klancenet
Full Member
Posts: 13
Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2009 9:38 pm

Lack of sun, will my peppers stop producing?

I just noticed that my pepper plants are producing, I have 5 different kinds but the thai and jalapeno are just starting to produce peppers. It has been rainy and cloudy for the past week and will be for another week. I know that pepper plants love the hot direct sun, so will this stop the pepper productions for a while? Oh, and I'm located in Massachusetts if anyone was curious.

Also I bought water soluble miracle grow and it says to water indoor plants with 1 tsp into a gal of water once every 2 weeks and to water outdoor plants with 1 tbs into a gal once a week. My peppers are in containers on my fire escape so I'm not sure if they are concidered indoor or outdoor because their not planted in the ground.

Thanks in advance for any advice.

pepper4
Green Thumb
Posts: 636
Joined: Fri Mar 20, 2009 12:08 pm
Location: Ohio

Hi! My understanding peppers are slow growers, I have 6 different plants in containers. Bell, Sweet red and bananna peppers. I consider them outside plants because they are dealing with the elements. I wouldn't worry alot (advice I got because I did) My peppers have went through chilly, alot of sun, too much rain and dry spells. Your weather conditions may slow the growth a bit but if they look healthy and have some fruit they will probably be fine. As some wise people told me, hang in there and be patient. Never dealt with miracle grow so no advise on that. Good luck :D
Bambi

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

peppers

The cloudy rainy weather shouldn't keep the plants from producing peppers, but it will keep them from ripening up. That's a very slow process in peppers any way and I don't usually let them ripen up until near the end of the season, because having a bunch of peppers on the plant ripening tends to slow it down from making anhy more.

User avatar
splat42069
Senior Member
Posts: 139
Joined: Mon Jun 01, 2009 1:00 pm
Location: Eastern PA

They will be fine. Here in P.A. the last month was 85% rainy days, and mine are still alive.

I use miracle grow for my plants but usually at only 1/2 the dose it says.

klancenet
Full Member
Posts: 13
Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2009 9:38 pm

Ok great, I was even concidering bringing them in because I thought they were getting too much water, they seem to be growing faster with all the rain, wierd.

Also I was wondering what can I expect for pepper productions? I have a jalapeno, thai, habanero, cayenne and tabasco. Looking at pictures it seems like I'll be getting a lot of thai's.

User avatar
splat42069
Senior Member
Posts: 139
Joined: Mon Jun 01, 2009 1:00 pm
Location: Eastern PA

I have never grown them varietys.. I have all sweet and bell peppers growing.

User avatar
Drumopelli
Full Member
Posts: 31
Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2009 1:01 am
Location: Glendale, AZ

Rain is good. Despite the plant getting watered, rain will have a lot of micro-nutrients. Just be careful they don't get too much water. If they appear wilted or yellowing, that is too much water. Rain for a few days is alright though.

I have 30 different types of peppers growing. My Thai's are just producing. It took a while but now they have exploded in peppers. :lol:

My jalapenos have been producing since late April, but the peppers have been small.

I am just now getting habaneros (orange) and should get them through September. Habaneros are mid to late bloomers. Hotter peppers usually are. In MA, you may be looking at sometime in August and the production will be limited because of the short season afforded by the climate there.

I live in AZ with 110 degree full sun and I'm still waiting for Scotch Bonnets and Bhut Jolokias which prolly won't produce until August or September.

I'm already getting cayenne peppers out the ying yang. They are an early season pepper. You should start seeing buds very soon.

Tabasco must be a mid-season bloomer. I'm still waiting too.

Fertilizing: If the plants are potted, be sparse on the MG and only use it once or twice a month. You could try fish emuslion too. Pepper plants love it and it is less harsh than MG. I've had tremendous results using fish emulsion.

Indoor/outdoor: If they are outside, they must be outdoor. You will have a short season, but you can take the plants inside over the winter and they may survive to next year. If they do, and as established plants, they will produce much more fruit quicker next year.
My short term memory isn't what it used to be. Also, my short term memory isn't what it used to be.

Return to “Vegetable Gardening Forum”