The Helpful Gardener
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Is that chick peas in general Opa, or do you have a specific strain?

opabinia51
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The chickpeas that I have are a particular strain that I acquired through a seed exchange with a fellow gardener from Sweden for some Citron Melon seeds. Just planted them yesterday actually. 8)
The seeds themselves are not ancient but, the strain apparently is ancinet. (At least, according to the guy that I traded with.) :)

I have been reading about Legumes and apparently Chickpeas area legume. So Scott, are all legumes by definition harbours for Nitrogen Fixing Bacteria? :?
I read the other day that it is nodules in the roots of legumes that harbour the bacteria though, when pulling up my beans at the end of the year, I have noticed that only some of them have large bulbous roots. (Like Scarlett Runner Beans)

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I thought it was the family in general, but I'll have to check that...

opabinia51
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Well with this strain of brown chickpea (at least according to the guy that I got them from) they have been grown in some city that starts with an "A" (that really narrows it down :roll: ) in Mesoptamia for hundreds of years.
Being that these are brown chickpeas and not the white ones that everyone buys in the supermarket, I am assuming that it is just this strain. But, like I said; I have done no reasearch on this and am just taking the guys word for it.

Anyway, I planted them the day before yesterday (four rows!!!) and am looking forward to a bountiful harvest of both chickpeas and a plethora of dried beans this year. :D
Last edited by opabinia51 on Thu Apr 28, 2005 11:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

The Helpful Gardener
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Better alert everyone downwind this fall... :lol:

opabinia51
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Here is an answer to a question that I asked some time ago:


Q: Are chickpeas a legume?

ie) Do they attract Nitrogen fixing bacteria to their roots?


A: Yes. :idea:


So.... Yes, Chickpeas are legumes. There you have it folks. If you have nutrient depleted soil or just want to infuse your soil with some Nitrogen; plant peas, beans and (Yes) chickpeas. 8)

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And Crotalus is right about the seedsavers; good bunch, that...

opabinia51
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More on Beans:


Cover crops, everyone (or at least; every organically minded gardner) is always looking for the better winter cover crop(s). Well, I recently discovered Lima Beans. Yes, according to an organic gardening book that I recently purchased (5 dollars off plus a 10 percent discout. :) .. had to throw that one in there :wink: ) Lima Beans are a great cold weather crop to plant and of course, being a legume; the bacteria that associate with the roots of Lima Beans will Fix nitrogen and any excess nitrates that the plants don't use, go to the soil.
Also, the bonus is that in the spring you will have a crop of Lima Beans that you can eat!

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Some think that's a bonus and some do not... :wink:

Scott

opabinia51
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I'm curious as to why someone would think that a cover crop like Fava (not Lima but, I think that lima are actually a type of Fava Bean, correct me if I am wrong) Beans would not be good? Or is it something obvious like, well, the fact that they are beans? (HINT HINT WINK WINK)

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Lima beans are verboten at my house (Mama don't like...)

hg

opabinia51
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Really? Oh, that's to bad. I guess it is different strokes for different folks! I guess you could just do peas as a winter crop, though, I don't know how well they would do in the snow. Fava beans (apparently... at least according to that book that I have been toting) do just fine.

I actually have shelling peas as a green manure in my raised beds right now.

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