tedln
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Location: North Texas

I hope they made that reservation through priceline and paid for it with paypal. Can't be to careful these days. I haven't had any experience with them in cooler weather after they started producing. My guess is they will do fine until first frost. In New Orleans, that may be Mardi Gras weekend.

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

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jal_ut
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Location: Northern Utah Zone 5

"JAL, can the Armenians be sown early like regular cukes?"

In my climate I sow pumpkins and winter squash May 5, Melons May 15, and cukes June 1. I sow Armenians May 15 with the melons. (If the soil and weather cooperate.)

May 18 is the average last frost, so that gives you something to shoot for.

Instead of Straight Eight cukes, I find Marketmore 76 to be a much better cuke. They seldom get bitter here. I think it is stress that makes cukes bitter. Try to keep the soil damp. I think drought stress, and/or excessive heat are the most common stress elements for cukes.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

tedln
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Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2009 10:06 pm
Location: North Texas

Jal,

What do your Armenians look like when harvested?

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

tedln
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Posts: 2178
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2009 10:06 pm
Location: North Texas

The Armenians are doing well on the A frame trellis, but I started thinking about transferring the plants to the compost pile today. My fall planted Sweet Success cukes are producing great and should continue until the first frost. I grow one or two things every year that I've never grown before and I may find interesting. Sometimes my test crop will be a total failure or a medium to great success. I have found the Armenians to be a good success. They are interesting, productive, and tasty and well worth growing. I doubt if I will plant them again next year because I am thinking about trying some cantaloupe next year on the A frame trellis. I guess I am just ready to rework that bed and get my new watering system hooked up to it. All my other beds are growing a fall crop after having been reworked with more soil and compost added. I will probably plant some Romaine lettuce in the bed after it is reworked. I found out last year I can plant the Romaine in the fall and it will germinate and grow two or three inches. It then spends the winter under an occasional snow or just freezing weather. When spring arrives the next year, it grows quickly and we have good lettuce until it bolts in late spring.

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

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