garden5
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So you say that these giant peppers produced at the same rate as you normal sized ones? Well, I'll definitely have to put some of those on the list for next year. :wink:.
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garden5,

Mine did. It has been a few years since I grew them, but the plant was larger and the peppers were larger and they all grew to produce-able size at the same time.

I like applestars rock idea. My pepper plants (except the bells) have always grown so tall, that if I didn't support them; they would simply topple over. In years past, I would drive a stake in the ground and tie them to the stake. As they produced new branches, I would pull all the branches into a tight bundle and tie the bundle to the stake. This year, I tried the small tomato cages, but my plants have way outgrown the cages. Since they always topple right at ground level, I wonder how it would work to simply prop them up with big rocks right at ground level. It has always worked well with my squash.

The wife and I went into town to our favorite Mexican restaurant last night. When we returned, we found the aftermath of a pretty windy thunderstorm. All my new squash plants were laying on their sides but my peppers in their cages seemed okay.

Ted
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tedln wrote:I'm curious. How do you use a "lot" of jalapenos? We need to trade places. I use some jalapenos and grow more than I can use. You use a lot and can't grow enough. Do you use them for seasoning, eat raw, make a vegetable course out of them?

Ted
Ted, check the recipes forum. I posted a recipe for Pickled Jalapeno Relish that I've been doing this year. I did another batch last week and gave some to my father for his birthday. I remember when we used to go to El Chico when I was a kid, he'd always ask for "relish". He loved it. I found that recipe poking around and have done two full batches this year. The first was two quarts, the second was 6 pint jars. I have a bit left of the second quart and I gave away the 6 pints. Everyone is loving them and asking for more. Luckily my jalapeno's are doing well this year.

As for larger jalapeno's, I've got a Macho Nacho plant growing next to the jalapeno. It's supposed to put out 5-6" jalapenos. I haven't gotten any peppers of it yet, but there are new blooms all over. I'm betting it takes off if/when the temp breaks a little.

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jmoore,

Where did you get the macho nacho plant or seed? I along with a few others want to try them next year. I will bet you a buck that "macho nacho" is simply the Burpee Gigante seed purchased and resold under a new name?

I will try the relish.

Thanks

Ted
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tedln wrote:jmoore,

Where did you get the macho nacho plant or seed? I along with a few others want to try them next year. I will bet you a buck that "macho nacho" is simply the Burpee Gigante seed purchased and resold under a new name?

I will try the relish.

Thanks

Ted
I bought it as a plant from Home Depot. It's a Burpee plant that are ubiquitous at HD and Lowes in the spring. It may well be a renamed Gigante.

The relish is great. Def. worth trying a batch.

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Thanks jmoore.

I was at Lowes and Home Depot today. My wife browses at ladies stores. I browse at Lowes and Home Depot. They only had a few plants still alive and they were in horrible condition. They said they should be getting some fall plants in soon.

Stella, Just to make you jealous; I ate a really good Chile Rellano at my second favorite Mexican restaurant for lunch today. MMMMMnnnn Good.

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tedln wrote: Stella, Just to make you jealous; I ate a really good Chile Rellano at my second favorite Mexican restaurant for lunch today. MMMMMnnnn Good.

Ted
There's an evil streak in you, Ted. You're gonna want to watch out for that :-)

There is one fantastic true Mom 'n Pop Mexican restaurant in Wyoming. Unfortunately, it is in Cheyenne, roughly 200 miles away. If I want Chile Rellenos, I have to make them myself. I haven't had them since my Poblano year, two years ago. Ah. The memories.

Next year, I will try to make some from my 6" Jalapenos. I wonder whether I should grow some Anaheims as a back-up plan? Now you have me seriously wanting Chile Rellenos!

I have some Nu-Mex Big Jims this year. They're long enough, but I think it would be a waste of time to try to stuff them. I wonder what people use them for? Poppers?
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stella1751 wrote: Next year, I will try to make some from my 6" Jalapenos. I wonder whether I should grow some Anaheims as a back-up plan? Now you have me seriously wanting Chile Rellenos!

I have some Nu-Mex Big Jims this year. They're long enough, but I think it would be a waste of time to try to stuff them. I wonder what people use them for? Poppers?
I went online to answer my own question about these Numex's and found that these [url=https://www.thechileman.org/results.php?chile=1&find=numex&heat=Any&origin=Any&genus=Any]Big Jims[/url]are ideally suited to making Chile Rellenos. Duh. They are such odd peppers, 7 to 8" long and curving all over the place because the first batch started when the plant was only 6" tall.

Sheeshshe, I don't know yet what kind of flavor these have, but they're supposed to be hot, and these plants really produce. One of these super long peppers is the equivalent of three or four jalapenos. The literature says they'll go up a foot long. You might consider them for your salsa next year; three or four of these would make a lot of salsa!
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big jims? yes?

I need to start writing down all the varieties that I want to plant next year!!! if I don't I won't remember when it is time to order seeds in the spring! LOL!

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sheeshshe wrote:big jims? yes?

I need to start writing down all the varieties that I want to plant next year!!! if I don't I won't remember when it is time to order seeds in the spring! LOL!
If you want the big ones, remember to order the "NUMEX Big Jim". If I remember correctly, the "Big Jim" is simply a multicolored fairly normal sized pepper.

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sheeshshe wrote:big jims? yes?

I need to start writing down all the varieties that I want to plant next year!!! if I don't I won't remember when it is time to order seeds in the spring! LOL!
Click on the link I included in my previous post. Those are the ones Ted is talking about. They'll go a foot long. I suspect you need to plant them on stilts, though, based on the half-dozen I have curling around the base of each of my plants :-)
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Sheeshshe, I had another thought. I have a friend, well, a son of a friend, who is a weed expert and teaches at the University of Idaho. Years ago, when I was having a pepper problem, I called him. After advising me on what to do, he told me that the best website in the business for pepper questions is the [url=https://www.chilepepperinstitute.org/]University of New Mexico's Chile Institute[/url].

That's where these Nu-Mex's were bred. They were also the first to have the hottest pepper in the world, which name I can not remember, except that it hailed from India, had a J and a B in its name, and was, I think, 1,000,000 scoville units hotter than a Habanero. Mega hot. You would need to wear lead-lined gloves to harvest them :roll:

Anyhow, if I were going to grow any of the Nu-Mex products, I would go straight to the source for my seeds. They cost a little more, but you seriously know what you're getting!
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"They were also the first to have the hottest pepper in the world, which name I can not remember, except that it hailed from India, had a J and a B in its name, "

Bhut Jalokia I believe. Some call them ghost peppers.

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I've got a few bhut jolokias in my garden. They are currently the hottest peppers in the world...rating a maximum 1,000,000 scoville heat units. To put this in perspective, jalapenos max out at 8,000 scovilles.

The formerly hottest in the world was the "red savina" habanero, which was about 500,000 scovilles.

Interestingly enough, the ghost peppers have just started producing, about 1.5 to 2 months later than all the others. I'm hoping they grow fast so I can have a chance to taste one before frost :D.
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garden5 wrote:I've got a few bhut jolokias in my garden. They are currently the hottest peppers in the world...rating a maximum 1,000,000 scoville heat units. To put this in perspective, jalapenos max out at 8,000 scovilles.

The formerly hottest in the world was the "red savina" habanero, which was about 500,000 scovilles.

Interestingly enough, the ghost peppers have just started producing, about 1.5 to 2 months later than all the others. I'm hoping they grow fast so I can have a chance to taste one before frost :D.
Garden5, I don't think you're supposed to eat them. Most people use them as varnish remover :twisted:
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Garden5,

If you eat one, you will be begging for an early frost. Call me when you get out of the hospital and can talk again.

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I'll be sure to let ya know, Ted :lol:.

I'm not planning on eating a whole one, maybe just a small piece.....without the seeds or membrane. I'll certainly be interested to see how adding one to a big pot of chili spices it up, though :wink:.
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I've not heard anyone discuss how they taste. The amount of heat compared to the amount of pepper used may dilute the taste to much. I've always loved the taste of Habenero when one is used in chili or even hot sauce. Even the Habenero has to be diluted to reduce the heat. It's taste is strong enough to still come through. It doesn't have the taste of a normal Chile pepper. It has a fruity taste that lingers for long time.

sheeshshe,

I'm sorry! We seem to keep taking a wrong turn somewhere and it usually has nothing to do with the question you asked.

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oh its all in good fun. its making my topic look popular! ROFL!

you guys made me almost spit my oatmeal on the screen with the "If you eat one, you will be begging for an early frost. Call me when you get out of the hospital and can talk again."

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Okay. Since you don't appear to be offended by tangents, I'd like to ask a question I've been thinking about digressing with: How's that salsa recipe of yours? I haven't yet found one I like. Well, last year I found a terrific green-tomato one that I really like. (I'm currently finishing up my last jar. How's that for timing?)

However, I haven't yet found a salsa recipe I like for the red tomatoes, and the green-tomato one is a little off in appearance. Would you mind sharing your recipe, if it's not too much work and if you're really pleased with it?

In a week to 10 days, I'm gonna have hot peppers and tomatoes by the bushel-full!
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um it is one of those things that I eyeball it? LOL! I started with a recipe online and ended up just tossing it in after making it a few times. I don't do a cooked recipe, just the raw one. I do a bunch of tomatoes, some onion, jalepeno, garlic, oil, and salt. it called for cilantro but I don't like it. I jjust blend it up in the food processor. its runny, but I like it that way because all the flavors are blended together.

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Thanks, Sheeshshe! I'll keep trying different recipes until I find one I like.

How's the Jalapeno doing? Is it producing again for you?
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well... out of 6 plants I have 1 jalepeno growing. and I picked one a few weeks back. that is IT! I give up. I don't know what I'm doing wrong. I really want to try again but hate to buy a whole thing of those big jim seeds for just a couple plants. do you know if people do little co-ops or trades in the spring with seeds?

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sheeshshe wrote:well... out of 6 plants I have 1 jalepeno growing. and I picked one a few weeks back. that is IT! I give up. I don't know what I'm doing wrong. I really want to try again but hate to buy a whole thing of those big jim seeds for just a couple plants. do you know if people do little co-ops or trades in the spring with seeds?
Isn't this where the discussion started?

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ROFL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I do believe we've come full circle LOL!!!!!

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sheeshshe wrote:well... do you know if people do little co-ops or trades in the spring with seeds?
Sheeshshe, I never plant all of my seeds, because sometimes things don't go as planned. I just pulled out the packet that friend sent me, and there are five seeds left. Unfortunately, I fear I assumed they were Nu-Mex, and they may well be Nu-Mex, but the label he put on them reads simply, "Big Jim Hot Pepper."

I haven't taste-tested the peppers yet. They are just now starting to turn red, which they do working from the base to the tip, quite attractively. The plants are currently, I suppose, 30" tall, but this summer hasn't been a fair test of any peppers up here, having only begun on July 8. I suspect they'll go at least 4' tall under ideal conditions. The peppers are slender, and long, 6 to 7", I suppose, and curl all over the place, especially the ones at the bottom of the plant.

If you're interested, PM me with your mailing address, and I'll send you these five seeds. (Why do I feel like Jack the Giant Slayer? I'm gonna need a cow in exchange, I hope you know.) Five seeds should be enough to make certain you get two to four plants.

Ted, I went online, and I can't find a Big Jim that's not the Nu-Mex type. Are you sure there are other Big Jim's?
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Stella,

According to the following website, the Big Jim pepper was developed at NMSU in 1975 and is sometimes known as an Aneheim pepper.

https://www.kitchengardenseeds.com/cgi-bin/catview.cgi?_fn=Product&_category=30

According to this site, they have the Numex Big Jim and the Numex Heritage Big Jim.

https://chile-pepper-seeds.net/varieties.html

The Chile Pepper Institute at NMSU lists both the Numex Big Jim and the Numex Heritage Big Jim at the following link.

https://www.chilepepperinstitute.org/cart/seeds/nmsu_varieties/

Apparently, the Numex Heritage Big Jim is the larger variety. I am almost sure I read on one page, the Big Jim pepper was a normal sized Jalapeno in a variety of colors, but I don't remember where.

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According to the following website, the Big Jim pepper was developed at NMSU in 1975 and is sometimes known as an Aneheim pepper.

https://www.kitchengardenseeds.com/cgi-bin/catview.cgi?_fn=Product&_category=30
How interesting! That means the pepper I've been labeling "Anaheim NM" because it was called "Anaheim New Mexico" in the 10+ year old souvenir multi seed hot pepper packet that I planted from could be the very pepper you have bee talking about? They're about 8 in long on the average.

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Good stuff, Ted; thanks! Based on the photos, mine looks more like the NuMex Heritage, no Big Jim about it. The ninth photo down on the last site you listed looks more like what I have, which was why I was surprised to learn these are good for chili rellenos. My peppers are not 2.5" at the base, more like 1.5".
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Ah, even more interesting... I think mine looks MOST like New Mexico. 8)

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Numex Big Jim are supposed to be like jalpenos, aren't they? I thought that Anaheim pepper where chili peppers?

Ok, now I'm starting to get confused :?.
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Look at the link tedln posted and Stella mentioned. :wink:

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stella1751 wrote:Thanks, Sheeshshe! I'll keep trying different recipes until I find one I like.

How's the Jalapeno doing? Is it producing again for you?
Stella, shoot me a PM to remind me and I'll dig up my salsa recipe for you. It's always a big hit and easy to customize.

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When I eat peppers in any way, I want the most taste I can get with some heat. According to the CPI in the following statement, The NUMEX Heritage Big Jim has five times the flavor of the regular Numex Big Jim.

"Our research can be hot and cool at the same time. Paul Bosland, co-founder and director of the CPI, was responsible for finding the world's hottest chile pepper, the Bhut Jolokia. In the fall of 2006, the Guinness Book of Records confirmed Bosland's discovery. Discoveries like these are not rare for the Chile Pepper Institute. The record-holder for the world's largest chile pepper is a specimen of the 'NuMex Big Jim' variety that was developed in at NMSU in 1976. And recently, the release of NuMex Heritage 6-4, provides a chile pepper with 5X the flavor of the standard green chile."

The reason I stopped growing the very productive banana peppers was the fact that they were tasteless. You could get a hot variety, but they were stll tasteless and bland. I think the NUMEX Heritage Big Jim is the way to go. Now all I need to do is wait for the seed companies to catch up and then do a google search for the Heritage seed.

I noticed in my small town grocery store this weekend, they have a display of the "Hatch" chile peppers. They are simply the original NUMEX Big Jim peppers grown at Hatch New Mexico. They are large.

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Sometimes, when the wife and I are passing through Northern New Mexico or Southern Colorado this time of year, the Anaheim (Big Jim) harvest is peaking. The roadside stands selling honey, nuts, and all the locally harvested products are in full swing. They all have large roasting bins which rotate over a propane burner. The bins are large enough to hold two or possibly three bushels of peppers and still leave room for the peppers to move as they rotate. They literally burn the peppers until the skin is black and falling off. The flesh of the peppers has become very soft at that point.

When the peppers have finished roasting, a line of customers has usually formed and the peppers are placed in large, clear, plastic bags. They are still hot and steaming in the bags. A bag of peppers costs about $5.00. When you get them home, you can remove all the blackened skin or leave it on (the blackened skin gives the peppers a smoky flavor that I like). I like to make pepper sandwiches. You need nothing but the peppers. I cook with them. I make salsa (you can buy all the ingredients at the same stand you purchased the peppers from). I don't use a recipe. I just keep adding stuff until it looks right and tastes right. I love it, because the peppers seem to have the flavor of the mountains and the clean air that I love.

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You are making me hungry, Ted. And I'm not even a big fan of NM green chili's. I think I need to try some this year.
tedln wrote:Sometimes, when the wife and I are passing through Northern New Mexico or Southern Colorado this time of year, the Anaheim (Big Jim) harvest is peaking. The roadside stands selling honey, nuts, and all the locally harvested products are in full swing. They all have large roasting bins which rotate over a propane burner. The bins are large enough to hold two or possibly three bushels of peppers and still leave room for the peppers to move as they rotate. They literally burn the peppers until the skin is black and falling off. The flesh of the peppers has become very soft at that point.

When the peppers have finished roasting, a line of customers has usually formed and the peppers are placed in large, clear, plastic bags. They are still hot and steaming in the bags. A bag of peppers costs about $5.00. When you get them home, you can remove all the blackened skin or leave it on (the blackened skin gives the peppers a smoky flavor that I like). I like to make pepper sandwiches. You need nothing but the peppers. I cook with them. I make salsa (you can buy all the ingredients at the same stand you purchased the peppers from). I don't use a recipe. I just keep adding stuff until it looks right and tastes right. I love it, because the peppers seem to have the flavor of the mountains and the clean air that I love.

Ted

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jmoore wrote:You are making me hungry, Ted. And I'm not even a big fan of NM green chili's. I think I need to try some this year.
Ditto to that, Jmoore! Ted's description reminded me of the last time I was in Tijuana, not the border part most people see, but real Tijuana, where (at the time) vendors lined the streets with their little carts, and you could buy roasted peppers, gen-u-ine tamales in the corn husk, and tortillas so fresh the flour came off on your clothes. You knew you'd hit the right part of town when the scent made your mouth water. This was back in the early 70's, so I don't know if it's still there. Man, that was one good-smelling town!
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mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm


now I want SALSA! and jalepenos! but I can not. I had my wisdom teeth out the other day and it is only boring mushy food for me :( all this salsa talk etc is making me :evil:

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sheeshshe wrote:mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm


now I want SALSA! and jalepenos! but I can not. I had my wisdom teeth out the other day and it is only boring mushy food for me :( all this salsa talk etc is making me :evil:
Lucky for you your jalapenos took a break, huh? :lol:
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jmoore,

They also roast well in the oven or on the grill. They are not quite as good as when you can eat them while looking at snow covered mountains, but they are good.

Ted
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