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Halfway
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Tepin Peppers Wow!

The local hydro dealer has a thickly stalked pepper plant in a grow hut display model which started a conversation.

I noticed it was a pepper plant, but had never seen these "berries. It turns out they are Tepin pepper. Google it to see photos if you have never seen them. This bush has a 1 inch stalk and is literally covered in berries and flowers.

In response to Applestars question on "perennial peppers", the hydro guy said this was the 3rd year of owning the Tepin and the fruiting cycle was very interesting. They do not force flowering, it occurs naturally without any changes to lighting, humidity, or temp. It runs a full cycle of flower, flower and fruit, and then just fruit. It will immediately flower once the fruit are all dropped in the current cycle.

He offered and I tried a couple. WOW! Instant flavor and heat. The flavor is exceptional and not over "burned" as are some habs and bonnets. The interesting part is the heat dissipates within about a minute to a mellow spice.

I fell in love. We put a 1/4 in a large batch of chili last night and it really added some great flavor. The pick up in heat was great too.

I am going to save the remainder for seed and can see at least one of these plants becoming a member of the family.

8)

Edit: Couple notes since I posted this thread. Many google searches have tag lines such as "worlds hottest" or something of that nature. This is not true, but an eye catcher only. The heat is no where near as fierce as a hab and absolutely no comparison with a julokia. I would rate the heat with a seranno or very hot jalapeno, but nothing close to bonnets / habs.

On the lifespan............."For gardeners, the Tepín is a small perennial bush that can live for several years, needing some warmth year-round. In cold climates they can be grown in a container and brought indoors in the winter, and then put outside when the nights are above 50°F. in spring. Tepín is a desert plant, so sprouting seeds need a little help. " Tepín peppers have to be tricked into thinking they're in the desert," she says"
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The Helpful Gardener
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Closely related to pequins, I believe (which I just tried again the other day, and while not the hottest, are not for the faint of heart). The African version of your pepper has been noted for extreme heat, but any pepper can vary it's torch with soil and weather conditons and terroire.

I was visiting my friend Jeremy, a grower at a place with a varied Latin and Hispanic community. The collection of peppers they have is widely diverse and encompassing a number of cultures. There are Bhut Jolokai, Scorpions from the Carribean, and pequins from Mexico (the plant is in a fifteen gallon container, four years old, and a shrub at this point) among others.

I found a new one I have never seen that the Mexican lady who introduced it called "Verzano", but can't find info. Lemony yellow, about the size of a persimmon, and while the first one or two can be mild and sweet, when you get to a hot one it is deadly.

Best of all, I have aquired seeds for all these, including the one that has started interbreeding (clearly part scorpion, but who knows what else?) That Jeremy...

HG
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soil
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im going to grow about 20 of these next year, they are great.
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

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Halfway
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I have some red savina's as well. Crushing heat!

I noticed my serrano this year had wild swings of heat. This was tru in the same plant. Eat 2, life is good, eat the 3rd and run to the gallon of milk!!

It was difficult in adding them to the canned salsa because you could not accurately predict the heat. Fun to grow and fun to eat though!!!
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garden5
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I grew the jolokia this year and while the fruit got hit by the frost and rotted, I did get a chance to try a piece of one. WOW! a 1/4 in. square piece from the bottom of the pepper, started burning as soon as it hit my tongue and kept my mouth warm for about 10 min......definitely growing them again next year.

I saved seed from 2 peppers (all I had), so I'm hoping at least one did not cross-pollinate.

If you think the tepins are neat, check out Hot Marbles.

[img]https://www.chileseeds.co.uk/images/hot_ch58.jpg[/img]

I haven't tried any, but they are supposedly pretty hot and they go through various color phases. Definitely a good fit in the ornamental category as well as the palatable.
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applestar
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Halfway -- sorry, I lost sight of this thread after you referenced it in the other thread and never got a chance to respond. Glad G5 bumped it.

I grew some hot peppers from a 10+ yr old souvenir hot pepper mix of seeds from Arizona, and Tepin was supposed to be one of them. According to the packet's seed description to ID which seed is which, I *should* have sowed some Tepins as well but what I though was Tepin turned out to be an Anaheim (must have been some runt seeds). I still have the packet with the smaller/less "good looking" seeds in there, so maybe I still have a few Tepin seeds. I'll try again in spring. Your description sounds intriguing. 8)

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Halfway
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No worries applestar! Get ya some of the Tepins!!

And G5....thanks for the pic and the pepper (hot marbles). Those are going on the shopping list!!
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