garden5
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What's your favorite/best tasting squash?

It can be summer, winter, or one of each (do specify, though).

I want to try a new (to me) variety, but I can't go by just the packet description. After all, "tastes good" and "good tasting" aren't really that descriptive. Also, I read in the description of one that it was as sweet as a sweet potato, but I later read a review about it and the person said that it was actually kind of bland.

So, what say you? What's the best tasting squash you've grown 8). Also, on a bit of a side note, has anyone had a good experience growing Argonaut squash (it's like a giant butternut)?

Thanks, all. :D
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rainbowgardener
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My favorite is the Delicata squash. It's an old heirloom variety that's become popular again. It's sort of between a winter and summer squash. Visually beautiful, yellow with dark stripes. Very tasty, but as the name suggests delicate flavor, creamy, a bit like corn. Thinner skinned than most winter squash, so the skin is edible too. I never planted any, but we got some from the CSA two years ago and last year it came up as a volunteer. This year I will plant some, if I can find the seeds.

Here's a picture (just ignore the pumpkin in the middle, it's just the sign board!)

https://drakreate.net/wordpress1/wp-content/uploads/2007/02/delicata-squash.jpg

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Ozark Lady
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Oh wow! Tough question.
How many of us have tried very many varieties?
I can say... I don't like vegetable spaghetti squash... nor the yellow crookneck squashes.

I do like most all the others. Of the few that I have tried, I preferred zuchini and butternut. I really want to try alot of the others... Need recipes, and ways to prepare them once I grow them though...

I am sort of squash ignorant...maybe how to prepare the squash needs to be another thread... but input would also effect the squash that you enjoy.
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tedln
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Really good question!

I really prefer the taste of all the winter squash like butternut, acorn, and pumpkin. They do have flavors that really stand out. I don't grow them because for me, they are space hogs. I prefer to grow summer squash like zucchini and yellow squash which produce well in smaller, more contained areas. Of the summer squash mentioned, I only grow yellow squash because it has a good flavor which can be presented in casseroles, steamed, fried, or grilled. I only like zucchini grilled. I have also grown luffa which has a good taste when picked less than 16" long. It may be more of a gourd than a squash, but it cooks like a squash. The vines are huge and when fully grown (up to 36") and dried, they make good shower scrubs.

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jal_ut
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For winter squash, it is hard to beat butternut.

Summer squash, I like yellow crookneck.
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garden5
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Thanks for the opinions, everyone!

RB, I think I'm going to go for some of that delicata. It sounds great and I've even found some bush-form seeds.

It's kind of hard to find the Striata d' Italia, bu I'll see what I can do. I kind of want to make my squash purchase from the same site, so the S&H doesn't "Squash" my budget.

Jal, you've got it right about the butternuts; they're great. If you like butternuts, take a look [url=https://www.reimerseeds.com/argonaut-squash.aspx]at this![/url] I want to give one of these a try this year, but will probably have to start it indoors in a large pot about 1-2 months ahead of time.
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Tater
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We found out last year that you can take a butternut poke fork holes in it and it ill cook in 12 minutes in the microwave...not as good as slow in the oven but if your in a hurry...

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I also like Hubard squash. It is a winter squash. It gets quite large, so you cut one up then go visit all the neighbors. :) I guess you could cook up the whole thing then freeeze some.

For a small 2 serving winter squash, Table Queen Acorn is good.
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Cagolddigger
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Summer: Love Spaghetti Squash

Fall/Winter: Butternut.

In fact i just had one from my fall garden for dinner tonight. Roasted with olive oil, a splash of balsamic, lemon zest, and basil.

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applestar
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tedln wrote:I have also grown luffa which has a good taste when picked less than 16" long. It may be more of a gourd than a squash, but it cooks like a squash. The vines are huge and when fully grown (up to 36") and dried, they make good shower scrubs.
I bought a packet of luffa to grow this year. I saw that they're supposed to be edible young. I guess I'll try eating them too, though I bought it primarily to make the scrubs. I've seen various description for processing the mature gourd... how do YOU do it?

Last year, I tried growing Bush type Delicata with Jade bush beans, and the beans simply overwhelmed the squash, while Kakai unhulled seed pumpkin, that were sowed at the same time, made good it's escape by growing right out of the bed. :roll: :lol: I'll have to give the Delicata a less hostile environment to grow this year. :wink:

I grew Birdhouse gourds last year. This year, I'm going to try growing the Bushel gourd as well as the Luffa, maybe more Birdhouse, too, since I saved so many seeds.

Sorry no squash recommendations from me. Last year's first squash attempt was pretty miserable with only a few harvested from zucchini, yellow crook neck, and none from pattypan. Could not form a taste opinion except that they tasted better than store bought -- but you all knew THAT, right? :roll: Hoping for more success this year.

garden5
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jal_ut wrote:I also like Hubard squash. It is a winter squash. It gets quite large, so you cut one up then go visit all the neighbors. :) I guess you could cook up the whole thing then freeeze some.

For a small 2 serving winter squash, Table Queen Acorn is good.
I'm thinking about trying some acorn this year, but I'm not sure. They are kind of small, how's the yield?

Also, I've heard of Hubbard (and seen some giant ones) but have never tasted it; how does it compare to butternut?

Lufa, huh; I always thought they came from the ocean! Learn something new every day here :lol:. I think that the lufa will have to wait until next year, un less I come across some seeds at the store (I'm not paying the s&h for one packet of seed:))

I'm kicking around spaghetti squash. It's interesting to hear it called a summer squash; I've always heard that it's a winter variety. Perhaps there is an early version, or maybe it is one of those varieties that has an "in between" maturing time.

I'm sorry to hear about your patty pan, Apple. What do you think caused it? I'm planning on growing some this year, does anyone know how they taste?

It's interesting that no one has mentioned pumpkins. The large ones do not taste all that great, but the small ones for pies I'll bet do. Although they are a squash, most people, including myself, tend to put them into their own category.

Tanks for the tips, everyone, and good luck with your squash.
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Sasha
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I really like Lebanese zucchini, though I'm not sure why. I think the flesh is firmer and less watery. And they're cute.

Straight neck and crook neck squash can be a lot of fun:

https://www.diseaseproof.com/uploads/image/VEGGOOSE.JPG

pondlady
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For wonter squash Ihave to go with Butternut! But for summer squash NOTHING beats the flavor of the Zephyr Hybrid from Gurneys seed. Beats crooks and Zuks hands down.
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Sasha wrote:Straight neck and crook neck squash can be a lot of fun:

https://www.diseaseproof.com/uploads/image/VEGGOOSE.JPG
LOVE IT!! I'll have to work extra hard on the Yellow crook neck this year. You've just earned it an up-grade in planting location. :wink: :lol:

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"Lufa, huh; I always thought they came from the ocean! Learn something new every day here . I think that the lufa will have to wait until next year, un less I come across some seeds at the store (I'm not paying the s&h for one packet of seed:))

Yep, I used to grow them, but they make really long vines and need lots of nitrogen and water. I grew them in the back yard and let them grow up some large trees. People driving in the street in front of the house would stop and ask what kind of trees I had in the back yard with giant nuts in them. I had a lot of fun with them. I got the seed from some Chinese friends from Taiwan. She also taught me how to cook them. The taste is really nice and kinda sweet. If you over cook them, they seem to simply melt and disappear.

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applestar
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applestar wrote:
Sasha wrote:Straight neck and crook neck squash can be a lot of fun:

https://www.diseaseproof.com/uploads/image/VEGGOOSE.JPG
LOVE IT!! I'll have to work extra hard on the Yellow crook neck this year. You've just earned it an up-grade in planting location. :wink: :lol:
Here are MY duckies! :()
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image7463.jpg[/img]

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My favorite is yellow crookneck.I like the delicata also. I haven't tried very many kinds though.
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I started with nothing and still have most of it!!!

tedln
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Nice ducks you have there applestar. When I was a little kid, my favorite cartoon in the Sunday comics was "Little Abner". They had some critters in the cartoons that looked just like your ducks called Shmoo's. They didn't have tails either. The neat thing about them was they were also good to eat, but no one ever ate one in the cartoons. Below is a description of a Shmoo from Wikipedia.

A shmoo is shaped like a plump bowling pin with legs. It has smooth skin, eyebrows and sparse whiskers - but no arms, nose or ears. Its feet are short and round but dexterous, as the shmoo's comic book adventures make clear. It has a rich gamut of facial expressions, and often expresses love by exuding hearts over its head.

Cartoonist Al Capp ascribed to the shmoo the following curious characteristics. His satirical intent should be evident:

* They reproduce asexually and are very prolific. They require no sustenance other than air.
* Naturally gentle, they require minimal care, and are ideal playmates for young children.
* Shmoos are delicious to eat, and are eager to be eaten. If a human looks at one hungrily, it will happily immolate itself, either by jumping into a frying pan, after which they taste like chicken, or into a broiling pan, after which they taste like steak. When roasted they taste like pork, and when baked they taste like catfish. (Raw, they taste like oysters on the half-shell.)
* They also produce eggs (neatly packaged), milk (bottled grade-A), and butter — no churning required. Their pelts make perfect bootleather or house timber, depending on how thick you slice it.
* They have no bones, so there's absolutely no waste. Their eyes make the best suspender buttons, and their whiskers make perfect toothpicks. In short, they are simply the perfect ideal of a subsistence agricultural herd animal.
* The frolicking of shmoon is so entertaining (such as their staged "shmoosical comedies") that people no longer feel the need to watch television or go to the movies.
* Some of the more tasty varieties of shmoo are more difficult to catch. Usually shmoo hunters, now a sport in some parts of the country, utilize a paper bag, flashlight and stick to capture their shmoos. At night the light stuns them, then they can be whacked in the head with the stick and put in the bag for frying up later on.

Thank you for reminding me of the shmoo. (they were really good when pan fried with yellow squash)
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jal_ut
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Any of the winter squash makes a better pumpkin pie than pumpkin.
Pumpkins are for decoration!
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TFA303
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Heirloom Boston Marrow winter squash do great in my garden. They sprout reliably, grow like crazy, they can handle the heat, and don't seem to mind the lousy clay soil.
[img]https://www.hauntedbay.com/images/thelab/CRW_8911_small.jpg[/img]

Downsides seem to be a susceptibility to powdery mildew and early blight and the fact that they need lots of room (though my experiment in growing
one on the fence is working well)

They're yummy and taste like a pumpkin.

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Ozark Lady said she needed a recipe ,try this simple one. Crush a clove of garlic into some olive oil, cut summer squash in half the long way (we prefer yellow or green zukes) brush with olive oil and sprinkle with seasoned salt.Place on grill, medium heat, for about 5 minutes on each side. That's about as easy as it comes and I haven't found anybody yet who doesn't like it.

garden5
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Ha, now a butternut pumpkin pie, that sounds good.
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garden5 wrote:Ha, now a butternut pumpkin pie, that sounds good.
I have made them and they are really good! Butternut is what we grow, thats our favorite.

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Cagolddigger wrote:Summer: Love Spaghetti Squash

Fall/Winter: Butternut.

In fact i just had one from my fall garden for dinner tonight. Roasted with olive oil, a splash of balsamic, lemon zest, and basil.
Not to steal the thread, but how did you store them to keep so long?

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Some of the harvest 2008

[img]https://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/eric_wa/WinterSquash002.jpg[/img]

I've grown many different types.

Winter squash

Bush Delicata
Honey Boat Delicata
Carnival
Chirimen
Discus Bush buttercup
Fairy
Gold Nugget
Mesa Queen
Table King
Hubbard
Spaghetti

Sweet Dumpling and Carnival are my two favorite. Both are delicata type squashes.

If you grow pumpkins for pies, you should try Sugar Pie and Fairytale.

I only like summer squash in breads and muffins. Has anyone tried juicing summer squash, sense they are mostly water.

Eric

rkunsaw
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jal_ut wrote:Any of the winter squash makes a better pumpkin pie than pumpkin.
Pumpkins are for decoration!
:lol: I use sweet potatoes for my "pumpkin" pies. :roll:
I started with nothing and still have most of it!!!

garden5
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DoubleDogFarm wrote:Some of the harvest 2008

[img]https://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/eric_wa/WinterSquash002.jpg[/img]

I've grown many different types.

Winter squash

Bush Delicata
Honey Boat Delicata
Carnival
Chirimen
Discus Bush buttercup
Fairy
Gold Nugget
Mesa Queen
Table King
Hubbard
Spaghetti

Sweet Dumpling and Carnival are my two favorite. Both are delicata type squashes.

If you grow pumpkins for pies, you should try Sugar Pie and Fairytale.

I only like summer squash in breads and muffins. Has anyone tried juicing summer squash, sense they are mostly water.

Eric

Wow, good harvest. I'm growing delicata and sugar pie this year, so I'm glad to hear your recommendations.

In my case, I'm growing the bush delicata variety.
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applestar
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Luffa and Birdhouse Gourd are growing... 8)

Luffa vines have claimed the top of the tomato trellis, though tomatoes are growing fast, not to be outdone 8)
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image7561.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image7622.jpg[/img]

First Birdhouse Gourds... more to come:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image7620.jpg[/img]

Bonus photo of Yamato Japanese cucumbers :wink::
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image7619.jpg[/img]

scot29
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My favorite squash has always been buttercup. I grow the AAS winner Sweet Mama. Oh man, so good.

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