built on a parking lot; it had to have a theme that tied into Hamilton County, so it became the Garden of Eden Park(ing) Lot, as there is a place called Eden Park in the county.

This year, it is going to be a Beer (and other beverages) Garden. My dwarf fruit trees will be in containers, either dirt or hydro, the others in the soil. I plan on finding a smallish, dead tree and hang beer and pop cans on it and hopefully build a still - and tell the sheriff it's not in production!

Thanks for the tips on the hops - I had no clue.

Mike

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farmerlon
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I found an old (government published) Tennessee Victory Garden booklet from 1943. It has a big chart of recommended vegetable varieties.
Since I like heirlooms anyway, I thought it would be fun to grow any of the varieties that I can find from that (nearly 70 year old) list.
This won't be my main garden, just a fun "side project".

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lorax
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Mike, hops are famously recalcitrant from seed. I've currently got one vine from about 50 fairly fresh seeds sewn, and those were cold-stratified in the freezer for 6 months, then popped into soil at the back of the fridge for another 4-5 months. It's a wicked fast grower, though, once it's up. I'm praying that it's a female plant, now - because I really am growing it for brewing.

If I were you and I really wanted nice, established hops for the Beer (and other beverages) Garden, I'd be looking out for rhizomes. If I recall correctly, there are some commercial hopperies out near Cleveland, and you may be able to get some stock from them - otherwise, [url=https://www.mcfayden.com/product_detail.aspx?pid=1578]McFayden[/url] of Canada usually has quite nice rootstock (although they sell hops as an ornamental!)

wordwiz
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Lorax,

Congrats on the 500th post!

How big of a container would I need to grow a plant in? My raised bed is about 8' from a building - a tall building! I could run rope from the top of the side of it to the raised bed and it would probably be a good 20' if not 30. If I could use a Sterilite container or such, I can bury it in the raised bed (making it look like it is part of the garden) and then after the fair and harvest season, bring it to my home and continue growing them. The demo at the fairgrounds is a one-year thing.

Mike

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I haven't really been researching many crops yet, but I do know that I'd like to give sweet potatoes a try and maybe some of the new world's hottest pepper variety if I can get my hands on some seed.
There's something new growing in the Helpful Gardener Forum! Become a part of it here!

wordwiz
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Before anyone rushes to e-bay or some other place to buy the Naga Viper or Naga Hari seeds, please keep in mind that the Scoville testing is suspect and the plants are hybrids. More than likely, you will be buying seeds from a first generation plant and may end up with nothing but a hab or worse. If you really want to spend a buck or two per seeds, I have these bean seeds, said to grow plants that people named Jack can climb!

Mike

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lorax
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Mike, you can probably use about 5-7 gallons for hops, and they'll be thrilled by all the space - that way you should get nice, vigorous bines and lots of cones.

I'd reccomend pea netting or a trellis, though, rather than a rope - you'll get a nicer display that way since you won't be dealing with just a single bine, but a crowded mass of foliage and flowers. You can train the bine to wander in the trellis, as well.

wordwiz
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Lorax,

Thanks for this tip also! I found a couple of places on-line that sells the netting rather cheaply and I can use it for my peas and green beans as well. A 50' section is about $17; the 20' length is $9.

Putting on my dream cap, I can see having a 150' section of a piece of ground set aside for Sugar Snap Peas and Pole Beans. Two crops of peas, one of the beans. A guy in GardenWeb suggested the idea of growing 2-3 crops in the same area in one season to maximize my output. It makes sense (and dollars!) and I've been giving it a lot more thought. I want to have some very early tomatoes so I'm looking at the Agribon Row covers that should allow me to transplant early toms about the third or last week of April. But a month before that, I can plant lettuce in the row, one plant per two feet. Then transplant the toms between them. The lettuce will be done by the middle of June, about the same time the toms will be getting large enough to need the room. Once the toms are done, resow lettuce. I won't be able to turn 16,000-17,000 square feet into an acre, but I should get about 3/5 of an acre out of it.

On a side note - I'm trying to grow a Dwarf Cavendish in a DWC hydro system. It started out gang-busters but has slowed tremendously and the outer edges of the leaves are turning yellow. It's just an experiment - I have a 125-watt LED panel providing the light. It has massive roots. Hopefully, it is just going through its slow phase. I transplanted it at the end of September.

I would like to learn how to germinate banana seeds. I have tried just about every way possible - freezing them, sticking them in a humidifier, paper towels, rockwool, potting mix, Oasis Horticubes, with lights, without lights! Would you believe two out of probably 300 seeds have actually germinated!

Mike

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lorax
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If your DCav is yellowing, there are two issues: one is light (DCs love to have high light levels), and the other is Nitrogen. Bananas are extremely hungry creatures, and it's a good idea to fertilize weekly with a medium N to high PK ratio and a good balance of trace minerals (in particular, Manganese, which bananas are heavier on than most other plants.) The roots are definitely going to be absolutely gigantic - in soil as in hydro, the plant builds a really large corm to support the current fruiting plant (the mother) as well as the offshoots (pups).

Banana seeds are easy! Suck on them for 5 minutes or so (the amylase in your saliva helps to activate them - seeded bananas are peculiarly adapted to being eaten, then passed), then soak them in water with 2-3 drops of hydrogen peroxide for 24-48 hours. Discard anything that floats - it's bad seed. Then seal them in ziplock baggies with no medium at all, just a squirt of water, and throw them on your heat mat or at the back of your fridge on the top. Check them weekly for sprouts (the water will turn brown, but don't be alarmed by that) and to make sure they don't dry out. Light doesn't seem to be a factor.

For all but the rarest types, you'll get about 80% germination this way in 3-6 weeks. Transplant them when the tap root is well developed. I'll take a look - I think that No. 1 of the current volume of Bananas Quarterly has an article on it with good photos of how the seeds should look at each step of the process. I'll do some page captures and post them later.

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lorax
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OK, found the germination guide.

[img]https://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh196/HabloPorArboles/Bananas/Vol2No1/Germination.jpg[/img]

wordwiz
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Lorax,

Thanks for the guide. Maybe I have not been giving them enough time, though last winter they probably had close to three months (in potting mix, though).

I have a few seeds left, I might as well try this method.

Mike

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Nothing exotic for me this year. But I will be growing beets for the first time. The swiss chard does so well, might as well try the nearest relative. I'm also going to grow a lot more pepper plants, and put them in among my strawberries and flower beds. I want to try to make my own hot sauce and chili powder. Yum!

Farmer Bob
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Exotic vegs

Hi Folks,
Very interesting to read of all the diff vegs u're all experimenting with. I'm in Cape Town, South Africa where it's much warmer here. We're in the middle of summer and I experimented with water spinach ( ong choy) Ipomoea aquatica, Watercress and Tamarillo ( Solarium betaceum) , the Tree tomato.
Have lotsa fun and wishing u much success with your new vegs .! :D [/list]

ruggr10
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trying these unusual edibles in 2011

I haven't decided what cool new things to try in the veggie garden yet, but I do have some new cool things to do. I'm up in Maine and I'd love to hear any ideas from you guys.

4 types of honeyberries (I've never eaten one!)
2 types of elderberries
pink champagne blueberry
bush cherries

may go with goumi berries, saskatoon berries, and hardy kiwi.

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applestar
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I didn't get to try it last spring, so I'm again going to be on the lookout for fresh water chestnuts at the Asian market to try to grow in the little rice paddy or bog garden, though I may also look for actual nursery stock. I'm thinking of growing Hmong Sticky rice instead of Koshihikari this year. :()

Two other exotics on my list are Japanese wasabi -- found sources last year but gave up as too expensive -- maybe I'll consider it again. If I get set up to grow wasabi, then I'll definitely also grow watercress. And Biwa fruit (I just drew a blank on it's common name ... Starts with a "L" I think -- oh yeah Loquat.) :D The fruits should be available at the Asian market, if at all, in March, same as Water Chestnuts. I want to try planting the seeds. 8)

I have regular chestnuts from the supermarket that may be sprouting -- some are planted indoors and some are in moist compost/sand mix in a hopefully protected area in the garage. I'm also trying to grow Sansho from seed. Other on-going projects too that I've mentioned elsewhere. :wink:

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Hi applestar.

U've got some interesting oriental stuff going or in plan for your garden.!
I planted some Japanese mustard cabbage ( very much like Kei choy - Chinese mustard cabbage ) but only red in colour and oh so hot.! Quite inedible for me , even as a hot pepper fan. !

Incidently, I just recently got a cutting of a Goji Berry bush (Wolf Berry), which very pleasingly has rooted and shows healthy life.!I don't know how long it will take to bear fruit.

My cherimoya tree has blossomed since Nov and I've been hand pollinating, pleased to see fruit development. I had 50 odd fruit last year, which friends and family enjoyed. They are quite rare in South Africa and the recently $ 6.5 per pound. Quite a luxury.! Nice when it's free from one's garden even tho the hand pollinating is quite time consuming and going up and down ladders.! :D

Regds,
Farmer Bob

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lorax
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Tree Tomatoes

Farmer Bob, what are your opinions on Tree Tomato? Are you treating them as annuals or as perennials?

Canadian Farmer Guy
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Unusual stuff for my area?

Okra, kohlrabi, tomatillos... I think that's all.

CFG

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ThePepperSeed
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Re: Exotic Veggies for 2011

Halfway wrote:Any crazy experiments for 2011 in regards to varieties or veggies in general?
I'm trying to grow a 7 pod brain strain pepper in a 5 gallon dwc bucket. First time growing the pepper and using dwc. Should be interesting...

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Halfway
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Re: Exotic Veggies for 2011

ThePepperSeed wrote:
Halfway wrote:Any crazy experiments for 2011 in regards to varieties or veggies in general?
I'm trying to grow a 7 pod brain strain pepper in a 5 gallon dwc bucket. First time growing the pepper and using dwc. Should be interesting...
It does sound interesting. Can you explain the peppers a bit?
Zone 4a.

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ThePepperSeed
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Re: Exotic Veggies for 2011

Halfway wrote:It does sound interesting. Can you explain the peppers a bit?
This is my first time growing it, I just received the seeds this past summer. I've grown super hots for the past 3 years just not this particular strain. This guy goes into a lot of detail on the taste/heat -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_lrtAkDqK0

so do these guys

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=37FekjT1bKw

I started my seed in early Nov and just started a grow log for it here -

https://thepepperseed.com/growing-peppers/7-pod-brain-strain-in-dwc/

Should be fun! :D
Last edited by ThePepperSeed on Sun Jan 02, 2011 3:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Farmer Bob
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Hi lorax,

It's my first time attempt at tamarillo, and as South Africa is quite a warm country and we do not experience frost in Cape Town, I guess the tamarillo will be treated as perrenial .

My cherimoya tree loses it's leaves for just about 2 weeks in late spring and then grow new leaves and branches soon thereafter, with an abundance of flowers preceding the new foliation. It's been great hand pollinating, but hard work. The reward is the delicious fruit which takes about 5-6 months to reach full maturation.

I do mainly container gardening, as I have a very small area to grow veg and fruit. We live in the suburbs and the plots are small. Compared to most of you, your gardens are like small to large holdings.! What a dream it would be for me.!

Lotsa success for 2011.!

Farmer Bob

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lorax
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HA! Bob, I garden on about 10 square meters of dirt, fully half of which is given over to the hothouse and bananas!

Tamarillo / Tomate de Arbol are perennials here in their native range - they won't actually start blooming until the second season anyhow, once the plants have broken apical dominance. Then they'll keep fruiting a full 5 years or so, unless they get frost or they're blown over in strong wind.

The Cherimoya leaf-drop cycle is perfectly natural - they do it here, too. They're one of my fave fruits, hands-down. Are you growing a variety with dimpled scales, or protruding ones? And have you ever tried just cutting the fruits in quarters and sticking them in the freezer for about 20-30 minutes? Instant ice cream!

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Halfway
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Re: Exotic Veggies for 2011

ThePepperSeed wrote:
Halfway wrote:It does sound interesting. Can you explain the peppers a bit?
This is my first time growing it, I just received the seeds this past summer. I've grown super hots for the past 3 years just not this particular strain. This guy goes into a lot of detail on the taste/heat -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_lrtAkDqK0

so do these guys

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=37FekjT1bKw

I started my seed in early Nov and just started a grow log for it here -

https://thepepperseed.com/peppers/growing-peppers/7-pod-brain-strain-in-dwc/

Should be fun! :D
Great website and love the pics. Red Savinas? Oh baby!
Last edited by Halfway on Sat Jan 01, 2011 10:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Zone 4a.

Farmer Bob
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Hi lorax,
Well, I have patience for certain things. So if I could wait for 8 years for fruit from my cherimoya, I guess I can wait 2 years for the tamarillo.!

I don't have the protruding type of cherimoya. I grew it from a seed of a fruit I bought whilst in London. Now I have seeds for Africa ( excuse the pun) and wish we had a garden forum here in South Africa where we could swop seeds and exchange ideas and share experience.

I find this forum such a pleasure , but when it's summer here in South Africa, it's winter in the states.............so I am never in sync with everyone else's converstation.! or gardening plans for the season.!

I have a few papaya busy ripening in my garden and it'll be interesting to see the outcome. Never grown it b4. The plant came out of my compost heap.

Take care

Regds,
Bob

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lorax
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No worries - it's almost always summer for me, and what you're growing happens to be native crops from my neck of the woods.

It should only be 1 year on the Tamarillos before they start fruiting, not two - sorry for the confusion. A "cycle" or "season" for me is a roughly 6 month period, which corresponds generally to my greater arc of wet and dry seasons. For example, I grow half-season tomatoes (from Canada!), as well as the more traditional 2-cycle hard corn. I keep forgetting that almost everybody else I talk to on these forums is dealing with hard (ie frosty) winters. :()

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