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jal_ut
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Varieties? Oh my.................

I just got to adding up how many varieties I have in my veggy garden this year. 41

Then there is another 9 varieties in perennial beds.
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TZ -OH6
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Which vegetables do you have have the most varieties? Tomatoes and peppers are pretty easy to get high numbers, but ten varieties of carrots would be very impressive.

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jal_ut
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5 kinds of onions.
3 corn
3 squash
2 tomatoes
2 broccoli
2 cabbage
2 peas

No, just one carrot. :)
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DoubleDogFarm
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The varieties add up pretty fast. I'm growing somewhere in the 40 plus range. These are in smaller plantings then yours Jim.

2 carrots -- 8 Tomatoes
3 beans -- 3 Peppers
1 beet -- 2 Spinach
1 chard -- 4 Lettuces
1 collard -- 4 cucumbers
1 broccoli -- 9 squashes
1 tomatotillo -- 1 Garlic
2 Egg Plant -- 3 Asian greens
1 Celery --

Some of these have been harvested, but at one time were growing at the sametime.

Eric

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applestar
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Hey DD -- do you INTER plant those or do you plant them in blocks? I assume you grew them together in your raised wide rows.

I mean obviously you wouldn't plant carrots in between tomatoes -- probably carrots on the outside, but in general, are they distributed throughout?

:wink: I don't need to ask how you plant yours, jal. :wink:

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Apple,

You can call me Eric.

Here are some early in the season pictures.

This first picture. Beans along the horse panel with spinach at their feet. On the other side of the panel is mostly Swiss chard. Amongst the chard there are 4 tomato plants and a couple tomatillos.
[img]https://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/eric_wa/DSC02200.jpg[/img]

In this picture, more like block planting. Square foot gardening.
Arugula, 2 types of lettuce and 2 types of bush bean. The lettuce and arugula has been harvested. The bush beans are at my feet, not in the picture.
[img]https://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/eric_wa/Vegetable%20Garden%20May%2030th%202010/DSC02245.jpg[/img]

This last one, more beans with spinach, collards and broccoli on the end. Other side Sorrel and leeks.
[img]https://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/eric_wa/Vegetable%20Garden%20May%2030th%202010/DSC02244.jpg[/img]

I do some monoculture also. Full beds of potatoes, garlic, tomatillos and tomatoes. Several beds of mixed squashes and cucumbers.

Jim, Sorry for crashing your post.

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Jim,

Do you plant the same varieties every year :?: I try to stay some what consitent, but get persuaded by the catalogs.

I choose varieties by early maturing, 95% open pollinated and maybe 75% organic.

Eric

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5 kinds of oinons? That's impressive. I'm doing 3 kinds but only 1 is doing well. I did go with quite a few different kinds of squash this year, though.
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jal_ut
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Do you plant the same varieties every year
I have some old favorites that I plant every year. I also like to try new things. Part of my large number of varieties is new thngs that I am trying this year. One variety of onion (bunching onion), 2 varieties of corn (Incredible and Bodacious), birdhouse gourds, two varieties of shallots, one variety of garlic, and kale are new varieties for me this year.

I am favorably impressed with the kale and bunching onions, but the other stuff has not matured yet. The gourds are growing on the ground. I have a hunch they would be quite impressive on the right trellis. They are sure putting out a lot of long vines. It is a race between them and the pumpkins though. In fact all my squash are really outdoing themselves this year. Must be the chicken do-do.
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Bunching onions? Are you talking about the kinds that bunch on the tops of stems (Egyptian walking onions) or the kind that bunch underground (potato onions)?
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jal_ut
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The bunching onions I got were labeled "Long White Bunching". They are Allium fistulosum. They do not form a bulb. Sometimes called Welsh Onions, Scallions, or Green Onions. They are not Egyptian Walking Onions. I planted them from seed and they sure made lots of nice green onions. They went good at the market. I will plant these again.
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jal_ut
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Monoculture

Eric: I do some monoculture also.
Monoculture? This term keeps coming up Eric. I don't believe it even applies to small backyard gardens.

If you had 100 acres and planted it all in corn, that's monoculture.

If you have 40 varieties on one acre, no way can this be called monoculture.
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Jim,

Very true. Maybe I should call it single variety plantings. If you only plant one variety of carrot and dease set in, you may not have a carrot harvest. So I'm thinking two or more are better.

My relatives in North Dakota have monoculture. Thousands of acres of wheat, flax, or canola.

Eric

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jal_ut wrote:The bunching onions I got were labeled "Long White Bunching". They are Allium fistulosum. They do not form a bulb. Sometimes called Welsh Onions, Scallions, or Green Onions. They are not Egyptian Walking Onions. I planted them from seed and they sure made lots of nice green onions. They went good at the market. I will plant these again.
OK, here we call them green onions or, mostly, scallions.

I was thinking of something like [img]https://dillydalleydoolittle.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/treeonions_1.jpg[/img]

They grow in bunches under-ground. I'd like to give these a go next year.[/img]
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garden5
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jal_ut wrote:The bunching onions I got were labeled "Long White Bunching". They are Allium fistulosum. They do not form a bulb. Sometimes called Welsh Onions, Scallions, or Green Onions. They are not Egyptian Walking Onions. I planted them from seed and they sure made lots of nice green onions. They went good at the market. I will plant these again.
OK, here we call them green onions or, mostly, scallions.

I was thinking of something like this: [img]https://dillydalleydoolittle.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/treeonions_1.jpg[/img]

They grow in bunches under-ground. I'd like to give these a go next year.
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jal_ut
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G5, that stuff in your picture looks just like Egyptian Walking Onion bulbils. You say they grew underground? Interesting! I have not seen that.
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jal_ut wrote:G5, that stuff in your picture looks just like Egyptian Walking Onion bulbils. You say they grew underground? Interesting! I have not seen that.
Ugh, now that I look at the pic, I think you're right :oops:. I had gotten the pic off Google to show to you as an example and it looks like I goofed.

Info on these "nest" or "potato" onions is kind of scarce, but [url=https://www.motherearthnews.com/Growing-Leeks-Shallots-Scallions.aspx]here[/url] is a little info to prove I'm not just making this stuff up :lol:.

Oh, and [url=https://www.cornucopiaseeds.com.au/pages.php?pageid=18]here[/url] is some more.

Certainly something worth giving a go!
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jal_ut
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[url=https://www.backyardgardener.com/plantname/pda_e823.html]Check it out![/url]

I think your potato onions are very similar to shallots both in culture and flavor. You may have problems finding any for a start though. Shallots are easier to come by.

Any of these onions, and garlic too, will give you a better harvest if you plant the largest bulbs or cloves in the fall.
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[img]https://donce.lofthouse.com/jamaica/bunching_onion.jpg[/img]

These are the bunching onions. They are a nice mild onion. No bulbing.
Grown from seed.
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Looks yum! I usually store green onions like this chopped and frozen. Is that what you do, jal?

I bought yellow potato onions from Souther Exposure Seed Exchange last fall. I know I have a few of them growing around here somewhere.... :roll:

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jal_ut
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Looks yum! I usually store green onions like this chopped and frozen. Is that what you do, jal?
No. I use the green onions in season. These have went well at the market.

I store dry onions in the traditional mesh bag.
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