Murdok
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Need some information...

I live in Southeastern Kentucky in the Appalachian mountains. There is a part of my land that I would like to grow on (because most areas are rocky and steep) but the land is very swamp like. Could you all give me some advice on what vegtables or fruits to plant on dark soil in 70 to 80 degree weather with excessive moisture?

Thanks a lot :-)

opabinia51
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Cranberries are the first thing that comes to mind.

The Helpful Gardener
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Actually that's a misconception Opa. They like sandy soil like most of the blueberry family, but the berries trap airbubbles, making floating them a most efficient harvesting method. But they do very nicely in well drained soil...

Service berries are about the best fruit source for human consumption for that situation, although blueberries will do back just a bit from water (shallow rooters). Raspberries take damp and elderberries would do famously, but like the others, you will be hard pressed to keep the birds off of them; plant a couple to keep them happy too...

Sure there are lots of veggies like melons and squash that would put on ponderous size with damper soil...

HG

Murdok
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Actually, after looking again the ground is rather sandy. It is thick with crab grass and some tall plants that flower during the summer. I should also mention that the area is somewhat shady. I would like to grow something here though because I like gardening and I don't have very much flat land. Will melons do well in sandy / moist soil in a shady area? The last time I tried to grow melons in a shady area they didn't grow very well (but it could have been my poor gardening skill).

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Nope they like sun. But the rest of the list is still good...

HG

opabinia51
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Thanks for that heads up Scott, I knew that but, forgot about it when making that post : :x :oops: :cry:

Glad we are here to correct eachother when we make mistakes. :wink:

You know what grows well in swampy areas? Cat tails (sp?) And they are edible with a taste akin to cucumbers.

You just peel back the outer layers, wash and eat.

Murdok
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Cat tails? Those are everywhere around here (lot of ponds on a strip mine near me). Eating them sounds disgusting though. As a kid we would pick them and use them like swords or clubs.

The Helpful Gardener
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Actually they were a main food source for all the Northeastern Indian tribes and a good deal of the wildlife around here too. Tastes a good bit like a sunchoke boiled; it was often boiled dried and ground again like a flour. The protein rich seed heads are an important spring food source as well...

[url]https://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants.Folder/Cattails.html[/url]


There are a lot of perfectly good foods out there in our native pantry that we ignore; I am forever hauling stuff out of the woods for folks to munch when we walk in the woods (my lady is finally starting to get used to it) :roll:

HG

opabinia51
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Yes, cattails are (like I said) somewhat akin to cucumber when eaten raw. I had never thought of cooking them but, why not?

The Helpful Gardener
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You're talking shoots and I'm talking roots, the seed heads are also edible. This whole plant was a primary food source for the Nortgh eastern tribes, in some ways more important than corn as it was collectible and omnipresent; Nature always keeps the larder stocked...

Scott

opabinia51
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What's the larder? But, yeah, it's great.

Few people realize what a salad bar they have in their own back yards. Dandelions are another one that is often over looked. The young flowers are sweet and remind me of candy, the leaves are great in salads and you can steam them as well. (They do get a little bitter with older plants though) and the root, you an eat raw or cook or make a tea out of.

Very versatile plant and it is nutritious as well.

Here is something that I discovered while readinga good book yesterday; Kannickanick (I'm never sure about that spelling :wink: ) berries are supposed to be quite juicy when they are ripe. I've always found them to be to woody, but, I guess I've never tried eating them when they were ripe. Who knew?

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Sure (the leaves also figured in my regions tribal smoking mixtures too. Another versatile plant... :lol: )

Did you know that there are few perfect food sources (singular sorce you could survive on indefinitely), but we have one in blueberries, often in opur own backyard! How cool! 8)

Scott

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