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sheeshshe
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where did I go wrong with my jalepeno peppers?

they grew beautifully, got up to a foot tall and bushed out a bit. they flowered (well some flwoered) and I got 1 pepper. one more is growing. that is all. not many flowers but a few. what gives?

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vtown05
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I heard giving peppers to much nitrogen will cause it to grow very few or no flowers at all.
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sheeshshe
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hmmmm. I may have top dressed them with some chicken poo... I cant' remember now if I did that r not. I put a bunch of compost in the hole when I planted them inthe spring. not sure if any of that contributed to to much nitrogen?

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vtown05
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Chicken poo is pretty high in nitrogen. Higher than most manures I believe.
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vtown05
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I came across this site about manure. Check it out.

https://www.plantea.com/manure.htm
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farmerlon
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sheeshshe wrote:... I cant' remember now if I did that r not....
It's hard to be perfect at it and keep track of every detail; but, I highly recommend keeping a garden journal to record your daily activities and planting details. It's a great reference to have... really helps you repeat successes, and a great learning tool that can keep you from repeating mistakes. :)

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sheeshshe
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mmmm good idea, garden journal!!


now, I could go out there and look to see if I did it HAH. it would still be on top :)

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For me, peppers are probably the easiest vegetable to grow. I amend the soil with compost, plant the seedlings, water, and then let them be.

I don't give them anything else besides water once they are established. I get lots of flowers and peppers this way.

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did you get a lot of flowers, but they just dropped off after a couple of days?

or were there very few flowers.

In my limited experience, having your nitrogen out of whack with phosphorus can lead to weak blooming. That could mean too much N, or just not enough Phosphorus.

If you had blooms that just didn't fruit up, that's probably a lack of pollenation. Did you make fun of the local bees? Live in a city?

When I did peppers indoors I had to hand pollinate and it sucked...outdoors the wind usually does a decent job, as do the variety of flying insects that visit the plants.

Next year though I'm following a tip and planting fragrant herbs around the perimeter of the garden to attract more pollinatoers.
Growing: brandwine heirloom toms & early girl toms, red bell peppers, cayenne, poblanos, 2 types of cukes, bush beans, peas, lettuce (seeded), and poultry herbs around the perimeter of the garden.

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Jalapenos can self pollinate. All you need to do is give the flower trusses a little tap to shake loose the pollen within the flowers.

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I'm curious. I know peppers do well in the warmer zones, but do they normally grow and produce well as far north as Maine?

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I don't know whether you would consider Wyoming north, Tedlin, but I've had some serious luck with peppers up here! I've been advised not to try Bell peppers because they have a longer growing season, but everything else does well :-)
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stella1751 wrote:I don't know whether you would consider Wyoming north, Tedlin, but I've had some serious luck with peppers up here! I've been advised not to try Bell peppers because they have a longer growing season, but everything else does well :-)
Stella, If I remember correctly, peppers are your primary crop. I think it was you who once wrote you built a 10' X 10' raised bed in your front yard just for peppers and then gave them to the local food pantry. I had almost forgot. I think I was surprised the first time I learned you were growing peppers in Wyoming. They just seem like more of a warm climate crop to me. Then I remember the best Chilies are grown in New Mexico and Southern Colorado where they roast them by the bushel in open, propane fueled roasters.

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tedln wrote:Stella, If I remember correctly, peppers are your primary crop. I think it was you who once wrote you built a 10' X 10' raised bed in your front yard just for peppers and then gave them to the local food pantry. I had almost forgot. I think I was surprised the first time I learned you were growing peppers in Wyoming. They just seem like more of a warm climate crop to me. Then I remember the best Chilies are grown in New Mexico and Southern Colorado where they roast them by the bushel in open, propane fueled roasters.

Ted
The bed is 6.5' x 6.5', a tad excessive, but it fit around the utility lines :-)

I started growing peppers when I was living in Cheyenne. (I'm now in Casper.) My soil there was almost pure chalk: pale beige and hard as a rock. I had to soak the bed the night before turning soil and then still pound each spadeful I turned. Those peppers loved it! That's where I became convinced that peppers prefer poor soil, which I had read somewhere.

I remember one year I gave seedlings to a friend, another organic gardener. Having resided at the same place for a dozen years, her soil was rich, with a wonderful texture. She was unable to get her peppers to so much as flower while mine were weighted down with produce. I am also an organic gardener, but it takes years to improve chalk.

The reason I was advised, by another Cheyenne gardening friend, to avoid Bells was because they need to develop a thick wall before harvesting, and we just don't have the growing season to develop that thickness. I grew them once in containers, and I think she was right, though one attempt does not a study make 8)
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Stella,

Bell peppers in my climate probably exhibit different tendencies than in yours. My bell peppers grow much faster and produce harvest-able peppers much earlier than my jalapenos. When the "hot" weather hits, my bells are pretty much finished until fall. The jalapenos are just getting into high gear when the Bells are fading. Right now, my jalapenos and habaneros are loaded with peppers. I picked them last week, but they are full again. My poor little bell peppers are struggling to stay alive until fall. I can't comment intelligently about the different soils that peppers prefer. I do know the jalapenos react well to some side dressing when the leaves start to yellow and the blossoms start dropping. It leads me to believe they prefer a nutrient rich soil, but I'm not sure. I have been disappointed with my jalapenos last year and this year. I have been expecting larger fruit, but the largest is only two inches long. The pods seem to be fully developed, but small. I bought some at the market this past weekend to stuff. They were over six inches long. My jalapeno plants are over four feet tall while the habeneros are only two feet tall, but very bushy in shape. I have no idea how many of those tendencies are climate induced or nutrient induced.

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very interesting!! huh. I wonder what is different about my soil that it didn't work... :( time to research jalepenos I guess!

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sheeshshe wrote:very interesting!! huh. I wonder what is different about my soil that it didn't work... :( time to research jalepenos I guess!
I don't know if a simple recipe (one size fits all) exists for growing peppers of different varieties. I know I have a hard time growing bell peppers when others claim they are the easiest. I grow jalapenos with almost no effort. Stella grows peppers well in Wyoming in poor soil while my soil is nuturent rich.

I've been on Avery Island in Louisiana many times where the Mcllhenny plantation grows the Tabasco peppers to make Tabasco sauce. Their climate is very hot and very humid. Their soil is the dark, rich, (gumbo) soil typical of the alluvial soil deposited all over the Mississippi river basin. I was told the Tabasco peppers will not grow as well in any other location.

If someone comes up with the answer, I hope they tell me how to grow bell peppers.

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tedln wrote:Stella,

Bell peppers in my climate probably exhibit different tendencies than in yours. My bell peppers grow much faster and produce harvest-able peppers much earlier than my jalapenos. When the "hot" weather hits, my bells are pretty much finished until fall. The jalapenos are just getting into high gear when the Bells are fading. Right now, my jalapenos and habaneros are loaded with peppers. I picked them last week, but they are full again. My poor little bell peppers are struggling to stay alive until fall. I can't comment intelligently about the different soils that peppers prefer. I do know the jalapenos react well to some side dressing when the leaves start to yellow and the blossoms start dropping. It leads me to believe they prefer a nutrient rich soil, but I'm not sure. I have been disappointed with my jalapenos last year and this year. I have been expecting larger fruit, but the largest is only two inches long. The pods seem to be fully developed, but small. I bought some at the market this past weekend to stuff. They were over six inches long. My jalapeno plants are over four feet tall while the habeneros are only two feet tall, but very bushy in shape. I have no idea how many of those tendencies are climate induced or nutrient induced.

Ted
Maybe you are onto something by saying "nutrient-rich" instead of "poor." I know that no matter how long I had lived in Cheyenne, I would have had soil with crummy texture. However, having been the first to break the sod in that area, odds are high my soil was indeed nutrient rich, even though it was chunky and lacking in color.

I wonder, and I would like to hear from others on this, about the six-inch long Jalapenos you are seeing at your local market. I've grown many a Jalapeno, and the biggest I've seen, this at my current location, was four inches long.

When I was a child, a gazillion years ago, my father had to have a jar of canned Jalapenos as a condiment at every dinner table. Those Jalapenos were 3" long, tops. My opinion is that size is unimportant when it comes to these old-time favorites: flavor is everything.

I am devastated with envy at your productive Habaneros, by the way. This happens to be a Habanero year for me. I've a few Nu-Mex and a few Fish, but I crammed my pepper bed full of Habaneros, which seriously need hot, dry conditions. Thanks to our wet, cold June, my biggest Habanero plant would have to stand on its tip-toes to reach 1' tall, and I have probably a dozen peppers between a dozen plants. They've started to flower in earnest, but I'm only four or five weeks away from our average first freeze, and there's a good chance they won't make it. I've promised my mailman and my neighbor Habaneros, and I fear I will be letting them down. This year, my Habaneros just can't overcome Wyoming's weather vagaries :oops:
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Stella, my immediate thought is -- if the plants are that small, it would be easy to put some plastic over them.... 8)

I'm growing a bunch (or is that a peck) of peppers too. Fish, Anaheim New Mexico, Jalapeno M, Jalapeno jr. (2nd gen from last year's), Cubanelle, Royal Black, Czechoslovakian Black, Aji Dulce.... I thought I was growing Tepin as well but it doesn't look anything like it. I think this one is also an Anaheim. Also growing Quadrato d'asti Rosso and Giallo as well as Giant Orange Bell.

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My habeneros are not as productive as the jalapenos, but they are doing well. I planted six of each this past spring. They grew so fast and so large that I pulled three of each loaded with peppers and tossed them in the compost bin. I had to do it, because they were shading some tomato plants that needed sunlight. I thought the tomatoes would grow faster than the peppers, but they didn't.

The extra large jalapenos are a hybrid giant variety. I accidentally got some one year when I bought some seedlings. I haven't seen the giant seedlings for sale since. I'm thinking about buying some seed for them this year and trying to grow my own. Most people say they are also hotter than the normal jalapeno, but I haven't found that to be true. The giants I buy at the market are very mild. They have some heat, but they are not firehouse hot. I didn't have good luck growing my pepper seedlings this past spring and had to purchase some seedlings. I'm hoping I do better growing pepper seedlings next year.

When I bought the peppers at the market, I bought one pound of peppers. That was only six peppers. It was kinda funny because when I was checking out, I looked at the display and it said one pound of Anaheim peppers at $1.89 per lb. I knew I was buying jalapenos at $0.78 per lb. When I pointed the difference out to the checker, she couldn't believe they were jalapenos because they were so large.

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About the 6 inch Jalapenos, there are giant varieties.
I'm groiwng all my peppers in containers, they are doing very well, including my Filius Blue that I have grow indoors all summer due to the fact I got seeds for it in June so it was in under lights this whole time, and it has about 8 buds on it however it is only about 8 inches tall, very pretty plant, purple stalk stalk and alot of purple in the foliage. My red Beauty Bell plant is is doing insanely well with i think 12 peppers growing and about 40 on the way. "Juneuary" didn't help with production, actually stunted growth for a while.

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I think I am going to try to find seeds for these giant jalapenos. I hadn't decided what type of pepper to try next year, and those sound amazing. I'll bet they'll make terrific chile rellenos!
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Stella,
I bet they would. I think if you google "giant jalapeno seed", you will find an ample supply. If not, I can look back on another forum where I identified a supplier and give it to you.

I think I still prefer an Anaheim or poblano for Chili Rellenos. I prefer the tempura batter for Rellenos.

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The biggest I can find is the [url=https://www.ballhort.com/Growers/plant_info.aspx?phid=048300001023108&dispmode=]Gigante Jalapeno Pepper.[/url] This website says they will go 5". If these are the ones, Burpee says its the only one with the seeds.

I wonder whether the ones Tedlin has are the [url=https://www.bonnieplants.com/products/tabid/255/p-966-mammoth-jalape241o.aspx]Mammoth Jalapeno[/url] sold by Bonnie plants. If he bought plants and if his local distributor uses Bonnie, then I'll bet these are the ones he is growing.
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tedln wrote:Stella,
I bet they would. I think if you google "giant jalapeno seed", you will find an ample supply. If not, I can look back on another forum where I identified a supplier and give it to you.

I think I still prefer an Anaheim or poblano for Chili Rellenos. I prefer the tempura batter for Rellenos.

Ted
I found that link while I was looking: [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=121936&sid=a0811548ca8cd1af5983457fe49e63c6]Giant Jalapenos[/url]. Park seed appears to be what you came up with. I checked, and if they did have it, they don't appear to have it now.

Burpee appears to have the largest. And, yes, Poblanos can't be beat for chile Rellenos. You can stuff a heckuva lot of cheese into a Poblano!
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Yes,

Burpee is probably the original grower and owner of the rights to the F! seed. Reimer and some of the others probably buy their seed from Burpee and rename it.

I did notice the size ranged from 4" to 5" in the blurbs. The one plant I got accidentally in a six pack of jalapeno seedlings grew to 6". It may have something to do with climate and zone. The giant peppers produced at the same rate and time as the normal jalapenos so they had to grow faster. The plant and the leaves were also larger than normal. It was like someone injected a normal jalapeno plant with steroids. I didn't think a lot about them until I found them in a Mexican market. Now the typical Mexican markets seem to have huge piles of the giant peppers and smaller piles of the smaller peppers. The ones I bought last week were from Walmart. I was surprised to see them at Walmart. I grabbed one of the plastic bag and started picking the peppers I wanted. When I was through (it probably took less than a minute for me to pick the ones I wanted), a line of people were behind me ready to load up with them.

I was in a Mexican market about a month ago. When I was checking out, the lady in front had a huge bag of the giant jalapenos as well as a lot of tomatoes, cilantro, and other fresh veggies. I asked her what she was doing with so many hot peppers. She said she was hosting a party that evening and all the veggies were for her salsa. She invited me, but I couldn't go.

Ted

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csvd87 wrote:About the 6 inch Jalapenos, there are giant varieties.
I'm groiwng all my peppers in containers, they are doing very well, including my Filius Blue that I have grow indoors all summer due to the fact I got seeds for it in June so it was in under lights this whole time, and it has about 8 buds on it however it is only about 8 inches tall, very pretty plant, purple stalk stalk and alot of purple in the foliage. My red Beauty Bell plant is is doing insanely well with i think 12 peppers growing and about 40 on the way. "Juneuary" didn't help with production, actually stunted growth for a while.
Did you grow from seed or seedlings? Do you keep them inside year round? Do you expect them to continue to grow and produce year round inside. Many people grow pepper plants indoors as decorative plants.

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Tedlin, I suspect you could sell ice cubes to an Eskimo. I am now determined to grow these Jalapenos Gigante next year. Burpee's photo didn't hurt. That is one gorgeous pepper!

I wonder whether I should order my seeds now. Based on your experience at Walmart, I'll bet these will be a popular purchase.

And Sheeshshe, I apologize if I hijacked your thread. Once Tedlin started talking 6" Jalapenos and once I ascertained he hadn't gone mad, I got pretty excited.

My experience with peppers is that they like a challenge. They don't want to be coddled. They'll grow anywhere, and if the conditions are less than ideal, so much the better. Most importantly, avoid nitrogen. If I fear my soil in a certain bed is too nitrogen-rich for peppers, I work in some partially finished compost or some straight leaves. The decomposition of this organic matter depletes nitrogen from the soil, and peppers tend to respond nicely.
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Gosh, thank you Stella. I'm gonna have to look for a good ice cube supplier. I will take that as a C+ on my debating skills. I've always tried to follow the old adage. "If you can't dazzle them with your brilliance, then baffle them with your bull*^&#@". I've always had a pretty good line of bull. :D

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tedln wrote:Gosh, thank you Stella. I'm gonna have to look for a good ice cube supplier. I will take that as a C+ on my debating skills. I've always tried to follow the old adage. "If you can't dazzle them with your brilliance, then baffle them with your bull*^&#@". I've always had a pretty good line of bull. :D

Ted
I'd have to give you an A. You managed to incorporate all three rhetorical appeals--ethos, pathos, and logos--into your argument.
  • Ethos (Demonstration of a character your reader can trust and respect): When you wrote, "Burpee is probably the original grower and owner of the rights to the F! seed. Reimer and some of the others probably buy their seed from Burpee and rename it," you indicated a familarity with your subject. The reader knows you have done your research, and that awareness makes the reader trust and respect you.

    Pathos (appeal to the reader's emotions): Your use of personal narrative to support the implied assertion that these are desirable peppers both recognized and catered to the reader's yen to grow something out of the ordinary.

    Logos (appeal to reason): You unwittingly went with deductive logic on this. Knowing that the reader liked to grow peppers, suspecting that the reader liked to grow peppers that were out of the ordinary (my Habaneros are a mixture of chocolate, standard, giant yellow, and two more I can't remember), and recognizing the reader as a member of a capitalistic society (he who dies with the most goodies wins), you implied the following syllogism:
    • People in a capitalistic society are bound to a desire to possess unique items.
      Stella is a person in a capitalistic society.
      Stella is bound to a desire to possess unique items.
See. Given your audience, purpose, and writing forum, you could sell ice cubes to an Eskimo. I WANT 6" Jalapenos Gigante!
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tedln wrote:
csvd87 wrote:About the 6 inch Jalapenos, there are giant varieties.
I'm groiwng all my peppers in containers, they are doing very well, including my Filius Blue that I have grow indoors all summer due to the fact I got seeds for it in June so it was in under lights this whole time, and it has about 8 buds on it however it is only about 8 inches tall, very pretty plant, purple stalk stalk and alot of purple in the foliage. My red Beauty Bell plant is is doing insanely well with i think 12 peppers growing and about 40 on the way. "Juneuary" didn't help with production, actually stunted growth for a while.
Did you grow from seed or seedlings? Do you keep them inside year round? Do you expect them to continue to grow and produce year round inside. Many people grow pepper plants indoors as decorative plants.

Ted
4 Of my pepper plants were starters bought from a nursery my Jalapeno, Red Beauty, Banana, and Sweet Cayenne. all others are from seed, which are an unknown variety of long sweet, an unknown variety of bell, Filius Blue, Black Pearl, Cayenne, Chocolate Bell. I plan to bring a Chocolate Bell, Cayenne and probably my Red Beauty inside at seasons end and try and keep them producing as long as I can, they will join my Filius Blue, and Black Pearl. I'm going to see what else I can get to grow indoors, I do have an Okra, Black Sesame and a Borage plant growing, about 3 weeks old ( had to test germination, and since they germinated I might as well try. I may post a topic with pics of my plants, but not likely as I am quite lazy and forgetful.

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:roll: You nailed me! Now I will feel so insecure about my writing skills and logical presentation skills, I will start stuttering. It simply isn't fair having someone who knows what you are doing observing. :D

sheeshshe,

I apologize! I wish an easy answer to your question existed. It may, but I don't know it. I still have a sneaking suspicion that it is climate related. I've been waiting for someone who lives right down the street from you to post telling us they are having great success with their peppers this year.

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csvd87,

Concerning the lazy and forgetful part of your post, welcome to the club.

Concerning the gardening part of your post, are you growing all of that indoors? If I remember correctly, Vancouver Island has a fairly temperate climate compared with most of Canada. What months are considered your prime crop growing months? I'm asking because I am surprised at how late you are starting some of your plants. I would think considering your latitude, you would be daylight limited, even if it is warm enough to grow; by late August.

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that is some seriously thread hijacking, LOL!


OK, perhaps its climate? its been a nice hot summer here though so IDK! I use a lot of jalepenos so its quite the bummer that we've been purchasing quite a lot. and darnit I ran out tonight and needed more. too bad I couldn't just go out and pick one that I needed grr.

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sheeshshe wrote:that is some seriously thread hijacking, LOL!


OK, perhaps its climate? its been a nice hot summer here though so IDK! I use a lot of jalepenos so its quite the bummer that we've been purchasing quite a lot. and darnit I ran out tonight and needed more. too bad I couldn't just go out and pick one that I needed grr.
I'm curious. How do you use a "lot" of jalapenos? We need to trade places. I use some jalapenos and grow more than I can use. You use a lot and can't grow enough. Do you use them for seasoning, eat raw, make a vegetable course out of them?

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salsa!!! lots and lots of salsa!!

all the tomatoes get turned into salsa. we really like it LOL! so in the freezer it goes for the winter. I picked 17 pounds of tomatoes today. and so I just turned it all into salsa. and ran out of jalepenos. grrr.

now, I planted 6 jalepeno plants and picked 1 pepper so far. there is one more growing. I think that is all. def not enough for my salsa making obsession..........

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I've kind of lost track of the origin of your thread and where it was going, and I don't have the time to go back and read it now, but sticking with the climate issue, maybe there is a micro-climate in your garden that you can take advantage of.

For example: South or southwest side of your house, rock wall, or even a big boulder... or a bed with a hardscape on its south side to reflect the heat and also act as heat sink to retain the heat through the night. Do you have lots of rocks around your property like some people? You could, even right now, place some rocks on the north side of the plants.

(Huh. That gave me an idea. *I* could do this for my watermelon that I started late... and the sweet potatoes.... 8))

Look for area that gets a lot of sun or the hotter south~west sun even if it's shaded in the morning.

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tedln wrote:csvd87,

Concerning the lazy and forgetful part of your post, welcome to the club.

Concerning the gardening part of your post, are you growing all of that indoors? If I remember correctly, Vancouver Island has a fairly temperate climate compared with most of Canada. What months are considered your prime crop growing months? I'm asking because I am surprised at how late you are starting some of your plants. I would think considering your latitude, you would be daylight limited, even if it is warm enough to grow; by late August.

Ted
Sunset now is around 7:15 i think. I am in zone 7a or b.. depends on the year, last year was maybe -10C in the Winter, and year before was -20C, but as far as overall daylight, we get a ton in the summer, longest day was Saturday June 19th sun up at 3:52am sun down at 8:11, which i think is crap because we get daylight until around 10 to 10:30 around then. Anyways, hottest it gets here is 32C, but averages around 25 to 28.
It did get hot enough this year to kill my peas. It does cool off quick, it was 32 on Sunday, and it was maybe 24 today, projected to be 17 on Sunday with lows of 9. Last frost around Victoria Day(middle of may) guess optimum months are June through to September. And yes I will be growing a bunch of stuff indoors, gotta keep me busy doing something. Also I got started late, had no interest in gardening until I was wandering around a nursery with my mom on mothers day, so with that logic i will be "ending" late anyways I feel like i am rambling and not making a whole lot of sense.

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sheeshshe
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Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:17 am
Location: maine

AS, put the rocks like right in front of the jalepeno plants on the north side?

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applestar
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Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Right. If they're big rocks put them far enough away that the leaves don't touch. If they're small or flat rocks, you can sort of mulch all around... Or if you have big and small, put the small ones on the south/ sun side, big ones on the north side to reflect the sun back. If big enough, it could even provide some shelter from cold air. Humidity will condense on the rocks and water the plants so keep that in mind. But! You may not want rock mulch on sun/south side if they might keep the soil too cool.

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