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Gary350
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Location: TN. 50 years of gardening experience.

How do you store your seeds?

I have always heard if you keep seeds in an air tight container like a jar or plastic bag the seeds would die from lack of oxygen. I have no idea if that is true so I don't take chances, I don't keep my seeds in jars. 50 jars with only a tablespoon of seeds inside would take up a lot of space.

I have been keeping my seeds in white paper mailing envelopes. I can write the name on the envelope then seal it up with the seeds inside. This works fine until spring when I need to plant seeds. After I open the envelope and use some of the seeds I have to seal them again with tape or use a new envelope to keep the seeds from spilling out. There has to be a better way.

This year I am planning to save more seeds than ever. I spent about $50 on seeds this year and about $160 on plants. If I save more seeds I won't have to buy plants or seeds next year.

What do you keep your seeds in, I am looking for ideas?

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BrianSkilton
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Location: South Dakota

I just use a regular old plastic bag. This makes it easy to store and you can reuse the bag. I sometimes place the seeds in a paper towel / kitchen paper and place that in the plastic bag. Anyway, not sure how reliable it is but that is what I do. I store my whole seed box in a cool dry place.
Why buy produce when you can grow it?
-Nick

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jal_ut
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Location: Northern Utah Zone 5

I have always heard if you keep seeds in an air tight container like a jar or plastic bag the seeds would die from lack of oxygen.
I dispute this idea. I had some wheat that had been sealed in a #10 can for 11 years. It had been canned with an oxygen removal packet in the can. I tried to germinate this wheat. It germinated about 50% after being in that can for 11 years without oxygen.

My left over garden seed is in paper envelops or bags which I keep in a cardboard box in the garage year round. When I save small seeds, I put them in a regular small envelope like you would mail a letter in. Larger seeds I save in a small brown paper bag. I prefer paper to plastic bags for seeds.

We have a dry climate here in Northern Utah. I don't know if this would work if you have high humidity.

You can put seeds in a jar and refrigerate them. Seeds keep better at constant cool temperatures.
Last edited by jal_ut on Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

zone9garden.com
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If they are seeds that I bought I keep them in the package I bought them in. If they are seeds from plants in my garden I put them in a piece of folder paper. Both are stored in a cool area in my home in a plastic drawer that looks like this:

[img]https://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/410xeplJKXL._SL500_AA280_.jpg[/img]

petalfuzz
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I make small envelopes out of wax paper and store them in the refrigerator. It's safer than the garage, since we have problems with humidity here.

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hendi_alex
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I keep all saved seeds in the freezer. Most are still viable after four years or longer.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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rainbowgardener
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saving seed

I just keep mine in paper envelopes, which I sometimes keep in fridge and sometimes in freezer; either way seems to work. You are right about once you open the envelope, then it's harder to seal back, but my home saved seeds I usually don't save year after year.. if it's something I grow every year, then I throw out the left over seeds and collect new ones at the end of the season.

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hendi_alex
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Rainbowgardener,

What if you have a total crop failure for some specific crop one year? Wouldn't it would be best to wait until the end of the season to toss those old seeds? Can't really tell from your post, but sounds like you toss the old seeds right after planting.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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rainbowgardener
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saving seed

I do often get rid of extra home grown seeds right after planting (I don't do that with seeds I bought). If I had a crop failure, then maybe that would mean something was wrong with the seeds. Anyway, I can always buy more if I have to. Buying seeds is way cheaper than buying plants. I just like saving my own seed because it seems so cool and earth-mothery...

I'm not a commercial operation, very small scale, although I do produce several hundred little plants out of my basement seed starting operation every year. Sell a couple hundred as a fund raiser for my church, probably give most of another hundred away and plant the rest (plus the ones that die along the way).

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hendi_alex
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I don't save many seeds, but seem to be gaining interest in doing so a little more each year. Last year I saved a large number of flower seeds. Recently have started saving dill and arugula seeds, but that is about it. I'm also starting to root more cuttings from perennials.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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