tedln
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Hey bu88les8,

Sounds like a good plan. I'm in the same boat. I am just waiting for the temps to moderate a little. I think we are pretty close to 100 degrees today. Supposedly we will receive a cool front this weekend which will moderate the temps into the mid 60's at night and the high 80's in the daytime. Guess I will need a warm jacket while planting my fall garden. I already have my fall tomatoes planted. Will probably buy seed for the other stuff tomorrow.

I am curious about the onions you are planting. The granex is the parent onion of all the super sweets including the Vidalia, Noonday, and Maui sweet. The variety I plant is the Texas A&M 1015, but I can't plant them until February because we do have a few hard freezes here in the winter. If the fall planted onions are exposed to two freezes before spring, they will bolt quickly in the spring to produce seed and probably not produce a bulb. Did you obtain your seed / seedlings from Vidalia, or were you just referencing the similarity between what you are planting and the Vidalia? Most onion varieties are grown for seed or seedlings for specific areas or zones. If you received yours from Vidalia, Georgia; they may not do well in Southern California.

Just curious.

Ted
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Jewell
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Tinybu - you'll have to let us know how your different vegies do. It is interesting to see what will grow best in each of the different regions at different times/seasons of the year. :P

My broadbeans are up in their pots and the late season corn is tasseled. Won't be long before the beans go in there. The midsummer planted cauliflower got way too big??? :shock: don't understand why. Hopefully it will wait until spring to head up. Got too many vegies right now to eat. All the last seeded greens are coming up. Brussel sprouts are just beginning to form. I don't like them until after a frost and they sweeten so hopefully they will slow down too. It's all a guessing/trial-and-error hobby for me. :roll:
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Tinybu88les8
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tedln

I honestly don't know much about the onion. I ordered all of my seeds from amazon.com. The company is called Hirts Gardens I believe. Ive been a little confused about them myself. Says they are called Granex and come from Vadalia Georgia? Im gonna give them a shot...they sounded so delicious! Ive been dying to make roasted onions with fresh herbs in a cream sauce! Ive been holding onto the recipe. YUM!

tedln
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That does sound delicious. The sweet onion should be perfect. I grew a lot of them this past spring and everyone who ate them commented on how sweet they are. The herb sauce sounds great. Will you make a bechamel white sauce with butter? Which herbs will you use?

Ted
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gixxerific
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Cool still going.

The Vadalia is an awesome onion. I have never grown them but if just right they can be eaten like an apple, if your are into onions that is.

To some of the new comers is it trial and error for me as well. With the dramatic changes in weather. I have started seed that went bad. Started seed again with cooler temps, much better this time. I already have stuff in the ground. Broccoli, Cauliflower, Arugula, Swiss Chard, Blue Lake Beans, Snow Peas, Sugar Daddy Peas, Snowbird Peas, Brussels Sprouts, and Mustard Greens.

As seedling many of the same as well as Mustard, Onions(some Utah strain?) and carrots. The carrots are just today starting to sprout after about 2 weeks.

So Ted be patient with that lettuce as mentioned in your lettuce thread. Take care of them and they will come.

I will be planting more when the tomatoes have been removed, kinda waiting for them to go so I can renew what space I have.

Got Tea, it will be done thur, can't wait. Check this out https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=17097

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Earl K
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Gixx,Cool to already be 6 pages into this huh,Well my scallions,snap peas,more cukes,more pole beans,more radish all are sprouting.Waiting on some tom seeds to get them goin.Also have heatwave tom plant 2 weeks and almost 2 feet tall with 6-8 blossoms starting to open(can see yellow in 3 of them) :D :D .Keep it up :) :) :)
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Tinybu88les8
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Tedln

This is the link to the recipe. Check it out! YUMMMMM!

https://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Onions-Baked-with-Rosemary-and-Cream/Detail.aspx

racerttx
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I too have a fall garden. I have poinsetta cuke plants, big beef tomato plants, jalapeno plants, a few cherry tomato plants and a couple sweet potato tubers. The cukes and jalapenos are in the process of producing so we will see how that goes. Its too hot for the tomato plants to produce right now as I am in north Texas. I have broccoli, carrots, burpless cukes and sweet corn seeds ready to plant for the fall crop but I'm afraid most of them will die due to the heat we are having. With all of this planned I will have only used up about 50% of my total area so I am looking for more ideas. I have gathered up a Texas type variety of seeds in hopes of trading some eventually. This is my first attempt at gardening.

ChefMatt
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Just starting a garden for the first time, I've ripped uo the area I want it to be in, and turned the soil, and started a compost pile, the garden is going to be fairly small, so I'm hoping it won't take too long to get going. What are my next steps/timeframe if I want to get some vegetables growing by say, mid September? And what should I look to grow that will do ok in the ever changing Connecticut climate, and won't be too tough for a first timer? Thanks for the help!

sweet thunder
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I planted peas, chard and spinach yesterday. I'll do some more carrots and maybe lettuce as space frees up.

I'd like to grow some garlic, but I have no idea where to put it! I don't have much space in the ground (I do lots of containers) but if I get my act together and prep some new beds in time, I may do it.

racerttx
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i had a very late start on my garden but i have been checking it daily and have noticed 1 to 2 inch cukes growing all over my plants. this morning i checked and found a surprise, it must have been avoiding me!

[img]https://offinit.com/cuke.JPG[/img]

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gixxerific
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The surprise ones are the best. Mine were so full of foliage I would have to search trough the plant by moving stems around. Even then you might miss 1 or 6. Than all of the sudden you have all these 8 inch cukes. :D Don't forget about the ones you didn't know were there until your neighbor tells you about them cause they are on the other side of the fence. All good with the neighbor cuz they love my cukes. :)

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applestar
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I noticed today that the determinate Pricipe Borghese tomatoes are winding down. I'm ready to throw the towel at Lynn's Mahogany Garnets -- not only do these tomatoes not taste that great, they easily crack or bruise then attract fruit flies, slugs, and other unsavory characters :evil: I may give up on the LMG's and clear them away when I pull the plug on PB's -- Just in time to plant some spinach and maybe fast growing Asian turnips... and I'll have some place to plant the garlic and the shipment of Egyptian and Potato onions I'm expecting this fall. :()
Last edited by applestar on Sun Aug 30, 2009 4:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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gixxerific
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I'm in the same boat as you Apple. All my mators are going down slowly but surely. But it just can't seem to do it. They still have red and greens on them. They went through a state of denial for 2-3 weeks than all of sudden I have more mators than I know what to do with. But I do have a bunch of starters that are doing fairly well. Plus I was going to start some seed I just want to fill up the space that is half wasted with these half productive mators.

Talk about slugs I have seen several 4-6 inch motherblankybalnks around here lately. And something, probably them, is tearing the crap out of my broccoli and cauliflower arugula etc, which I may have to replant. :cry: :evil: :x

Not to mention the yellow finches that think i planted Swiss chard for them. :x

One more thing did I mention my mustard greens went to seed? I pulled them today. It was all a little early I think but I was going by the local ext. advice on when to plant.

tedln
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racerttx wrote:i had a very late start on my garden but i have been checking it daily and have noticed 1 to 2 inch cukes growing all over my plants. this morning i checked and found a surprise, it must have been avoiding me!

[img]https://offinit.com/cuke.JPG[/img]
I looked at the picture of the cuke you posted and the fact that you are also in Texas. I am about 60 miles north of Dallas and my cuke plants are just about worn out from the heat. Half are dead, but the other half are hanging on and producing a few cukes. I will be planting fall cukes next week. Your plant still looks fresh and green and unstressed. What part of Texas are you in, panhandle, east, central?

Ted
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racerttx
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tedln, you sound pretty close to me. I'm in denton right at the 35 split basically. i think a reason mine are doing so well is that they are partially shaded until 11am and then again in the afternoon for a very short period when a small tree shadow passes over. i have built a directional trellis but I'm not happy with the type of material i have used. i have noticed a little heat stress but this cold front that came through helped out a lot but again this is my first vegetable attempt. with that said this is my very first vegetable i will get to harvest so I'm very excited. what condition is your soil in? what kind of cukes have you tried and plan on trying? i too plan on planting another type of cuke for part of my fall crop so we will have to share setup tips and what not. how big is your garden?

tedln
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racerttx,

We are close. We live on the north side of Lake Ray Roberts. Our address is in Valley View.

I've had a great garden this year. You can see photos of it at the following photobucket web page.
https://s291.photobucket.com/albums/ll308/tedln/?start=0

My cukes started producing in May and some plants survived the July/August, 100 degrees plus weather. I'm waiting for the sun to start setting this evening and I will plant some fall plants including cukes. Our temps are only in the high 80's for the next few days, but if you are working in the sun, it feels a lot higher.

We actually live in a very good area for gardening because we can grow early in the year and late in the year.

Enjoy the photos. If you have any questions about my garden, feel free to ask.

Ted
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gixxerific
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I was thinking the same thing, my plants looked like death warmed over and those looked very vibrant. Mine are gone now. Good luck with yours everybody.

tedln
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Dono,

Are you not planting anything for the fall garden?

racerttx,

Our daughter and her family also live in Denton. Their back yard is a large courtyard surrounded by structure and shaded by large trees. She doesn't grow veggies, but she does grow a lot of flowers and plants in pots and in the ground. Because the courtyard is protected, her plants like geraniums and other tender plants live through the winter and nothing dies from the intense heat and sun. Her courtyard probably stays 15 degrees below what my garden sees out in the sun without shade. The cool shade like you have and my daughter has make a huge difference.

Ted
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Diane
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Great pictures Ted. I love the flowers. I was surprised by the winter scene. I know it snows on rare occasions in Texas but that looks more like ...here. :)
My neighbor has a Slippery Elm tree that has grown so much over the years that my yard which was 90% sun is now only 50%.
Gardens are a little bit of heaven on earth.

https://s600.photobucket.com/albums/tt87 ... G00047.jpg

racerttx
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impressive tedln,

looks like a very nice setup, I'm so jealous at how much room you have. i would like to make my trellis system similar to how you have yours next time. we fish Ray Bob all the time since its so close. are bugs a problem for you out there? doing any heirloom tomatoes? what do you add to the soil to get it the way you like it? what about ferts (if any) and pest control?

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gixxerific
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tedln wrote:Dono,

Are you not planting anything for the fall garden?
I have a bunch of stuff planted and am planning more. Though Some of my stuff is getting tore up by birds and slugs. Those may have to be replanted.

tedln
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racerttx wrote:impressive tedln,

looks like a very nice setup, I'm so jealous at how much room you have. i would like to make my trellis system similar to how you have yours next time. we fish Ray Bob all the time since its so close. are bugs a problem for you out there? doing any heirloom tomatoes? what do you add to the soil to get it the way you like it? what about ferts (if any) and pest control?
I think my bugs are probably similar to most gardeners. I have plenty of predatory bugs to control them though. Lots of lady bugs and assassin bugs do the job for me.

I hate to tell this, but since I don't want to dig holes in other places for soil, I buy those cheap bags of dirt at Home depot and then amend it with composted sawdust/horse manure. Since the area around here is "horse" country, there is a good supply of compost available. Most people hate the Home Depot soil, but I've used it with success for many years in raised beds and containers. With the compost, I rarely need additional fertilizer. If I do, I have used commercial 10-10-10 in the past. Next spring and possibly this winter, I will start using aereated compost tea instead of commercial fertilizer.

I've just finished building a 30' X 4' raised bed for spring onions. I have seeded the bed for fall veggies, but will plant 400 onions in it in February. I will leave room for my regular tomato plantings plus an equal number of heirloom tomatoes. We are fortunate to have D&L farm and ranch supply in our area. I went there last week and talked with their nursery manager who gave me a list of the heirloom seedlings they will have available. They also have all the organic products available if you wish to grow organically or make organic teas. They also have a good bulk seed selection. They plan on reworking their seed area this winter and adding varieties people have been asking for. I went to the D&L in Aubrey, you have a D&L close to you on 377.

Ted
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tedln
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Diane wrote:Great pictures Ted. I love the flowers. I was surprised by the winter scene. I know it snows on rare occasions in Texas but that looks more like ...here. :)
My neighbor has a Slippery Elm tree that has grown so much over the years that my yard which was 90% sun is now only 50%.
Your pretty close to correct Diane. We don't get much snow here, but we get some. The photo was taken early in the morning on our property. You can see the blue sky in the background. By late afternoon the snow was all melted. That's the difference between Texas snow and Mass. snow. We only get to admire it rarely and quickly. When you get it, it stays around for awhile. I took a few photos which I use as my desktop background in July and August. It just reminds me that the numbing heat doesn't last all year and better weather will return.

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

racerttx
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here are a couple pictures just to illustrate the area i am working with. i will have to show you the up to date pictures once i am finished being embarrassed bout my trellis :P

[img]https://offinit.com/a.JPG[/img]
[img]https://offinit.com/b.JPG[/img]

just your average backyard vegetable garden!

tedln
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racerttx,

That will be a nice garden. Your soil looks really good. My soil by the lake has way to much hard clay and rock. Thats another reason I used the Home Depot soil. As bad as it is, it is still better than my natural soil. I had four 4' X 8' raised beds this year. That is only equal to about a 10' X 10' normal garden. Very small actual growing area, but it produces a tremendous amount of veggies. With the additional 30' X 4' bed, I will be able to increase my onions and give me a place to rotate my tomatoes to every year.

I bought a six cubic yard load of compost a few weeks ago and I have already used about half of it to plant my fall crop. I will retain about half of the load to top off my beds in the spring. I will keep wetting the compost pile all winter and it should be well composted by spring.

How could you possibly be embarrassed about a cucumber trellis? I always admire people who innovate and use materials that others may not of thought about. Half the materials in my garden like tomato cages, fencing, and trellis wire were tossed out by someone else, but work great for me.

Ted
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gixxerific
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tedln wrote: How could you possibly be embarrassed about a cucumber trellis? I always admire people who innovate and use materials that others may not of thought about. Half the materials in my garden like tomato cages, fencing, and trellis wire were tossed out by someone else, but work great for me.

Ted
Amen brother, I have some pretty crazy, somewhat stupid, yet productive things all over. Necessity is the mother of invention. In other words if you don't have the money to do it right do it with what you have. :D Like we say at work "We have done so much with so little that we can now do anything with nothing"

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Diane
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Ted, your garden looks so organized and well thought out.
My garden starts out somewhat organized, then volunteers pop up and I let them grow. Tomato plants grow up and out of their space. I have cages, wire fences, wood and metal poles and a few other odds and ends proping everything up. It's single file walking through my yard now.
My brother called it a jungle. :lol:
But, I love it all.
Gardens are a little bit of heaven on earth.

https://s600.photobucket.com/albums/tt87 ... G00047.jpg

tedln
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diane,

My garden is organized. I have to plan it in order to plant so thick. I prefer disorganized, random gardens. I organized this garden to simply maximize production. When everything is growing and tall, my garden also feels like a jungle. Sometimes I'm almost afraid to reach into the thicket to pick a ripe tomato not knowing what else may be in there.

My favorite type of gardening is cottage gardening. I like to see gardens that have a different surprise around every corner. I like gardens that mix landscape plantings with productive vegetable plants. It requires a certain climate and landscape structure to achieve a sustainable cottage garden.

I have a friend who is a landscape architect and is going to work with me to see if we can bulldoze some dirt around, place some strategic rocks and boulders, and create a cottage garden that will aesthetically blend with our house. Our house is a renovated two story red barn.

Ted
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tedln
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Diane,

"My neighbor has a Slippery Elm tree that has grown so much over the years that my yard which was 90% sun is now only 50%."


Many years ago, we bought a home in Lake Charles, La. It had a newly planted pecan tree in the back yard. The tree trunk was about the size of a broom stick. I planted my raised beds about 20 feet from that scrawny tree. Ten years later, the tree was about 35 feet tall with a ten inch trunk. It totally shaded my garden almost all day and I couldn't grow anything. I loved the tree and got bushels of paper shell pecans from it every fall. I just gave up the garden rather than cut the tree back. A couple of years later, we decided to return to Texas and put the house on the market. A guy was driving past the house, saw the for sale sign; and could also see the pecan tree towering over the house in the back yard. He bought the house because of the pecan tree.

Ted
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racerttx
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I have learned my lesson on the trellis. Next time it will be much taller and the the correct material so that i don't have to train them every single day. the only reason i used this stuff is because i already had it from a ferret cage i made.

[img]https://offinit.com/plot1.JPG[/img]
big beef tomato plants on the left, jalapeno in the center and cukes on the right.

[img]https://offinit.com/plot2.JPG[/img]
self explanatory

[img]https://offinit.com/src.JPG[/img]
this picture right here is of the small red cherry tomato plants (heirloom) i started indoors. this was the first day of hardening them off or whatever its called. i plan on planting them in one of my empty rows.

[img]https://offinit.com/trip/clivia_miniata.jpg[/img]
this is a clivia miniata a relative gave me.

[img]https://offinit.com/canna_color.jpg[/img]
this is the color of my cannas out front.

[/img]

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gixxerific
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My neighbor just put up a deck, of course I helped him build it. But it shades my garden a little now. Not much and only later in the day when the sun is going down. Actuary could be beneficial for sun\shade plants. It only really shades a small portion of it. Oh well nothing a can of gas and a match won't fix. :twisted: :P

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Earl K
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Of the six types of tomato seeds planted 4 days ago 5 of them have sprouted.Also 3 of 4 zukes have sprouted.Peas are now 6 in. tall.Heatwave tomato has about 20 blossoms opening so I think my fall plantings are coming :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D
Florida porchgrown veggies
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tedln
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racer,

I love your garden. Maybe you can leave the ferret out at night to keep the rats and mice under control. Just put him or her under the trellis and he will feel right at home :D .

You are a lot more courageous than me. Planting tomato and pepper seed this late in the season. Maybe we will have a real late first frost. I've never tried broccoli in my garden, but it should do well as a fall planting. I will be curious about how well it does.

keep us posted on how it progresses.

So far, I have been reworking my beds with compost and planting as I go. I have planted Goliath tomatoes, asparagus yard long beans, turnips, spinich, swiss chard, collard greens, iceberg lettuce, romaine lettuce, cucumbers, and yellow crookneck squash. I will plant garlic and a few other things tomorrow. I still have my spring cucumbers, better boy tomatoes, juliet cherry tomatoes, bell peppers, jalapeno peppers, and sweet banana peppers producing. My spring cucumbers are really looking pitiful, but they keep producing cucumbers on new growth. I am curious how they will react to about three inches of fresh compost on their roots. It may rejuvinate them or it may finish killing them. I pulled my last squash plant the other day and added it to the compost pile with the others. Most of my fall plantings are a first for me. It will either be a great success or a total failure. A lot will depend on how late our first frost of the winter is.

Ted
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tedln
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Earl,

I suspect winter is the best time of the year for you to grow tomatoes on your porch. Do you get any winter weather cold enough to damage your plants?

Ted
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Earl K
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No real threat of frost or freeze,If so it may just get to freezing for an hour or two.First year so havent dealt with that yet.Also 80% will be in containers so they can come inside and sleep with us and the dog :) or just cover with a sheet :)
Florida porchgrown veggies
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Jewell
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Havested the last of the summer squash and all the tomatoes and the broad beans are in the ground in their beds. (Still have to find some recipes for fixing the broad beans) Some winter squash harvested and some still to harvest. Still have a lot of runner beans and second batch of cabbage to harvest. :) All season cauliflower, kale and beets looking good. :D Slugs ate the last planting of winter lettuce, and spinach that were not started in pots. :x Guess they like the really tender starts. Got the first batch of garlic in for next year. Made my first batch of green tomato chip dip. Yum, yum, yum. Hubby said we need to freeze some for sharing during the winter holidays. :wink:
Feeling the bounty.
Jewell
My Vegie Gardens https://picasaweb.google.com/Jewell2009/ ... arden2009#
Zone 7b or Western Gardener's Zone 4
There are fairies at the bottom of my garden~Anonymous

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Earl K
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Jewell,green tomato chip dip?tell me more-never heard of that :?
Florida porchgrown veggies
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Jewell
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The green tomato chip dip was a trial and taste concotion. You do what you have to do to help use up some of those green tomatoes. :lol: We liked it so much I've started up the second batch. I couldn't give you an exact recipe, but here is the gist of it:

-olive oil to cover bottom of pan
-saute several garlic cloves and 1/2 diced onion
-fill large pot with green and almost ripe tomatos and cook covered until soft
-remove lid and simmer adding cumin, and salt to taste
-simmer until thick
-add large can of stewed tomatoes, can of roasted peppers, two cans of black beans and 1/2 cup of rice.
-cook until rice is cooked and mixture is thick

The green tomatoes give a tangy lime flavoring that is really good with chips. :D
Jewell
My Vegie Gardens https://picasaweb.google.com/Jewell2009/ ... arden2009#
Zone 7b or Western Gardener's Zone 4
There are fairies at the bottom of my garden~Anonymous

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Earl K
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Thanks Jewell,I shall try that but maybe 1/2 the portions-only two of us.Sounds great :D
Florida porchgrown veggies
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