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Zapatay
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Time between peas & cucumber?

I planted a nice size area of sugar snaps last week - I'm wondering what are my chances by the time the peas are harvested, am I able to use the same spot for cucumbers?

I planted sugar snaps later in the spring/early summer and they weren't too happy with the heat - Cucumbers loved it and grew fabulously.

Do you think I'll be able to harvest my peas in time to see my cucumber vines working their way up?

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hendi_alex
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Each year, when my sugar snaps are within a couple weeks of the end of their harvest, I remove just enough plants to open up a small planting area. Then I plant a tomato or seed some cucumbers in that small area. The replacement plant is thriving by the time I'm ready to cut or pull the pea vines which become fodder for the compost pile.

I do the same thing in the corn patch. I leave most of the corn plants up, just removing enought to provide a planting area. Then I seed squash and/or cucumbers. Those seedlings get the benefit of left over fertilizer and mulch, plus they get some shading as the hotter part of the summer in getting near. This year I may follow the corn with a planting of green beans or edamame.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

TZ -OH6
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I wouldn't worry about it, plant the cucumbers a little in front and let them climb up and over the peas. Just make sure that the cucumber tendrils grab onto something structural every once in a while and not just pea stems.

kylie77
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Ooh thanks sooooooo much for this question! I have no space, and am trying to plant as much as possible. I'm now going to use my pea space for cucumbers. Is there anything else that will work that way? I'm still figuring out the best planting times for things. Thanks again for the great tip! I now don't have to worry about space for my cucumbers!

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hendi_alex
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I plant a succession of crops in most every space. My kale is starting to bolt, so I removed a few plants and placed a tomato in one spot. Opened up another two areas in the kale and will plant tomato plants there as well. In another couple of weeks, I'll plant beans between my lettuce plants, such that about the time the lettuce is bolting and turning bitter, small bean plants will already be in the space, and with a nice head start. I plant arugula, lettuce, carrots between my garlic plants, but a couple of weeks before harvest of the garlic, will plant beans, cucumbers, or squash in those beds. We continuously rotate the use of all available space from late spring through late fall, such that planting beds are in continuous production throughout the entire year here in zone 8.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

SaulsX
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hendi_alex, good to see somebody in my neighborhood.

I'm glad I came across this thread. I'm looking for ideas to maximize space since I have a small container garden and a makeshift raised bed.
Last edited by SaulsX on Wed Apr 14, 2010 9:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Joyfirst
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Thank you, guys, I can use these ideas as well, because I have a small garden plot. :D

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hendi_alex
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I really enjoy container gardening and also gardening in raised beds that are not in contact with the soil, essentially large containers.

My soil is very sandy, filled with bad nemotodes, devoid of organic matter and earthworms. For years I tried to build the soil and still work at it, but a mix of synthetic soil, compost, and ammendments just seems to produce great instant results. Whereas building this poor soil requires decades of effort, and then there is still the issue with the roots from many deciduous trees.

I've got unlimited space, so that give me lots of flexibility. Over the years, I've had great luck growing herbs, strawberries, bell pepper, egg plant, tomatoes, and cucumbers in containers. The two biggest issues relate to water. The plants need a steady supply of moisture, but have to avoid soggy, sour soil that will rot the roots. I find that conditioning the soil with perlite is very helpful for drainage. I also find, especially during the hotter summer months, that most potted plants do much better when placed in morning only sun.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
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barbelle
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Handi-alex

I am gardening in pots on my apartment patio. This is my first attempt at a garden and I think it is going pretty well. I would like to have more plants going and was wondering how to do that. It looks like rotating things like you said would work great!!

What kind of containers are you using. How large are they??

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hendi_alex
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Most of my container grown plants are in one gallon or three gallon plastic nursery pots. For the deck and porch areas I used a variety of mostly Vietnamese pottery. I have lots of strawberry plants and herbs growing in rectangular plastic trays that were bought at Lowes several years ago. Those are about 12 inches by 12 inches by 30 inches. Finally, I have also construct some rustic, but decorative planters from treated decking and 2 x 4's. Those containers generally hold 2-3 cubic feet of soil.

Most of my edible plants are not grown immediately around the house, so for those the appearance of the container is not an issue. If I was growing my food crops on a patio or the deck, I would have to rethink my container strategy. I think that I would lean toward home constructed wooden boxes and unglazed clay containers, but would really have to give that some consideration.
Last edited by hendi_alex on Wed Jun 02, 2010 7:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

garden5
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When planting in pots, it's almost always better to make your own mixture of potting soil rather than just use dirt. It just compacts and the plants slowly die. One thing I'll also mention is to check them for water frequently as pots dry out way faster than an in-ground garden.
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jal_ut
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Zapatay, Those folks further South get a much longer growing season than you do there. We cannot expect to raise two crops the way they do because we don't have the frost free days to do it.

I think that if you plant peas in March, they should be blooming now, and you could plant some cukes in front of them now. The peas will then be done before the cukes are looking for a place to climb. Cukes planted in early June will do well for you.

Since you just planted the peas a week ago, I think you have a real conflict if you plant cukes next to them at this time. The cukes grow very fast, and will be severe competition for the peas.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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Zapatay
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Thanks Jal
Yes -I planted the peas early April. My peas are well over 3 feet tall - super strong... no pods yet.

Great on the cucumbers - I'll plant them this week.

Muchas gracias

tylianna
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I had a space that I planned on using for cucumbers, with trellis ready and all. I knew that I couldn't plant my cucumbers until the 2nd week of May for my zone, so on a whim, I bought some snap peas and planted it on the opposite side of my trellis. I now have some tall pole beans growing, and I have cucumbers growing on the other side.

It helps if the beans are on the sunny side of the trellis since the cukes will block the sun! I have mine on the opposite side, since I didn't plan to do this. I still expect to have a harvest of peas before the cukes get too big.



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