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Avonnow
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Pepper Plant possible problem

I have hopefully put two photos here for you to see, I want to k now if anybody knows why these peppers have these lines on them. They look like zippers to me, brown zippers that run along the sides, is this a deficiency or something else. Some of my peppers have no problems and other have this. :shock:

[img]http://i218.photobucket.com/albums/cc119/Avonnow/IMG_0289.jpg[/img]

[img]http://i218.photobucket.com/albums/cc119/Avonnow/IMG_0291.jpg[/img]

These are two totally different plants, and the one I picked is worse - I am not sure if I am doing something wrong, or they need something Thanks in advance. I really appreciate the help.
:D
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lorax
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Totally normal and nothing to worry about, really. I've noticed it on mine when I've got periods of really hot, dry weather followed by torrential rains, and the sweet peppers seem more susceptible than the hots. It's cosmetic.

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Avonnow
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Picked some

I did pick some, and they were fine tasting - I though maybe I was doing something wrong or missing a element I needed. Thanks I will let them grow. I guess I need to realize without chemicals they are not going to look like the store bought peppers all the time. Live and Learn.
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stella1751
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lorax wrote:Totally normal and nothing to worry about, really. I've noticed it on mine when I've got periods of really hot, dry weather followed by torrential rains, and the sweet peppers seem more susceptible than the hots. It's cosmetic.
That's interesting, Lorax! I'll bet it's the pepper version of the cracking you see on tomatoes. I always figured it was caused by some kind of trauma, but I wasn't certain what. Thanks!
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garden5
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Yep, you should be fine. I looks like it's got something to do with the heat.

Store produce is often "perfect," but real organic vegetables often aren't. Although the storeboughts SOMETIMES have us beat with taste, we certainly win out with flavor :wink: :).
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TZ -OH6
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Zippering is fairly common on tomatoes too. If my memory serves, it is from flower parts sticking during fruit expansion. Commercial produce has an army of people removing anything that is not perfect so most people never get to see what the real thing looks like.

The Helpful Gardener
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Thrips can be part of that flower not unfurling thing and misshapen flowers lead to misshapen fruit. Steinernema feltiae is a good warm weather nematode that is showing good effect against thrip, both in foliar and soil drench application. Plus they tear up fungus gnats and shoreflies, and most soil borne grubs (but not earthworms). An application right around flowering time next year might help, and certainly can't hurt. Drench plant and soil, but after sunset or on a rainy day; todes fry like eggs otherwise...

HG
Last edited by The Helpful Gardener on Fri Nov 12, 2010 12:36 am, edited 1 time in total.
Scott Reil

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Avonnow
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Thrips

I am going to sound stupid, but your whole post was enlightening - I have no idea what your talking about or the neamatode thing. I plan to read up on it tonight. Learn something everyday. I hope you realize I am not being sarcastic, I just read the post and everything in it was something I never heard before. Thank You alot!
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Sherry, I know pros that don't know nematodes, or if they do they only know the pathogenic ones (bad guys) that hurt plants...

SF is a good strain we use in the greenhouse industry or warm climates to eat a number of different bugs, including thrips, which can deform flowers. They can be an issue on peppers; there is even a [url=http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/in/in63800.pdf]specific Chili Thrip[/url] that is prevalent down south...

Nematodes are WAY better than pesticides because they get the larval stage down in the soil, but less effective on adult populations. Hitting them with a spray (I like pyrethrin for this) followed in a day or two by the 'todes will give you a good complete treatment...

HG
Scott Reil

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