greg1186
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Location: Vernon, New Jersey

what bug is this??

its on my potato... is it bad?

[img]https://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y223/GREG111186/2010-06-14151422.jpg[/img]

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Kisal
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:lol: First, I thought it was a moth, but it's not. Then I decided it was Calopteron terminale, the End Band Net-wing. But finally, I came up with Caenia dimidiata, because the antennae match better.

Here is a link Bugguide's page about it:

https://bugguide.net/node/view/21790
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

greg1186
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Joined: Tue Jun 08, 2010 10:18 pm
Location: Vernon, New Jersey

thanks for the ID... but it doesnt say if its good or bad or not haha... do you know?

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rainbowgardener
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Very interesting, never saw or heard of it:

net-winged beetle:

any of some 2,800 species of soft-bodied, brightly coloured, predominately tropical beetles (insect order Coleoptera) whose wing covers, or elytra, are broader at the tip than at the base and are characterized by a raised network of lines, or veins. The adults feed either on plant juices or on other insects and can easily be seen as they fly slowly between plants or crawl on flowers. The bold colouring of orange and black or blue probably warns predators of their acidic, burning taste. Larvae feed on wet rotting wood and are often found in high numbers. https://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/409917/net-winged-beetle


predominately tropical means most of the species are, but presumably not yours in NJ!

sounds like they are basically beneficial in the garden:

Netwinged beetles-Family Lycidae. Only 50 species of netwinged beetles are known in North America. The adults of these soft-winged beetles are somewhat similar in appearance to fireflies and soldier beetles, but have a network of raised veins on the elytra (wing covers). They are active in the day and feed on juices from decaying plant material or occasionally on other insects. The larvae feed on a diversity of soft-bodied insects and snails or slugs.

https://www.entomology.wisc.edu/mbcn/fea411.html

I'm in favor of anything that eats slugs!

speaking of which on the same page it mentions that firefly larvae also eat slugs. Given how many fireflies we have, how could it be that we still have lots of slugs?!

Thanks for figuring this one out, Kisal!
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

greg1186
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Posts: 60
Joined: Tue Jun 08, 2010 10:18 pm
Location: Vernon, New Jersey

speaking of slugs... i had slugs on my potatoes last year and have seen a few this year... i leave a tuna can filled with beer out 24/7 and they never go for it!! why??

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engineeredgarden
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It's a banded net wing beetle. Completely harmless, as it feeds on dead plant tissue.

EG

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Zapatay
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How do you know all this stuff Kisal? what the heck.

I wont play trivia with you...ever.

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rainbowgardener
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Kisal knows a whole ton, but she is also really good at keying things out using the on-line guides.

The bug guide https://bugguide.net/node/view/3/bgpage is a very cool one. You can ID the guy in the photo yourself. Go to the above page.

It starts with phylum arthropod. We know by looking at it that this guy is an insect (and the pictures would help you know that if you weren't sure), so click on class insecta insects.

That takes you to a set of 7 pages IDing the orders of insects with pictures. By clicking through the pages, you find on p. 4 order coleoptera beetles.

Click on that and there's just one page of suborders. The pictures that are closest to our guy are suborder polyphaga (eats many things!) scarab, leaf, snout and other beetles.

Click on that and there's a set of 3 pages of superfamilies. Click through til you find the one that looks most like ours: superfamily elateroidia click, firefly and soldier beetles on p2

Click on that to 3 pages of families. on page 2 , immediately recognizable is our net-winged beetle.

Very cool, isn't it!! (Sorry, Kisal, don't mean to distract from your mystique. You were the one that showed me this very cool site and you are very good at it)
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

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