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jal_ut
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Now That's A Turnip

[img]https://donce.lofthouse.com/jamaica/big_turnip.jpg[/img]
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

Canadian Farmer Guy
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:shock: You never cease to amaze me.

What will you do with it?

CFG

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Avonnow
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WOW

I really don't know what to say - check with Guiness that could be a record, unbelievable. :wink:
I love this! - There can be no other occupation like gardening in which, if you were to creep up behind someone at their work, you would find them smiling.

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Francis Barnswallow
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How long did that take to grow?

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lakngulf
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Are you growing on a site that was an ancient nuclear plant? Wow, that is some turnip.
Nutin as good as a kitchen sink mater sammich

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Gary350
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I think that will feed about half a dozen people.

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jal_ut
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This turnip was planted from seed in April. It was in the ground about six months. I did thin my turnips well in the spring, so it had room to grow. I had no idea they would get so large. I have grown turnips for years, but never had anything like this. I think it was giving it the room to grow that made the difference. Here is a pic when they were growing. Look at the size of those leaves.

[img]https://donce.lofthouse.com/jamaica/turnip_7_4_2010.jpg[/img]
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

garden5
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Wow, Jal, now that's some turnip! It almost looks like 3 that were fused together.

It doesn't surprise, though, now that I see those lush greens.

My beets didn't get as large as I had hoped they would this year and I think it's largely from the deer eating the leaves. They were a good size and I'm happy with them, I was just expecting the Lutz variety to be a little larger then the others.
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DeborahL
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Did you eat it? How was it?
God must think highly of animals - He created them before creating us !

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jal_ut
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I am not going to eat it. I can't imagine it being any good. I have some nice young ones to eat. Turnips are a good fall crop.

[img]https://donce.lofthouse.com/jamaica/turnips.jpg[/img]
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

DeborahL
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It would have been tough and woody tasting? I once grew those long white radishes, and they tasted bland and woody even when small.
Back to Cherry Belles I went !
God must think highly of animals - He created them before creating us !

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applestar
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Do you give something like that to the animals --or would you if you had them? What kind of animal would eat one? They sell shredded dehydrated beet pulp for horses don't they? ...but his is a turnip.... just curious :?:

ACW
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Sheep, cows and pigs are happy to be fed turnip,happens a lot in Scotland through the winter.
I often see them in the fields when I go North for some February salmon fishing .
A gardener with a small shady back garden and a balcony with containers ,
biggest problem not enough sunshine !

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lorax
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About the only thing a neep that big is good for is carving a halloween lantern...

AS, Goats love turnips, both the greens and the root.

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applestar
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Thanks! Now if I ever have a little farm... 8) I keep thinking maybe I could "innocently" start trucking in Quails, Bantams, Pygmy Goats, and Mini Pigs, Donkeys and Horses... :lol: Do you think my neighbors would notice? :> :kidding:

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When you say that a turnip is good for a fall crop, are you saying one planted in spring matures in fall or that you plant in summer for fall maturity?

How do turnips grow; underground like radishes?
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lorax
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Plant in summer for fall maturity is how I have always grown neeps - and yes, they're a root crop, like beets or radishes. Neeps-a-mashie is one of my favourite fall side-dishes.

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gixxerific
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Awesome and as usual James you came up with some off the wall size veggie yet again. Keep it up. :D

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