tedln
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garden5 wrote:Thanks for the clarification. I've heard that if you bury a match when you plant each pepper, the sulfur will make the plants grow better and the peppers hotter.

Personally, I think this is a bit of an old wive's tale. Anyone ever try this with any luck?
There are a lot of wives tales that have no basis in fact. My problem has always been determining which do and which don't.

I always questioned the old story about the Indians burying a small fish in the hole when they planted corn. I predug some holes for tomato plants this year. I placed the seedlings in each hole still in their containers. In a few cases I pressed them firmly into the soil. I left them like that for a few days before removing them, removing the container, and replanting. I noticed in one hole, I had pressed a large frog into the soil along with the plant. I planted the tomato on top of the frog. It grew better than the other tomato plants.

Ted
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731greener101
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Poor frog he gave his all for the tomato.I live near a large lake and fish there a lot.At the ramp I use to put my boat in and out there is a fish cleaning station that has half barrels to collect refuse.I have frequently thought of asking the owner(a friend) if I could remove some of the material.He returns the fish parts to the lake where turtles wait for the free meals.Greener

garden5
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Pretty good investigating, Ted. I planted 2 of my tomato plants in holes that had a banana peel place in them and it didn't seem to make much of a difference. The peels do work well with rosebushes, though.
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The Helpful Gardener
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I have found some lime in the soil to be beneficial with peppers for heat, maybe gypsum for a really stable source...

HG
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jal_ut
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Thanks for the clarification. I've heard that if you bury a match when you plant each pepper, the sulfur will make the plants grow better and the peppers hotter.

Personally, I think this is a bit of an old wive's tale. Anyone ever try this with any luck?
Yes. I have done that. Not just a match, but about ten of the book matches. I think it is for the phosphorous, not the sulphur. The peppers did well. I must confess I did it to all, so had none without the matches to compare.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

garden5
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The Helpful Gardener wrote:I have found some lime in the soil to be beneficial with peppers for heat, maybe gypsum for a really stable source...

HG
Do you put it directly in the hole or spread it over the general area before you plant?

How much do you use?

This is one I've never heard of.
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tedln
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The Helpful Gardener wrote:I have found some lime in the soil to be beneficial with peppers for heat, maybe gypsum for a really stable source...

HG
I've found the gypsum wall board pulverized into a powder works well. It also helps prevent blossom end rot. The older wall board works best because it had basically only gypsum and glue. The newer wall board has other components I prefer to not put in my garden. Don't use Chinese wall board because it has some really toxic stuff in it. To be really safe, simply buy some garden lime at the garden center.

Ted
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The Helpful Gardener
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Or pelleted gypsum... or plain old lime...

G5, I really never amend soil in a hole (ocassionally a sprinkle of compost). I broadcast lime on the surface and watered in; a surface app of gypsum pellets would work the same way...

HG
Scott Reil

garden5
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The Helpful Gardener wrote:Or pelleted gypsum... or plain old lime...

G5, I really never amend soil in a hole (ocassionally a sprinkle of compost). I broadcast lime on the surface and watered in; a surface app of gypsum pellets would work the same way...

HG
Oh, OK.

I've heard that you shouldn't lime unless you know what your ph is and even then, only if it's too low.

Do you agree with this, or do you think that an annual application of lime is beneficial regardless?
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