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applestar
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CABBAGES - What happens if you wait too long to harvest?

Aside from splitting from suddenly getting a lot of water, what can happen to cabbages if you wait too long to harvest? I have a few heads that are still smallish but am thinking this is as big as they're going to get. Rather than try to keep them going, should I just harvest them? (I have to get ready to PROCESS -- I'm thinking sauerkraut but it's my first attempt so I've been dragging my feet....)

Is there any indicator that says "THAT'S IT, GOTTA HARVEST NOW!" ?

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soil
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if you wait too long it will flower, i have two going to seed right now.
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applestar
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Well, that makes sense! Did the heads show signs of unraveling and "conifying" like with head lettuce before they bolted?

TWC015
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You should probably harvest the cabbages if they aren't growing anymore. I left one after it quit growing and it just sat there, not growing or dying.

It should not flower if the plant is in its first year. Cabbages need a cold period to flower (temperatures lower than 50 for a period of time).

TWC015
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I let some Brussels Sprouts overwinter and the sprouts that were tightly closed became longer but couldn't open to let the seed stalks out.

If your cabbages have a tightly closed head, the seed stalk will probably not be able to get out (unless you cut a hole for it) and it will just make the head more conic.

I don't think your plants will flower at this time of year; if they were exposed to enough cold earlier in the year, they would have already flowered. Now if you leave them outside all winter and they live, they would definitely flower since cabbages are biennials.

rkunsaw
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If you will twist the heads a quarter turn after the are full size, it will slow the growth enough to keep them from splitting so you can leave them in the ground longer.I've only tried this once,but it seems to work.
Larry
I started with nothing and still have most of it!!!

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applestar
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:!: I remember reading about that 1/4 turn trick. I'll try that with some of them to see how that works. :wink:

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jal_ut
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Around here, they are sure to split then the earwigs get in them and make a mess. If you have room in a refrigerator, they will keep a long time refrigerated.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

hit or miss
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Saurkraut is easy! Go for it. We've already canned 74 pints this year. The hard part is waiting for it to ferment.

rkunsaw
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hit or miss wrote:Saurkraut is easy! Go for it. We've already canned 74 pints this year. The hard part is waiting for it to ferment.
If you can kraut doesn't that destroy the benefits of fermentation.We make kraut every year and I would like to can some so it will last all year but I wonder if canning is the best option.Has anyone tried freezing kraut?
Larry
I started with nothing and still have most of it!!!

hit or miss
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Larry
I would imagine freezing would turn it to slime. I'm willing to can it because I don't like to dip it out of the green stuff in the bucket when I want to eat some. I also don't have a cellar to keep it in and the wife won't tolerate the smell in the house.

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applestar
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That's the thing isn't it? I don't have a cellar either. I've often thought about investing in a wine cellar unit to use as a "root cellar"....

Yep, wacky ideas -- I'm full of them. :wink: :lol:

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BrianSkilton
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Its been pretty hot here and none of my cabbages have flowered. I harvested 3 savoy cabbages, man they get HUGE! Of course I harvested napa as well. I'll throw a picture of the savoy on here, They took the heat no problem, so that's good news for anyone that is in a pretty hot area in the summer. Also the standard white is taking the heat and so is the napa. However the napa is more prone to getting worms. Can't wait to make a sausage stew with the savoy and a casserole with it...

Anyone else have a problem with those stupid cabbage whites? Those white moths, ugh I see like 5 everyday. I've killed 20 already. It's a little funny how I kill them. I take the hose and blast them with the water and then smash them, its very rewarding :twisted: Also a orange winged (tips) moth thats black and orange. They go to everyone of my cabbages have to continue to kill the eggs they lay, kind of annoying...
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