bridgemontbelle
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Location: Whaley Bridge, High Peak, UK

Fruitless Chilli Plants

Hi, Everyone. I'm growing some drawf chilli plants that are a mass of flowers and still producing more. They look very nice, but I was after chillies really. Can anyone tell me why my plants aren't fruiting - what am I doing wrong? They are planted in pots on the kitchen window sill. The flower stalks turn yellow and the whole thing drops off the plant. I'm new to growing things so any help would be gratefully received. :? :oops:

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pharmerphil
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Location: Minnesota

Re: Fruitless Chilli Plants

bridgemontbelle wrote:Hi, Everyone. I'm growing some drawf chilli plants that are a mass of flowers and still producing more. They look very nice, but I was after chillies really. Can anyone tell me why my plants aren't fruiting - what am I doing wrong? They are planted in pots on the kitchen window sill. The flower stalks turn yellow and the whole thing drops off the plant. I'm new to growing things so any help would be gratefully received. :? :oops:
could be a multitude of things, but it could be over watering, not enough sun, temperature or insufficient pollination..
A little more info please :D

bridgemontbelle
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It could be any of these, though I don't think I've been over-watering them.
The windowsill gets the late afternoon sun direct, perhaps it's not enough?
Temps fairly stable in the kitchen. Don't know about polination...how do indoor plants get polinated? Should I just chuck'em out? Any pointers for next year?

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rainbowgardener
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blossom drop

Blossom drop, where the plant drops the blossoms without setting fruit, can be a reaction to a number of kinds of stress. Type blossom drop into the search box at upper left of most pages to find a lot more information about it.

Peppers are full sun plants, difficult to grow indoors without added light. If your window doesn't get at least 6 hrs of light, it's probably not enough. But if this is the case, your plant would likely be getting tall and leggy ( a little spindly as it stretches to find more light).

If it's a pollination issue, it might help to just gently shake the plant every few days to help with this. It shouldn't need more than that.

dan1003
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Location: Richmond, Va

I'm new here too, but I think the key to this problem is the fact that they are inside. Try hand pollinating (a quick google search will explain it).

cynthia_h
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We've had lots of discussions here at The Helpful Gardener about hand-pollinating plants.

Just use the Search in the upper left-hand corner of almost every page, and you'll receive hits on each thread where it's been discussed.

Good luck with the peppers!

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

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pharmerphil
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I would say that it's the amount of sun that they are getting, they need at least 6 hours of direct light.

Pollination, probably the least likely, as peppers have "perfect" flowers, meaning the flowers have Both male and female components...this can be effected though by changes in temps, which will also cause the blossoms to drop

ChefRob
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Location: Zone 6

The top three reasons you're not producing chiles...

1) You're not supplying them with enough magnesium or heat. Chiles need more magnesium than the next plant (use Epsom salts or a good cal/mag supplement). Provide a consistent 75 to 90 degrees. 82-85 is perfect. Humidity over 50% is also good for chiles.

2) Even though chiles self-pollinate, you may need to aid pollination (since you are indoors) with a moist q-tip or small paintbrush. Brush the stamens gently into the centers of other flowers. You should also run a small fan for a gentle breeze.

3) Insufficient light. Indoor fruiting plants need more light than do herbs. I supply mine with 16 hours of artificial light a day. Research has shown that plants under grow lights that receive 16 hours of light/day produce optimal results. 14 hours/day is my minimum. So, if you want to get serious then buy a good grow light with 10,000 lumens per sq. ft. and change the bulbs once each year. 30% of intensity is lost if you run them 16 hrs. day for a year. The unit should hold dual 54-watt High Output fluorescent bulbs. One warm white (3000 k) and one cool white (6500 k) for full-spectrum. Yardlover.com sells a nice quality sun system tek-light for $187, but they can be found for much cheaper. It should cost about $2-4 in electricity/month to operate.

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