patricia hilbert
Full Member
Posts: 23
Joined: Mon May 04, 2009 1:07 pm
Location: central massachusetts

My roots are showing

this could qualify as the dumb question of the day, but here it is: Do root vegetables (potatoes,beets, onions,etc.) require a lot of sunlight? I have a garden spot that has become very shady because of very tall pine and maple trees. I'd like to use it for something!!!


Patricia
pat

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

gardening in shade

I'm assuming from the examples you gave that when you say you want to use your shady spot for something, you mean something edible. There's tons of nice flowers and foliage plants that do well in shade. Veggies and herbs are a lot harder, most of them really want lots of sun.

That said, there are some herbs and veggies that will tolerate part sun, even if not thriving as much. But part sun usually means getting some direct sun just not all day. A totally shady spot is really hard. One thing you can think about if possible is limbing up or thinning the trees. Limbing up is just taking bottom branches off. Thinning is taking out a random selection of branches. Both would let more light through.

Edibles that are more tolerant of less sun include green leafies like lettuce, spinach, swiss chard, mustard and collard greens, arugula, endive, cress, and radicchio , cabbage , parsley. Other veggies include broccoli , cauliflower, peas, beets, brussels sprouts, radishes. Some fruits also do well without a lot of sunlight, including blueberries, raspberries, hardy kiwi, strawberries, blackberries. Many herbs grow well without much sun. Mint plants, for example, grow well in the shade (because mint is crazy adaptable--meaning it will take over the place, think about planting it in pots). Others that tolerate though not necessarily thriving in reduced light are sage, dill, oregano, borage, chamomile and several kinds of thyme, tarragon.

But note re the veggies, most of the ones that are on the list are there because they are cool weather crops that do not like the heat of summer. So here at basically the beginning of June is probably too late for starting them. But you can plant seeds of all the green leafies in August for a fall crop.

patricia hilbert
Full Member
Posts: 23
Joined: Mon May 04, 2009 1:07 pm
Location: central massachusetts

thanks

rainbowgardener

Got your reply to my inquiry. HELPFUL INFO. thankyou.


Patricia
pat

Return to “Vegetable Gardening Forum”