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Ozark Lady
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Alex, I planted some from last year, that were sprouting, they are coming up well.
If they should make small bulbs this spring, when I get ready to replant them this fall, would I still separate them, or just plant it whole?

I also planted some of the tiny little bulbil seeds, they are really small, will I just plant them whole in the fall?
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tedln
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Alex,

The elephant garlic is about all I see in our big chain groceries. I've even asked the produce manager where they display their garlic bulbs and they point me to the elephant garlic. I do shop some local Mexican groceries because they usually have a better fresh meat and vegetable selection than the chains. They also have garlic bulbs which are about 1/2 size of the elephant garlic. I don't know the variety, but they have a purple neck and have an excellent garlic flavor. My problem is the fact that we only make the special trip to the Mexican grocery a couple of times per year. Their fresh veggies are much better and much cheaper. Last winter, I was buying yellow squash at the chains for $1.69 per lb. This year, it was $2.59 per lb. at the chains and only $1.69 at the Mexican markets. They also sell limes for 15 for $1.00. Great buys.

At the current price of yellow squash, I figure we will grow about $400.00 worth for $2,00 worth of seed.

Ted
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tn_veggie_gardner
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Alex: Sent you an e-mail. Thank you for your kind offer. =)

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applestar
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About the effects on the digestive system...

I don't remember personally eating a quantity of garlic enough to have problems, but it's a by-product of the excellent anti-bacterial anti-fungal action of the garlic. You've wiped out your gastro-intestinal flora and fauna. Same as what can happen from taking antibiotics.

I suspect stronger reaction from raw garlic than cooked until creamy garlic like Ozark Lady describes. It's also a matter of acclimating your system and promoting resistant strains. In other words, start out with smaller amounts of garlic, then increase gradually.

If this happens to you, lay off the garlic and eat lacto-fermented foods like yogurt, sour cream, cottage cheese, home made type sauerkraut and barrel pickles, miso, kimchee, etc. to re-establish your system. Eat whole grain and oatmeal to provide the fiber to sustain them.

rusticbeds
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garlic in zone6-7

Alex, your garlic is beautiful! How deep are your beds and what is your most used mulch? Fish emulsion foliar spray?
My 12" deep bed, with 20 or so varieties, is now popping sunwards thru 4-6" of straw mulch. I will begin soil drenching with rinse water from wheat kernals tomorrow and at the end of the month will start foliar feeding.

Am experimenting this year with some of the giant softnecks (Kettle River and Applegate) from WA and hope they will survive/produce so I can maintain them many years. These are so easy for my arthritic fingers to prepare without blanching.

This year, I soaked most of the 'seed cloves' in a dilute solution of fish emulsion, peeled the cloves and then rinsed them in vodka before planting. It was a surprise to find that many cloves that had appeared single, were actually doubles. In a few weeks, I will check for % of growth as I did not get them planted until Dec 1.

What varieties do you grow?

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hendi_alex
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Here is an excerpt from a post last season.
"This year I planted Morado Gigante, Tuscan, Bogatyr, Asian Tempest, Metechi, Xian*, Purple Glazer, Susanville*, Early Red*, Polish White, Silver Rose*, Silver White and CA early. Next year I'm adding Corsican Red and Simonetti to the crop."

My beds are about 8 inches deep, for my first crop the beds were only about 5 inches deep. The garlic did better in those shallow beds over concrete than they did in the enriched area directly in the ground.

I don't give my garlic much attention and don't mulch. Before planting cloves, the soil is enriched with organic fertilizer mix consisting of cotton seed meal, bone meal, blood meal, kelp meal, and lime. Nothing else is added until harvest around mid June when about half of the top growth has turned brown.

This is my first bulb from last year.
[img]https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3340/3555310834_d66826e9ed_o.jpg[/img]

This is the full harvest of one of my favorites, 'Xian' which has very large cloves.
[img]https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3609/3569426079_75c4467ea4_o.jpg[/img]

This is about 1/5 of the harvest after drying and cleaning.
[img]https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3622/3611639636_04104f8907_o.jpg[/img]
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
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Ozark Lady
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Some very nice garlic, alot larger than the ones that I grew.

I am not talking elephant garlic, but the other larger garlics, do they have the same flavor as the littler ones?

I have never seen garlic with red on it, does it taste any different?

I look at all the garlic names and have no clue what is a what.
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hendi_alex
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Personally I think that variation in garlic flavors is a lot like olive oil. If you taste a small amount of various olive oils the flavor distinction is obvious, sometimes floral, sometimes tart, somtimes with a bite. But when the olive oil is put to most any use, those flavor distinctions disappear to my palate. That is why I only use expensive oil for very basic things like drizzling on a salad or for dipping bread.

I'm sure that the garlic varieties also have very distinct differences, especially in degree of heat when eaten raw or when eating by itself roasted or as a spread. But when cooked in varous soups, sauces, and entres I never noticed any distinction between one variety and the other. So my preference for the home garden, if limited to just a couple of varieties, would be softnecks I(because they store longer) that form relatively large cloves which are easy to use in meal preparation.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
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Ozark Lady
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I hear ya on meal preparation.

I get my cutting board out, smash the garlic clove with the side of the knife until it splits the skin. But, still my fingers quickly get sticky and the skins stick to me, and it becomes an issue to peel out the garlic.

Larger cloves from larger heads are definitely faster to process! Whether eating them or cooking with them.

I thought it was just me, because folks talk about garlic tasting different and I thought, my taste buds must be failing, because garlic tastes like garlic to me. But, I can't tell wines, or olive oils apart either.

To me all wine is bitter and alchol tasting, not good. I even took a wine class and they all taste the same. Blindfolded they are all bitter, and alcohol. I failed the tasting, and aroma part of that class, I just couldn't tell one wine from another, unless I looked at it. Only visually could I pick one wine from another, I could then tell, red, white, or burgundy, ha ha.

We all have different tastebuds, and our palates are trained or not trained.
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hendi_alex
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I'm pretty good at wine tasting. Can always tell a Reistling from a Cab, even when not looking!

Seriously, I love wine and its infinite variety, with both subtle and not so subtle differences from one type or label to next. Which reminds me, it is time for a $400 wine run to stock up for the next couple of months. I really hate to hear that the Asians are developing a taste for wine. That could serious affect prices and availability in the coming years.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
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tedln
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Alex,

"If you taste a small amount of various olive oils the flavor distinction is obvious, sometimes floral, sometimes tart, somtimes with a bite. But when the olive oil is put to most any use, those flavor distinctions disappear to my palate. That is why I only use expensive oil for very basic things like drizzling on a salad or for dipping bread. "

I often ate at a small restaurant near New Orleans called "Smilies". They kept a tall wine bottle of olive oil on each table with the pouring spout on top. The oil was infused with garlic and herbs. It was great with just about anything. As you mentioned, I loved it for dipping pieces of crusty bread. In Italian restaurants, I am often served small saucers of extra virgin olive oil with toasted garlic in it. I think I would be happy just dipping bread and ordering nothing else.

Ted
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I have heard that some bubs you can cut in pieces and as long as you still have a part of the base attached, it will grow. I'm wondering if You were to take a clove a garlic and cut it in half or so, but still maintain the base, if it wouldn't grow. I may be getting my classifications mixed up on this one, however.
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tedln
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hendi_alex wrote:I'm pretty good at wine tasting. Can always tell a Reistling from a Cab, even when not looking!

Seriously, I love wine and its infinite variety, with both subtle and not so subtle differences from one type or label to next. Which reminds me, it is time for a $400 wine run to stock up for the next couple of months. I really hate to hear that the Asians are developing a taste for wine. That could serious affect prices and availability in the coming years.
I'm not a sophisticated wine drinker, but you can eliminate the Reistlings, and the Cabernets, and all other white wines; for me. I've attended wine tastings in Napa Valley (Robert Mondavi and others) and was not impressed. I've pretty much settled on cheap Merlot and even cheaper Chianti. $400.00 would probably cover my wine for a year.

Ted
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Ozark Lady
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I could be wrong Garden 5, but I think you would need the base of the garlic clove for the roots to grow.

It would be an interesting experiment. Try one whole clove in a pot, and beside it the two halves. Then you can let us know if it worked.

I would guess, if it does work, it will take longer, due to moisture lost when you cut the clove.
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tedln
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Ozark Lady wrote:I could be wrong Garden 5, but I think you would need the base of the garlic clove for the roots to grow.

It would be an interesting experiment. Try one whole clove in a pot, and beside it the two halves. Then you can let us know if it worked.

I would guess, if it does work, it will take longer, due to moisture lost when you cut the clove.
I don't know if it works the same with onions and garlic, but in Spain; they plant full sized onions from which the root base, the top, and the skin have been removed. The onions then grow into large onion bunches which are harvested and roasted wrapped in newspaper. It seems plants like onions and garlic may be able to reproduce or multiply by cellular division.

Ted
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tn_veggie_gardner
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Wow, beautiful garlic harvest! =)

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Ozark Lady
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I have used the top half of an onion, and put the base up, intending to use it later, and soon find a base with green onions growing from it, in the fridge.
I have also taken celery, and cut most of the stalks off, and have the base grow more. A lot of times, I take the tough stalks, and the base and use them to flavor soups, so I save them in the fridge, or freezer.
If I think that I will use them soon, then I don't freeze them, and that is when I often get sprouts. Now I do it on purpose to get green chives in winter! Also the little celery tastes great on a salad.

I have wondered, what if I planted this root base, it is growing, what would I get? Another experiment.
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