toxicburn1
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AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
:cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:
honestly... is it time for me to replant the seeds from the scratch? everything is dieing like there is no tomorrow

here are pix of my cemetery :(

[img]https://lh6.ggpht.com/_8deVzOVFZMk/S5XSJ0YR1dI/AAAAAAAAE4o/eSYq7b8WdOw/s800/IMG_1729.JPG[/img]

[img]https://lh3.ggpht.com/_8deVzOVFZMk/S5XSK4DOCVI/AAAAAAAAE40/8nO4lZdhR_s/s800/IMG_1732.JPG[/img]

and here are the cucumbers. almost all about to die :(
Problem - stem shrank. is that because i have touched it (not squished... well there was a bit of pressure)
[img]https://lh4.ggpht.com/_8deVzOVFZMk/S5XSKjQsvuI/AAAAAAAAE4w/y6c5eCKUwWw/s800/IMG_1731.JPG[/img]
[img]https://lh5.ggpht.com/_8deVzOVFZMk/S5XSKEHzGJI/AAAAAAAAE4s/JrsdGLGJboc/s800/IMG_1730.JPG[/img]

i looked at the soil, it is pretty wet - no watering for few days at least

i think i have enough time to start all over again. what do you think?
or just let it go?
lets see how will it turn out:)

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rainbowgardener
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Not because you touched them. The bottom picture definitely looks like damping off. The combination of too much water, peat pots, and no air circulation has lead to damping off fungus. The ones that are pinched in at the stems or flopped over (like the one in picture 2, bottom left) are goners.

A lot of the rest don't look happy or thriving, but might be saved, if it is worth it to you to go to the trouble. Repot them (again! sorry :( ) out of the peat pots (plastic nursery pots are perfect, but it can be dixie cups, yoghurt cups, etc as long as you put drainage holes in the bottom), take down one side of your reflector set up so air can circulate (or put a fan in the tunnel if you want to keep it), and don't over water. Or you can start over.

I'm sorry, it makes me mad that they still sell those peat pots and advertise them like its a great thing. How can they get away with it after all the seedlings that have died in them! :twisted:

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applestar
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I think you'll be better off re-planting the cucumbers. They look like they really needed more light. Generally, you want to see color in the hypocotyl (stem between soil and seed leaves), and sometimes fuzz. It would be best if the seed leaves open by 1/4"~1/2" for tiny seeds, 1/2"~1"H for small seeds and by 1"~2"H for larger seeds.

Put different kind of seeds in separate sturdy drip trays so as they grow, you can raise them on supports individually (e.g. peppers and cucs should be in separate trays). I've been mostly using plastic take out trays (aluminum ones are generally too flimsy so I use them as reflectors along the edges, though you've got that taken care of)

You definitely need a fan like rainbowgardener said if you don't have one. For small fans, ingenious folks have used salvaged PC fans, there are also personal clamp-on fans, pet crate fans, and car window fans.
Last edited by applestar on Tue Mar 09, 2010 11:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

garden5
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As Apps and RG said, that is the dreaded damping off.

I'm not certain about the cukes, but if you catch a tomato plant in time you can save it, at least I did.

When you just notice the "pinch," re-pot it deeper. I did this about 3 days ago and, so far, it looks like it will be just fine. I can't guarantee this will work for you, as I have only done it once, but it might be worth a try.

In addition to the fan that was previously suggested, you should water them with chamomile-treated water. You do this by filling a container with warm (from the tap, not the stove) water and then soaking a chamomile tea bag in it for a period of time. I do it for a few minuets and squish it around with my fingers to get a lot of the chamomile into the water, but others let it sit overnight.

Once the water has a nice tint and sweet smell, use it to water your plants. The chamomile has an anti-fungal effect, which helps combat the damping off.

Good luck.
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wjcmpbll
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Ok, here goes...

My tomatoes, broccoli, and cucumbers are about 4" with their first true leaves and they look good. I've thinned most of them, but not all. I have today off from work and I'm gonna try to pot up into 4" containers. Never done this before. I just think it's time to get them out of the peat pellet thing. I've read so much about how to do this that my head is starting to spin. Here's my plan.

1. Go to Home Depot and get good quality soil mix. Hopefully I'll know it when I see it and I can use the same soil for each of the 3 types of plants.
2. Check prices of 4" plastic pots. If affordable, buy what I need. Otherwise hit the grocery store and buy clear plastic Dixie cups in appropriate size.
3. Prep the pots. Thin remaining plants. Carefully cut away the net surrounding the plant (from the peat pellet) and plant tomatoes down to their first leaves. Same with cucumbers but not all the way to the first leaves, being extremely careful. Broccoli not as deep.
4. Water thoroughly, label, put back under lights.

If anyone sees any errors with this plan or has any suggestions, please let me know. It'll be about 2 hours before I'm ready to start. Wish me luck!

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Ozark Lady
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Good luck!

If any of them are leggy you will need alot of luck.

I bent or broke alot of my leggy cabbage, broccoli, etc. I simply went ahead and planted them deep enough to cover the bend/break with soil.. none have died as a result.

My suggestion? For what it is worth, the really leggy ones, use your fingers, not a spoon, and if you remove most of the soil, and gently lift by the seedleaves, you will break less, then I carefully held them up by that leaf, and used a spoon to spoon the dirt in around them.

I found if I tried to get them with a bit of soil... the weight broke the thin stems.
Talk to your plants.... If your plants talk to you... Run!

toxicburn1
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thank you very much rainbowgardener, applestar and garden5 ...and Ozark Lady (had to edit it in :) )

you have just proved that i should have gotten on this forum earlier :(

Oh well... i have plenty seeds left, lots of red plastic cups, 2 bags of pot mix, new T8 tubes (that apparently don't fit into the T12 holder GRRRRrr )

and looks like i'll be staying up longer tonight planting.

Once again, thank you for all you advises. few questions though :oops:

1. what is the temperature for optimal seed bootstrapping (85F ?)
2. once they brake the soil, at what hight should i replant and thin them to a bigger pot
3. what is the optimal temperature for little plants growing
4. Lights: 6-7" from the plants; T8; 16 hours. Blue spectrum deficiency? or should i not to worry about it yet ;) ?
4. Air circulation: tear down the incubator...

any other ideas?
lets see how will it turn out:)

wjcmpbll
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So I ended up only transplanting 16 plants into 16oz cups that I had drilled drain holes into. Here's what I did...

It was hella cheaper to buy 16oz cups from Kroger than 4" pots from Home Depot, so I shelled out $5 for 100 cups. This is the cup...

[img]https://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs419.snc3/25218_103386143026221_100000645081027_102619_1530468_n.jpg[/img]

I used a 1" spade bit to bore drain holes into it...

[img]https://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash1/hs459.ash1/25218_103386163026219_100000645081027_102625_7719640_n.jpg[/img]

which made it look like this...

[img]https://hphotos-snc3.fbcdn.net/hs439.snc3/25218_103386146359554_100000645081027_102620_994446_n.jpg[/img] [img]https://photos-g.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs439.snc3/25218_103386149692887_100000645081027_102621_2586869_n.jpg[/img]

I knew that because I was working with young plants, I would have to distract Sir Purrs-alot. So I took the black pants I'd just gotten back from the dry-cleaner's and gave him an invitation he couldn't refuse. It worked like a charm, enabling me to transplant the seedlings unhindered.

[img]https://photos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs419.snc3/25218_103386159692886_100000645081027_102624_5860410_n.jpg[/img]

After transplanting each plant into its own container, I placed it in a pool of shallow water, thinking that watering from the bottom would be smart.

[img]https://hphotos-snc3.fbcdn.net/hs419.snc3/25218_103386156359553_100000645081027_102623_6129312_n.jpg[/img]

But after about 45 minutes the top still wasn't moist, so I decided to just water each transplant from the top. I gave each about 100mL of warm water.

I guess I'm an idiot because it hadn't occurred to me that 84 peat pellets takes significantly less space than 84 individually potted plants. Needless to say they don't all fit underneath a 48" shop light. So I had to stop the transplanting until I figure out what to do. And I think I have. I knew that I would have more plants than I can handle, and I expected to give them away once they were able to be planted outdoors, BUT... I don't really see the point in investing in more lighting just so I can grow the plants more before I give them away, right? So I guess I'll have to give them away now. Which makes me kinda sad.

So that's what happened. :)[/img]

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gixxerific
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When I transplant I soak the containers before I put the plants in. That way the soil is thoroughly soaked and no need to water after the transplant. Maybe just a little splash. This I find helps speed up the process.

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rainbowgardener
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Yup, gixx nailed it! Always moisten the potting soil (or whatever medium you are using) before you transplant into it! Then you can get it to just the right dampness and then you can do the bottom watering after that. But dry potting soil won't suck up the water from the bottom-- like pouring water on a bone-dry sponge, it just rolls off.

garden5
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toxicburn1 wrote:thank you very much rainbowgardener, applestar and garden5 ...and Ozark Lady (had to edit it in :) )

you have just proved that i should have gotten on this forum earlier :(

Oh well... i have plenty seeds left, lots of red plastic cups, 2 bags of pot mix, new T8 tubes (that apparently don't fit into the T12 holder GRRRRrr )

and looks like i'll be staying up longer tonight planting.

Once again, thank you for all you advises. few questions though :oops:

1. what is the temperature for optimal seed bootstrapping (85F ?)
2. once they brake the soil, at what hight should i replant and thin them to a bigger pot
3. what is the optimal temperature for little plants growing
4. Lights: 6-7" from the plants; T8; 16 hours. Blue spectrum deficiency? or should i not to worry about it yet ;) ?
4. Air circulation: tear down the incubator...

any other ideas?
The best soil temperature for pepper germinating is 70 to 75 F. Now, this is for peppers, but I'm sure it will do well for tomatoes aslo.

I can't say for peppers, but for tomatoes, you will acutally get better and earlier fruit set and stronger plants if you grow them in a little cooler temperatures, like the mid-60s (guessing here). I don't know how good this would be to do for peppers since I know that they prefer warmer growing temperatures. Personally, I wouldn't worry too much about the growing temperature; except for extreme cases, it won't really make or break you. Room temperature should do you.

I would wait until the plants have their first true leaves before you pot them up.

As for the lights, I was always under the impression that closer is better. Although 3-4" is great, I've been seeing a lot of people with their lights further than that. This is my first year with the lights, so someone more experienced will have to weigh in on this subject.

Even if you tear down your incubator, you may still need a small fan (even battery operated) for circulation. I like the aluminum foil idea, so, personally, I'd keep it setup and just get a fan.

I hope this helps some.
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toxicburn1
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garden5 wrote:
toxicburn1 wrote:thank you very much
The best soil temperature ...
Thanks G5 for tips!!!

I haven't figured the lifeline of my incubator: might try something on weekend :)

As to the "garden update" :

only 4 cuucs survived :( one is pretty good candidate!! already have 1.5 true leafs (one is about 10mm covered in tiny hair and the second leaf is 3X smaller). I have replanted em all in plastic cups with wholes and the greatest survivor got a suit - 1/2 gallon milk container with cut off top and partial handle that i will stick a support stick into (clever, ha? Pix soon)
I bought new potting mix which seemed fairly moist, so i watered about 20 -40 gramms each.

All peppers seem to be doing great! Bright green color and staying strong.

Tomatoes... dying. Few seem to be getting back though. Best of all is doing the one that wanted to throw away. (when they started sprouting, this got a seed stuck to the leafs and when i removed it - i ripped both leafs a bit. Now they have a kidney shape.) - first true leafs :)

Melons are doing great too. 6 out of 8 are staying strong and some have started developing first leafs. I'm keeping an eye on the other 2 but i have doubts about em.

Also, i saw that my sorrel started a wile back outside! Woot! But that thing will grow anywhere under any conditions (as far as i remember from back home)
Some of the Rosemary popped up to but just a little.

OH... one more unexpected resident in my garden!!! Someone dropped an apricot seed in my garden... somehow i have missed when i was cleaning up and now it is sprouting :)

that is all for now :)
lets see how will it turn out:)

garden5
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Don't worry too much about the cukes or the melons. Although any head start is great, they will do just fine direct sown. In fact, some gardeners don't like to start them ahead of time; their root systems are very delicate and can be damaged during transplanted.

Great to hear about the toms and peppers! :D
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tn_veggie_gardner
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wjcm: Nice. =) Much better thought out than my same type of method. If you drive by my place in February, you're liable to see my trying to poke holes in my cups with a pocket knife. ;-)

RyanDe680
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I would also mention too that after sprouting occurs (not to go back to the debate of germination vs. sprouting), put that light on them and put it close.

I have mine maybe 2" from the plants themselves (mostly peppers and broccoli now) if not closer. Some of the onions are fast growers and are touching.

I learned that in the past. Makes a huge difference.

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