MrsKimmen
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Joined: Thu May 13, 2010 7:50 pm
Location: Southern Michigan

Starting Veggie Garden from Seeds

So we have done a veggie garden for the past 4 years, always buying flats of small veggie plants to start with. This year we decided to start them from seed. We planted the Tomato's and Pepper's as Plants though, but everything else...(Cucumbers, carrots, Zucchini, Lettuce, green beans, peas, and corn..) we planted the seeds directly in to the garden. We have never done it this way before and I am just wondering how it compares... planting seeds vs small plants?? Do they grow as fast as the plants and make for a good harvest? Any tips or thoughts would be great! Thanks!
Mel

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supagirl277
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Joined: Sun May 09, 2010 7:08 pm
Location: Utah Hardiness Zone: 6b

Theres always a higher chance of the seed not developing into this amazing plant than if you just bought one. When you buy the plant, at least it gives you the security that it will indeed grow, because it already has. Growing with seed is just a little more difficult especially with the melon like veggies I've found.

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rainbowgardener
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Location: TN/GA 7b

I start almost everything (except trees and shrubs!) from seed. I love it and I think with experience you can have way more and better plants that way than buying plants. There is a huge range of varieties of seed available including exotics that you would never find as plants. You will know how your plant has been treated from the beginning. There is less risk of disease (late blight in tomatoes was greatly spread last year by infected plants from giant merchandizers).

But it does take a little knowledge, experience, and trial and error to get it right! Timing and knowing what the different kinds of seeds/ plants individually need is important. So even if you run into a few problems this year, keep at it, you are learning!
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jal_ut
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Location: Northern Utah Zone 5

I grow somewhere around 30 varieties in my garden. Most are started from seed planted in the garden where it will grow. Tomatoes and peppers I buy nursery plants. Onions from sets, plants or seed.

One thing to watch is that the new seedlings don't get devoured by bugs, snails, slugs or birds.

Yes, good advice to read the seed packet for tips on the culture of each variety. You can also do some research online on the culture of varieties. Growing a garden is very rewarding. Good Luck!
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

garden5
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Location: ohio

You are right on with your seed selection. All of those crops can be grown direct-sown in the ground. You will be able to get a feel for what has to be planted when as you grown, observer, and grow some more.

Great luck on your from-seed garden![/u]
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scot29
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Joined: Sun Mar 28, 2010 1:03 pm
Location: zone 4

This is exactly how I plant my garden. I buy tomato & pepper plants from the nursery, and I direct seed everything else. Good advice to watch for pests attacking the seedlings & keeping the seeds moist, but not waterlogged.
To answer your question about seeds growing as fast & yielding as much, in my experience, seeds are better. One example: my first year I did buy a few more seedlings, one being cucumbers. After 2 weeks or so I decided I wanted more cukes, so I direct seeded a few hills. It wasn't long before the seeds caught up & passed the store bought cukes. The yield was about the same, but the development was much faster.



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