User avatar
farmerlon
Green Thumb
Posts: 671
Joined: Fri Feb 12, 2010 4:42 pm
Location: middle Tennessee

rkunsaw wrote:We grew ruby queen corn several years ago.The seed co. sent a white corn with it.They said ruby queen didn't pollinate well and to plant every other row with the white corn.Had a good crop of the ruby queen and the white and they were both really good.
Good to know, thanks.
I always grow several plots of Silver Queen corn every year; so, I will be sure to mix some of that in with the Ruby Queen.
Thanks for the "heads up".

garden5
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 3062
Joined: Fri Aug 07, 2009 9:40 pm
Location: ohio

Well, I'll be trying out some long season beets (they're suppoesed to get hugge), bhut jolokia hot pepper (extremely hot), and argonaut squash (think giant-sized butternut). I, too, like to try something new each year.
There's something new growing in the Helpful Gardener Forum! Become a part of it here!

Hispoptart
Senior Member
Posts: 224
Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2010 10:46 pm
Location: Rangley, CO

I've got a good one for you, how about cukalopes? Never heard of them? DH and I didn't till we grew some. First year garden we planted cukes and cantalopes, the weren't any where near each other. The 2 year we had what appeared to be a volenteer cuke growing so we let it go, well what we got was a cross between a cuke and cantalope so we called the cukalopes. Let me tell you they were great, they grew to the size and shape of a small childs football, were crisp and sweet. I'm hoping for another volenteer this year.

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

well what we got was a cross between a cuke and cantalope so we called the cukalopes.
Sorry Hispoptart, this is not possible. Two different species. You most have something else going on there. Another melon, nutrient deficiency, something else. :?

Hispoptart
Senior Member
Posts: 224
Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2010 10:46 pm
Location: Rangley, CO

Well we grew them and ate them so I would have to say it was possible, They tasted more like cukes, but had the sweetness of a cantalope, and when allowed to fully ripen they had a hint of cantolope color on the in side, the out side was green like a cuke, but was a bit furry like a cantolope is when it's green before it mauters. the other things we had growing were zucs, butternuts and water melon.....Hmm maybe the water melon? But did taste like that, tasted the sweetness of cantolopes. I am going to look and see if I have any pics from last year of them.

Joyfirst
Green Thumb
Posts: 361
Joined: Wed Feb 03, 2010 11:45 pm
Location: Southern California

Cucalope sounds fun. Nature is full of secrets, you never know - maybe it worked somehow. Did you save the seeds?
I am raising West Burr gherkins, rainbow chard and carrots, purple bellpeppers, alpine strawberies from seed(and just today I bought some more -pineapple crush variety, which has very good taste - paid over six dollars for a pack-most I ever paid for a pack of seeds.) I have jicama seeds, but I am still hesitant to put them in, because it is a funny plant - keeps vining and putting in new roots - and my plot is small. And I already have a moon and stars watermelon growing in there. Golden nugget squash too. Oh, yes, kiwano melon, which is more of the cucumber.
I have bunch of greens like purslane, miner's lettuce, mache and others which I didn't put in yet. I am also waiting for the seeds from tomatoegirl - new zealand spinach, mexican sour gherkins(they taste like pickles straight from the vine).
Can't you tell I love weird fun stuff. :lol:
Oh, almost foprgot my chickweed- I love to juice it and always make sure to leave some, so it can grow back. Does anyone have lambsquarter seeds-for some reason it doesn't grow in my garden naturaly. :cry:

Hispoptart
Senior Member
Posts: 224
Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2010 10:46 pm
Location: Rangley, CO

no didn't save the seed, but we are going to try and recreat it on purpose thia year, save seeds and see what we get next year, no pics either :(

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 28035
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Another possibility is that the cantaloupe was a hybrid, since most melon seeds are F1's.

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

Yes, of coarse it is :oops:

Hispoptart
Senior Member
Posts: 224
Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2010 10:46 pm
Location: Rangley, CO

so maybe they were cukalopes then?

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

No, The cantoloupe was a Hybrid, so the seeds don't breed true. :wink:

Google Hybrid seeds for more information.

Hispoptart
Senior Member
Posts: 224
Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2010 10:46 pm
Location: Rangley, CO

well I am going to grow them again and the I can prove that it is true

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

hehe thank you for the laugh. I'm not making fun of you. I can just hear you typing. :P

So this is a two year project. Plant the same cantaloupe, then take seeds from the fruit and plant them 2011.

This could be fun. Maybe I should try this with my hybrid ducks. :shock:

garden5
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 3062
Joined: Fri Aug 07, 2009 9:40 pm
Location: ohio

Another interesting thing is the dicon (I probably misspelled that) radish. I've never grown any, but when fully grown, they look more like a club than a radish. Seriously, they're huge.
There's something new growing in the Helpful Gardener Forum! Become a part of it here!

Hispoptart
Senior Member
Posts: 224
Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2010 10:46 pm
Location: Rangley, CO

Both plants are cucurbits, if the daddy was the the cantolope and the mommy was a heirloom cucumber (which it was ) Then yes viable seeds can be produced, I will let a couple of my volenteers grow to see if they may be one again this year, but other then that this will be a 2 year project, and you may soon after that see them in your grocerie store :)

rkunsaw
Senior Member
Posts: 249
Joined: Wed Apr 28, 2010 3:01 pm
Location: Clarksville,Arkansas

Kelly_Guy,I'm sure glad you started this post.I'm getting a lot of ideas to try next year.Thanks.
I started with nothing and still have most of it!!!

Joyfirst
Green Thumb
Posts: 361
Joined: Wed Feb 03, 2010 11:45 pm
Location: Southern California

Hispoptart wrote:Both plants are cucurbits, if the daddy was the the cantolope and the mommy was a heirloom cucumber (which it was ) Then yes viable seeds can be produced, I will let a couple of my volenteers grow to see if they may be one again this year, but other then that this will be a 2 year project, and you may soon after that see them in your grocerie store :)
It might! In grocery stores just if they store well, but if they are delicious, maybe you can sell seed to seed companies and we will buy them. :D

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

hispoptart,

Can you please give me the name of the cucumber and the name of the melon you grew. I want to look them up to see if they are F1 Hybrids.

If anything, you have a F2 Hybrid seed.
Last edited by DoubleDogFarm on Mon May 10, 2010 2:54 am, edited 1 time in total.

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

Some information on F1 Hybrids and the source it came from :wink:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F1_hybrid

[quote]Production of F1 hybrids
[edit] In plants
Crossing two genetically different plants produces a hybrid seed (plant) by means of controlled pollination. To produce consistent F1 hybrids, the original cross must be repeated each season. As in the original cross, in plants this is usually done through controlled hand-pollination, and explains why F1 seeds can often be expensive. F1 hybrids can also occur naturally, a prime example being peppermint, which is not a species evolved by cladogenesis or gradual change from a single ancestor, but a sterile stereotyped hybrid of watermint and spearmint. Unable to produce seeds, it propagates through the vining spread of its own root system.

In agronomy, the term “F1 hybridâ€

Hispoptart
Senior Member
Posts: 224
Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2010 10:46 pm
Location: Rangley, CO

I don't remember the name but when I go to get the plants next week I will let you know as long as the have the same ones. I know the cucumber was a bush variety.

Kelly_Guy
Full Member
Posts: 26
Joined: Fri Apr 23, 2010 2:16 am
Location: Louisiana

rkunsaw wrote:Kelly_Guy,I'm sure glad you started this post.I'm getting a lot of ideas to try next year.Thanks.
:) Me too! Thanks to all who have replied...a lot of fun ideas.

I will add one to the list, though I am not sure how uncommon it is. A friend gave me a rainbow tomato plant. Based one what I read, the tomatoes can be different colors on each plot from orange to pink to red and be very large. The Amish grow them according to the article.

Kelly

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 28035
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

I posted a list on [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=133007#133007]this thread[/url], that I just realized are mostly kind of unusual varieties of vegs.

Of these, I grew Cherokee Long Ear popcorn last year. I never put as much work into growing corn as I should, so mine might have been just smaller, but the kernels popped up to 1/2 the size of store-bought popcorn. However, the flavor is nuttier and superior. Attractive red/violet-streaked plants and tassles/silks. Also grew the Burgundy Red Okra -- beautiful mahogany red plants with yellow flowers. I'm not a real fan of okra as a veg, but I liked it. Last year's colorful potato was Red Cranberry -- gorgeous purplish dark green foliage and sweet lilac colored flowers. I'm hoping for a similar show from these other ones. Grew Azuki beans two years ago -- yellow pods for a nice contrast.

Return to “Vegetable Gardening Forum”