Bob9891
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Gardening Excuses

Hi everybody I am new to the forum but I live in New York City and am always pretty busy with my job but I'd like to grow some vegetables. I am thinking peppers (because I love spicy food) and some herbs.

However, I constantly find myself saying I don't have the time or the space and doubt whether I'll be able to grow anything and then I push it off.

I am wondering what other excuses people on this forum had before they started their vegetable garden and how you got by them? I am thinking that hearing your stories might help me get over the hump to just do it.

Thanks everybody I am excited to be a member!

Urban_Garden
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No space
No time
Don't know how


But excuses are excuses, and I came to the conclusion that I do have the space (though not much), I do have the time, and that I can learn. Now I don't think I will ever be able to stop gardening. :D
"Cultivators of the earth are the most virtuous and independant citizens."- Thomas Jefferson

TZ -OH6
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Crappy Dirt


BTW, hot peppers (habanero types et al) grow great in a 3-5 gal bucket of potting mix and can be trimmed and root pruned and down potted to overwintered as houseplants for an early start the next year.

sciencegal
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I don't think I've ever had an excuse. Where ever I've lived if there was a bare patch of ground I'd stick something in it.

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cherishedtiger
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No more excuses!

I had every excuse, and then started to make more as the process became increasingly difficult. Finally I said enough of this, threw up my garden and viola it started producing, ever since then I have thought of what else I can do. It went from I cant to oh yes I can! And now I am addicted to it, growing things outside, inside, in pots in the ground in raised beds... you name it...
Because all things need to be cherished
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USDA zone 8A (guess it changed... not sure why I was a 9!)

crobi13
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No room, don't know how, no time, no energy, wouldn't know where to start, my dogs need the room, my dogs would dig up the garden, no room to store the food once harvested

None of those excuses hold up today :lol:
Charlette
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applestar
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Too tired. No energy.
Still my excuses on some days. Oh and too hot to go outside.

So I say, I'll just go look around while the sun"s still behind those trees and the garden is in the shade.
... then I see that the yellow beans need picking, and having picked them, wonder how the green beans are doing
... While there, I notice that the cuke vines are trying to sneak out between the fence panels to the neighbor's side
... It turns out that I can't adjust the vines while holding the beans so I go back for a bowl or a basket, and wonder if the purple beans have flowered yet
... so I make a detour past the tomatoes, and realize that they've grown and need tying up, especially with the "scattered thunder showers" in the forecast (not that I believe we're going to get any of it, but just in case)
... then I think if THESE tomatoes need tying up, then what about the other ones on the other side of the house, and, now I've done it, I'm in whole another part of the garden :roll: :()

Before I know it, it's been hours, and I'm drenched in the sweltering heat. :lol: But, strangely, I feel energized. :D

Start by planning where you're going to put your garden, containers or in-ground... or raised beds. Consider the position of the sun now, in the spring, and later in the fall. Think about what crops would be suited to which part of the area you have available -- think micro-climate (a little more shade, reflected sun, etc.) and size of the plants. Research what should be planted at which time of the year, and how -- directly seed outside? Start seeds inside?

Now look at on-line seed catalogs and request free catalogs by mail if you like. Think about what you like to eat and what you'd like to share/serve to friends and family.

Find out what kind of soil is best and how you're going to get it. Think compost -- kitchen scraps and household paper? Why give them away to the garbage collector and recycling centers when they can feed your plants for free? vermicomposting? bokashi? Consider making your own. Read up on Aerated Compost Tea (ACT).

It's not too late! Grow something this season :wink: Think about getting some supplemental lights and growing something inside when the weather turns colder. (I keep saying I don't container garden, yet I have numerous containers of plants that can't stay outside in the winter. Many of them are citrus seedlings and tropical fruit seedlings and plants that I grew from the last something I ate. :wink:) I bring in rosemary plants and now will regularly bring in hot and possibly sweet peppers for the winter. 8)

pepper4
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Bob9891, Not alot of room, work full time and already have alot to do the squirrels will just get to them I don't know anything about gardening were some of my thoughts or excuses but deep down I wanted to plant my own veggies and went for it dispite these excuses. Last year was my first year. Had a small plot for gardening but did alot of container planting. After the first year I was really amazed watching my little plants grow some from seed and from from starters. All my excuses went away. I had to do it again and from my first year of mistakes and the help of many people I did better this year. Last year I was lucky if I got 6 peppers total but this year I have more then that on 1 plant. Got so excited about last year had to do it again to make this year better. I got the help, knowledgement and encouragement here. I am a city girl and never thought about how much work went into gardening. Just went to the store and bought my produce. Other then the thrill of watching the little guys grow I have come to appreciate the time and work that goes into produceing things some of us take for granted. Instead of finding excuses not to find reasons to do. Go for it. Nothing to loose and alot to gain. :) Sorry so long but alot to say :wink:
Bambi

Urban_Garden
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applestar wrote:Too tired. No energy.
Still my excuses on some days. Oh and too hot to go outside.

So I say, I'll just go look around while the sun"s still behind those trees and the garden is in the shade.
... then I see that the yellow beans need picking, and having picked them, wonder how the green beans are doing
... While there, I notice that the cuke vines are trying to sneak out between the fence panels to the neighbor's side
... It turns out that I can't adjust the vines while holding the beans so I go back for a bowl or a basket, and wonder if the purple beans have flowered yet
... so I make a detour past the tomatoes, and realize that they've grown and need tying up, especially with the "scattered thunder showers" in the forecast (not that I believe we're going to get any of it, but just in case)
... then I think if THESE tomatoes need tying up, then what about the other ones on the other side of the house, and, now I've done it, I'm in whole another part of the garden :roll: :()

Before I know it, it's been hours, and I'm drenched in the sweltering heat. :lol: But, strangely, I feel energized. :D

8)
Haha! I do the same thing! :D
"Cultivators of the earth are the most virtuous and independant citizens."- Thomas Jefferson

crobi13
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Urban_Garden wrote:
applestar wrote:Too tired. No energy.
Still my excuses on some days. Oh and too hot to go outside.

So I say, I'll just go look around while the sun"s still behind those trees and the garden is in the shade.
... then I see that the yellow beans need picking, and having picked them, wonder how the green beans are doing
... While there, I notice that the cuke vines are trying to sneak out between the fence panels to the neighbor's side
... It turns out that I can't adjust the vines while holding the beans so I go back for a bowl or a basket, and wonder if the purple beans have flowered yet
... so I make a detour past the tomatoes, and realize that they've grown and need tying up, especially with the "scattered thunder showers" in the forecast (not that I believe we're going to get any of it, but just in case)
... then I think if THESE tomatoes need tying up, then what about the other ones on the other side of the house, and, now I've done it, I'm in whole another part of the garden :roll: :()

Before I know it, it's been hours, and I'm drenched in the sweltering heat. :lol: But, strangely, I feel energized. :D

8)
Haha! I do the same thing! :D
So do I! It must be GADD, Gardners ADD ; )
Charlette
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hit or miss
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There is no good excuse not to garden! :lol:

Look up a few articles about the garbage that our "friends" use in the food they export to us and you'll have all of the motivation you'll need.

Get some buckets for the patio or balcony, dump some decent potting soil in them and grow some peppers!

William71
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TZ -OH6 wrote:BTW, hot peppers (habanero types et al) grow great in a 3-5 gal bucket of potting mix and can be trimmed and root pruned and down potted to overwintered as houseplants for an early start the next year.
Does this apply to jalapenos as well? I have some lovely ones growing, most successful thing in my garden right now. I'm sure I'll want more next year.

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farmerlon
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I never had any excuses, I just didn't have any interest in having a garden, until a few years ago.
I'm so glad I started growing a lot of my own food, I really enjoy it. :D

csvd87
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farmerlon wrote:I never had any excuses, I just didn't have any interest in having a garden, until a few years ago.
I'm so glad I started growing a lot of my own food, I really enjoy it. :D
Pretty much the same here, until Mothers Day this year we were wandering through a nursery and then I saw the pepper plants :) The next week I went and bought some starters.

Urban_Garden
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crobi13 wrote:
Urban_Garden wrote:
applestar wrote:Too tired. No energy.
Still my excuses on some days. Oh and too hot to go outside.

So I say, I'll just go look around while the sun"s still behind those trees and the garden is in the shade.
... then I see that the yellow beans need picking, and having picked them, wonder how the green beans are doing
... While there, I notice that the cuke vines are trying to sneak out between the fence panels to the neighbor's side
... It turns out that I can't adjust the vines while holding the beans so I go back for a bowl or a basket, and wonder if the purple beans have flowered yet
... so I make a detour past the tomatoes, and realize that they've grown and need tying up, especially with the "scattered thunder showers" in the forecast (not that I believe we're going to get any of it, but just in case)
... then I think if THESE tomatoes need tying up, then what about the other ones on the other side of the house, and, now I've done it, I'm in whole another part of the garden :roll: :()

Before I know it, it's been hours, and I'm drenched in the sweltering heat. :lol: But, strangely, I feel energized. :D

8)
Haha! I do the same thing! :D
So do I! It must be GADD, Gardners ADD ; )
We gardeners are joyfully insane! :lol:
"Cultivators of the earth are the most virtuous and independant citizens."- Thomas Jefferson

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applestar
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:wink:

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lorax
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For a while after moving, my biggest excuse was "I know jack-all about gardening in the tropics." Of course, then I moved to a house with established gardens, and learned the hard way that bananas like to be watered three times a day in our dry season. I'm originally Northern Canadian, and not having to stop gardening because of the weather was a real revelation. Now I just refer to my crops as cycles and with 4 years under my belt I know when to plant what, and what I can't grow at all to save my life.... :D

Bob9891
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Thanks for all the responses guys this forum seems pretty awesome. I think I am going to buy some pepper plants today and a bucket to put them in. I think I'll be able to grow them on the roof of my building. Do you poke holes in the bottom for drainage?

Also were there any gardening shows or books that got you all really motivated to start or keep gardening that I should start watching or pick up? Or anything else that was really motivating and maybe increased your gardening creativity?

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lorax
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Yes, definitely poke drainage holes in your pepper pots. I don't honestly know why pots without drainage are even sold... :evil:

For inspiration, I really like whatever my local botanical garden happens to be (ie: in Canada, the Royal Devonian got me hooked on edible landscaping. Here in Ecuador, the Quito BG has awesome "working gardens" using traditional Incan permaculture techniques, and the Loja BG has amazing intricate formal knot gardens made up entirely of edibles.) Most BGs have a great sense of layout and aesthetics even in veggie patches.

garden5
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Probably my main excuse was I didn't know enough to start. That's the biggest mistake you can make: waiting until you know everything.

First, you will never know everything.

Second, you will learn many many more things many many times faster when you actually do something rather than just read about it theoretically.

I've also found that I take away more when I read something, now that I've actually experienced the things I'm reading about, then when I would read something before I had actually tried it.

Just go for it, and learn all you can as go, you'll be surprised how much you will learn in just the first few months, years.
There's something new growing in the Helpful Gardener Forum! Become a part of it here!

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tomf
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I am a Hobbit gardening is what we do so no excuses here.

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applestar
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Have you ever seen photos (or actual) earth-shelter homes that people design with round portals like Hobbit Holes? 8) That's on my list of things for "if I ever win the lottery" :wink:

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farmerlon
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garden5 wrote:...
First, you will never know everything.

Second, you will learn many many more things many many times faster when you actually do something rather than just read about it theoretically.

I've also found that I take away more when I read something, now that I've actually experienced the things I'm reading about, then when I would read something before I had actually tried it. ...
So true... that's excellent advice.

tedln
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I usually end my days in the garden. Normally I spend a lot of time just watching as the sun moves below the horizon. When I finally go into the house, I am confident, every plant is either tucked into its cage, or all the dead leaves are removed and transferred to the compost, and the daily harvesting is complete.

When I get up in the morning, the garden is the first place I go with a cup of coffee. I just sit for awhile enjoying the cool fresh air of the morning. My dog usually starts barking after a few minutes reminding me that he hasn't had his morning cucumber yet. I am always amazed at all the things needing to be done when I thought every thing was perfect the evening before.

When the first frost arrives in November, I am usually ready to put the garden to sleep for the winter. I then start planning, working, and preparing for the spring garden. When I am cleaning the garden before the first snow, I always feel like I am cleaning the house after a great party.

There is never enough time to get it all done, but it is worth the effort.

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

LindsayArthurRTR
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TED,

You've just described my mornings and evenings, for the past few months, to the TEE! I only have inside Kit-Tays but the neighbor's dog runs free and waits for me every morning by the garden, bed head and all. I don't feed her stuff out of my garden because I don't want her taking her fill as I don't have any fencing. I do let her have the rest of my coffee, and she loves it. I don't know why I even take it out there, I usually only get a few sips before I find something that requires two hands :roll: :wink: These are my favorite times of the day...I wouldn't have it any other way :D
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tedln
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LindsayArthur,

My mornings and evenings are reserved for watching and contemplating. I always get to finish my cup of coffee and sometimes return to the house for a second cup which I will finish in the garden. Any two handed work is started around noon when the temperature is close to 100 degrees f. I fold one of those large bandannas into a sweat band and put it on my head. I can't stand to work on stuff when salty sweat is running into my eyes.

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

tedln
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applestar wrote:Have you ever seen photos (or actual) earth-shelter homes that people design with round portals like Hobbit Holes? 8) That's on my list of things for "if I ever win the lottery" :wink:
Applestar,

I had friends who built a geodesic dome house with the hobbit windows. They put a really large one over the top of the house so they could lay in bed and watch the movement of the stars and moon as they drifted off to sleep. I didn't like the house because it looked like a huge golf ball on the outside, but the inside was beautiful with three living levels and a winding staircase against the outside wall. As you climbed the staircase, you could look out the hobbit windows (they looked like large portholes on a ship) and you always had a different view as you climbed.

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

Bob9891
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Thanks for all the tips guys. I picked up some jalapeno plants today and some cherry tomato plants for some salads.

Time to get started!

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