User avatar
cherishedtiger
Green Thumb
Posts: 339
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 5:10 pm
Location: Sacramento, California

ghost chilies...

Ok, so my husband whose father was born and raised in Singapore loves hot stuff. He heard about the ghost chili, otherwise known as the Hot Bhut Jolokia. Being an avid gardener and loving wife I actually found some for sale so I bought them for him. I have heard they are almost impossible to grow, and well to handle with basically a hazmat suit on. This being known, does anyone have any experience with these? Can they be treated like any other pepper/chili and expect to grow or is there something special they need specifically?

I cant seem to find much so I thought I would ask you all as this has always been the best place for answers!

Thanks! :D
Because all things need to be cherished
*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*
USDA zone 8A (guess it changed... not sure why I was a 9!)

User avatar
BrianSkilton
Green Thumb
Posts: 547
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 3:59 am
Location: South Dakota

Well, I got a free pack of seeds a while back with another order. I never planted them, the problem is I never have tried them and to be quite honest I don't know if I would want to (to hot). I wonder how they came to be, were they some work of a lot of crossing? Anyway I have successfully grown a ton of hot peppers including: starfish, bishops crown, habs etc. I'm sure you could grow them without little problem just make sure they don't get to much water.

by the way I love Singapore, the food their looks so darn good. I believe there is a hawker-center at every corner ;). So goood...
Why buy produce when you can grow it?
-Nick

User avatar
cherishedtiger
Green Thumb
Posts: 339
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 5:10 pm
Location: Sacramento, California

Not really sure how they came around and I know for sure I am not going to try them! WAYYY TO HOT!!! But well the hubby wants to!

I am doing pretty good at growing all other sorts of peppers, so hopefully this will do well too. I will post pics and let everyone know how they are doing... heck I may even snap a few pics when he takes his first bite!!
Because all things need to be cherished
*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*
USDA zone 8A (guess it changed... not sure why I was a 9!)

garden5
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 3062
Joined: Fri Aug 07, 2009 9:40 pm
Location: ohio

cherishedtiger wrote:Not really sure how they came around and I know for sure I am not going to try them! WAYYY TO HOT!!! But well the hubby wants to!

I am doing pretty good at growing all other sorts of peppers, so hopefully this will do well too. I will post pics and let everyone know how they are doing... heck I may even snap a few pics when he takes his first bite!!
Make sure you snap the picture when his face is just the right shade of purple :lol:.

This is my first time growing peppers from seed and among them are the bhut jolokia.

Grow them just like you would any other hot pepper. They may take as long as 30 day to germinate, however, so don't give up if you don't seen any sign right away. Mine were up in about 2 weeks.

One thing I've noticed is that they tend to be a little slower than the other hot peppers with both growth and fruiting. While all my plants are starting to set-fruit, the bhuts are a little smaller and don't have any flowers yet.

If you want them to be their utmost hottest they can be, don't harvest them until they are totally red.
There's something new growing in the Helpful Gardener Forum! Become a part of it here!

TZ -OH6
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 2097
Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2008 11:27 pm
Location: Mid Ohio

There is a good article on the New Mexico State University Chilipepper Institute site, and you can google "worlds hottest pepper".
There is also a bit about growing it seed sites.

I know that there are at least one or two on these web sites


https://www.ringoffire.net/


The information you want is out there, but this forum doesn't have a high concentration of hard core hot pepper collectors.

User avatar
cherishedtiger
Green Thumb
Posts: 339
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 5:10 pm
Location: Sacramento, California

Thanks!

Pictures will be posted!!! I got some potting soil yesterday but it was just too hot to do anything outside! I hope to plant them soon!

Thanks for the links and advice, now I can tell my husband to be patient while they grow... :roll:
Because all things need to be cherished
*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*
USDA zone 8A (guess it changed... not sure why I was a 9!)

dave103069
Full Member
Posts: 42
Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2010 2:03 pm
Location: New Jersey

I've been want to grow them but can't find them anywhere. I found a couple sites on the internet with seeds that I may order them for next year. I wish there was a place near me that had the starter plants ready to go..

They are hot that is for sure. Not for the weak at heart.. where gloves when handling even when touching the peppers on the plants.

From what I read they grow more like a bush and do tend to take a little longer than most peppers but can be grown pretty much the same way and in the same conditions..

Hope this helps - take pictures on the prgress and of course your husbands face. First bite his eyes will open wide from the shock. then a couple minutes later the throat starts to swell and then the sweat beads start - then comes the coloring of the face, more sweat and then the stomach burn. this lingers for about 20 minutes or so and gets prgresevy worse until everything pretty much becomes numb then you can eat a little more and start the process over again..

Tate
Cool Member
Posts: 62
Joined: Wed May 19, 2010 6:39 pm
Location: Houston

I read that they can even burn your hands THROUGH the gloves. I haven't yet, but will probably try growing some one day.

Tate

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27731
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

After successfully overwintering A Jalapeno plant and a sweet pepper plant, I decided to grow some hot peppers and keep them as perennials. This takes care of the late maturing issues. There are at least two varieties I'm growing that I don't expect to see fruit this year (neither are BJ though).

From what I 've read, overwintered hot peppers will start fruiting early next season.

Return to “Vegetable Gardening Forum”