C00KiE46
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^^^I know what you mean. I also have powdery mildew on my pumpkins. I don't use the baking soda method. Does that seem like it's working? I have been using the milk mixture and I spray it every other day. If I see the leaves drying out I just cut those off, but I still keep the ones with PM and spray them. I know it doesn't look attractive with or without the leaves gone, but I notice that vines from other pumpkins come up and are filling up the spot.

imnewatthis2010
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I tried the baking soda mixture just once, but it seemed like it just made it worse. Maybe I'll try the milk mixture.

How exactly do I make it in a watering can? or should i get a spray bottle and spray it on the leaves?

C00KiE46
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I use 3 parts milk and 7 parts water and use a spray bottle. I spray it on and under the leaves I also spray the vines if I see PM present. I spray mine when the sun is going down and the garden is shaded through out the day.

imnewatthis2010
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Recently a lot of new leaves started growing in other spots in the garden, hopefully that means things won't die as much now.

1 of the 2 growing pumpkins I have is almost completely orange, I was wondering exactly when I should take it off the vine?


The other one seems to have been staying the same size, green and the size of a softball. I'm not sure if somethings wrong with the vine supporting it or not, It's still connected and not cut, but it looks thinner than some other ones.

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stella1751
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imnewatthis2010 wrote:1 of the 2 growing pumpkins I have is almost completely orange, I was wondering exactly when I should take it off the vine?
I came on to ask this exactly question! I will just add my voice to yours: When am I supposed to pick my pumpkin? The skin is hard and orange. If I leave it on the vine, will it rot or explode?
imnewatthis2010 wrote:The other one seems to have been staying the same size, green and the size of a softball. I'm not sure if somethings wrong with the vine supporting it or not, It's still connected and not cut, but it looks thinner than some other ones.
I had the same think happen with one of my growing pumpkins, a little fellow the size of a softball. I think my plants have too many pumpkins to support so have begun aborting the little guys, but I'm not certain. I'll look forward to hearing what others have to say.
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imnewatthis2010
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anyone have any advice?



Thanks

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stella1751
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I still don't know when to pick them, imnewatthis2010. I've left mine on the vine so far, and I now have two more that appear to be ready. I found this link on [url=https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/vegetable/how-to-tell-when-pumpkins-are-ripe.htm]How to Tell When a Pumpkin Is Ripe[/url], and based upon what it says, I need to pick my first one for sure.

Because I plan on freezing mine, I'm going to wait to pick it until I am certain I have the time to process it.

As for the other part of your earlier question, I have now lost two, maybe three, of my smallest pumpkins. I pruned off all the non-producing vines yesterday, and I hope that helps. I think my pumpkin plants have too many pumpkins to support all of them.
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imnewatthis2010
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Hmm.. my orange one looks like it's ready for picking, but one side still has some greenish on it. I wonder if i leave it go for a little longer if it'll get bigger?

I planted jack o lantern pumpkins, but the one i have is about 7 inches high and kind of skinny around it. The other is about the size of a softball, green with slight hints of orange.

I really wanted some big ones, but I think i definitely over planted my small area = / , especially considering I only have 2 going right now and they're this size.

Hopefully I'll get atleast a few more ones the 7inch size before halloween, I wonder if I take the almost pure orange one off it it'll help the other plants to keep their females on instead of falling off?

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stella1751
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I found two different varieties called Jack-O-Lantern. The one that is a heirloom is supposed to get pretty big. I found the following description of the heirloom one at the Roguelands Heirloom Vegetable Seeds Company website:
Jack O Lantern is a pumpkin variety bred specifically for carving Jack O Lanterns, but they are also very good for making pumpkin pies as well. Jack O Lantern is a deep orange colored, 18-24 lb. pumpkin growing from very long vines. The thick stems make for sturdy tops for Jack O'Lanterns.
The other one, a hybrid, is probably what you have. I found this description at [url=https://www.backyardgardener.com/RUPP.HTM]Rupp Seeds[/url]:
Jack O'Lantern 100 8x8" 10# Orange Large Round, uniform, snoothskinned, yellow thik flesh.
Interestingly, mine is in the same category as yours (mid-size). Rupp Seeds writes this about mine:
Autumn Gold - F1 90 10-12" 10# Orange Medium AAS Winner. Turns orange early in growing season
So, based on the Rupp description, mine is 90 days, and yours is 100. Both of ours should weigh about 10 pounds at maturity, but mine is supposed to be 10 to 12" in diameter, and yours is supposed to be 8". You said yours is already 7", right?

Here's what I think. I think mine is ready to pick. It satisfies all the criteria in that link I posted a reply or two ago. It is also at least 10" in diameter, probably more. I haven't picked it up to see what color it is underneath, though. I suppose I should do that, huh?

I don't think your pumpkin is ready to pick. It's close to the right size, but it hasn't completely turned color.

What do you think?
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imnewatthis2010
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Thanks for all this info btw.


I think I might leave mine on the vine still then, maybe for another week or two and see what happens with it, just hopefully some others start by then.

It does sound like we have similar pumpkins, just my poor decision to plant too many in this small sport caused mine to now grow as much as yours = /

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stella1751
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imnewatthis2010 wrote: It does sound like we have similar pumpkins, just my poor decision to plant too many in this small sport caused mine to now grow as much as yours = /
I had too many in a small location, too. Not as many as you, but more than the soil could handle. When I looked at mine this morning, I ccould see the poor plants are just tapped. Leaves are starting to brown; there's a patch of powdery mildew in the center; and I believe I am losing another small pumpkin.

Gardening is all about experience. You can ask all the questions you want and get all the great advice you can, but in the long run, trial-and-error is the best teacher. There's always next year, when you can make brand new mistakes. Along with those mistakes, however, come extraordinary successes!

I am toying with omitting pumpkins from next year's garden. Because of them and their voracious appetite, I got only one watermelon. I like watermelons better, and my garden is too tiny to grow both. I do believe next year will be a watermelon year for my cucurbits. Now I need to research which watermelon is best for my climate (Zone 4 + High Winds) and best for my garden (several small raised beds, of which cucurbits will go in three).

Will you be trying pumpkins again next year, imnewatthis2010?
"Imagination is more important than knowledge." -- Albert Einstein

imnewatthis2010
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I think I may try pumpkins next year, just because I really want a nice looking sized one for Halloween. But I may also try to extend the garden or put it somewhere else in my backyard for some lettuce or corn maybe. The only problem is my yard is just a normal fenced in backyard which makes it difficult to make space. There's so many options though that I'm not really sure what to grow, it all looks fun.

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I'll definitely give pumpkins a go again next year. This year I planted them a little too late and I think I shouldn't have planted them so close to the edge of the garden, my reasoning for this?

Pumpkins have a vast, shallow roost system. I think if half of this root system is competing with grass, well, things won't take off as good.

It took 3 years to get good onions, let's see how long for winner pumpkins.
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imnewatthis2010
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Found 2 new pumpkins the other day. One is the size of 2 golfballs,the other is just starting out.

Hopefully this rain storm the past 2 days hasn't affected them too much..

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I picked my biggest one yesterday to help give my poor depleted plants a break. Wouldn't you know it--there was a splotch of green right up by the stem! I had checked it to be sure, but I didn't lift it high enough.

That one was promised to my neighbor's grandchildren, anyway, so I bet it's no big deal. I still have eleven pumpkins left, in varying degrees of maturity. I haven't lost any in the last few days, so maybe the pruning helped.

I think I'll be glad when they are done. They were great in the beginning, but they get a little boring after a while :roll: I'm ready to tear out the plant and start prepping the soil for next year!
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imnewatthis2010
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I should probably prune mine, though I'm not exactly sure how to do it. It seems everytime I would cut off dead leaves or anything then it'd just make the plants look horrible. I bet this rain storm the past few days hasn't helped either.


How do you get the soil ready to sit over winter until next spring? Do you just leave teh plants in there or can you uproot them and leave them on the soil to decompose for nutrients?

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stella1751
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imnewatthis2010 wrote:How do you get the soil ready to sit over winter until next spring? Do you just leave teh plants in there or can you uproot them and leave them on the soil to decompose for nutrients?
It depends on who you ask. I know at least one member cuts her plants off at the soil and leaves the roots in to decompose over the winter. I pull my plants and stick them on the compost pile. Well, because this particular plant developed a slight case of powdery mildew when it became stressed, I will bag its leaves and toss them. Normally, though, I just add them into the compost.

I then work compost into the soil and, because we have a wicked wind up here, I layer compost on top of the bed to protect the loose soil from blowing away. Of course, this depends upon having a gradual shift from fall to winter. Sometimes winter is just here. You go to sleep in the fall and wake up in winter, with frigid temps, high winds, and snow. Ick. Then I just leave the bed as it is, wearing the mulch it wore during the summer.

In the spring, I turn the soil again and generally amend it with nutritional goodies, depending on what plants I'll be growing there. I'll be growing beans in this bed next year. Beans don't really have terrific needs. They're not heavy feeders, so I'll probably forego amendments on this bed: Compost will keep beans happy and productive. Were I growing tomatoes or peppers, I'd work in at least some bone and kelp meal, the sooner the better on the bone meal, which takes a while to degrade.

As you can see, I'm ready for these pumpkin plants to finish their job :D I'm starting to think next year!
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If you take the almost ripe pumpkin you picked inside, it should turn fully orange. The taste probably won't get any better than it is now, but, if it's kids who are getting it, that probably won't matter mush :wink: :lol:.
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stella1751
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What a mess!

"What a Mess," or "Plan Ahead." Check this out:

[img]https://i801.photobucket.com/albums/yy292/mitbah/pumpkins_August.jpg[/img]

You can't see them all in this photo, but I have six pumpkins there, vying for 4 square feet of acreage. One is slung from the chain link fence in the upper left; another is resting on a styrofoam cylinder, and the others are all fighting for a foothold at the base.
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imnewatthis2010
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picked my largest one today as when i looked at the plants vine it was soggy brown and falling apart, must have been from the rain storm but only this vine was affected.

Well after I took it inside to wash up, the vine snapped off.... gah.
I just broke off half a tooth pick and stuck them back together. Fail.


Btw. your pumpkins look real nice, I wish I could get mine growing like that

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stella1751
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imnewatthis2010 wrote:picked my largest one today as when i looked at the plants vine it was soggy brown and falling apart, must have been from the rain storm but only this vine was affected.

Well after I took it inside to wash up, the vine snapped off.... gah.
I just broke off half a tooth pick and stuck them back together. Fail.


Btw. your pumpkins look real nice, I wish I could get mine growing like that
Thanks! Remember, though, that I'm growing a different type pumpkin from yours. The Autumn Gold starts out yellow from the very beginning, which I think is way cool, and then turns orange as it ripens. None of these are ripe yet, and I live in daily fear I will lose another. I'm now down to only 13 pumpkins.

Did the "vine" break off when you took your pumpkin inside, or was it the stem?

That soggy brown vine you mentioned is odd. I wonder whether it was a leftover from the plants you pulled earlier this month.

Don't get dejected, imnewatthis2010! If you want to hear some horror stories of my first few years of gardening, if it will make you feel better, I will tell you some. We all make mistakes. I'm wishing I hadn't put all three of my pumpkin plants in the same bed as that watermelon, so I guess I'm still making mistakes :oops:

(Sue me. I thought the blasted watermelon plant was dead.)
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imnewatthis2010
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The whole vine leading from the ground up to the pumpkin was just squishy and brown and falling apart, so I just pulled it from the ground to get rid of it and cut off the pumpkin.

Though the stem wasn't as soggy, it did break off while i held it. Hopefully that tooth pick holds it on and it doesn't wither too fast. I'm still not sure what exactly I want to do with it as it's not even close to halloween

garden5
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imnewatthis2010 wrote:The whole vine leading from the ground up to the pumpkin was just squishy and brown and falling apart, so I just pulled it from the ground to get rid of it and cut off the pumpkin.

Though the stem wasn't as soggy, it did break off while i held it. Hopefully that tooth pick holds it on and it doesn't wither too fast. I'm still not sure what exactly I want to do with it as it's not even close to halloween
Weird, it almost sounds like SVB (squash vine borer), but I'm not totally certain that they affect pumpkins (I don't see why they wouldn't, especially if there aren't any other host-plants).

Stella, that pic is great. It looks like the three at the bottom are collaborating on how to knock the other guy off the "pedestal." If you look close....the one in the middle it getting ready to go for it :lol:.
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imnewatthis2010
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I was wondering how long these pumpkins I picked will last?
When i picked them the vines were completely used up and falling apart, the one was almost completely green, but is slowly turning orange now.. the other biggest one is completely orange.. but the stem popped off so i just glued it back on = /

About how long will these 2 last before I should carve them? I'd love to be able to keep them until halloween

garden5
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imnewatthis2010 wrote:I was wondering how long these pumpkins I picked will last?
When i picked them the vines were completely used up and falling apart, the one was almost completely green, but is slowly turning orange now.. the other biggest one is completely orange.. but the stem popped off so i just glued it back on = /

About how long will these 2 last before I should carve them? I'd love to be able to keep them until halloween
[url=https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=4&ved=0CCkQFjAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pumpkingrowingtips.com%2Fharvesting.htm&rct=j&q=store%20harvested%20pumpkins&ei=6_iETMShKoPknAfe6IT9AQ&usg=AFQjCNHt1lR15pwhgGGP25nMSn5JquscBg&cad=rja]Harevesting and storing pumpkins[/url].

I don't see any reason why they shouldn't make it till then.
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