Rosie51
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Garlic and Onions

I am wondering if anyone knows about growing garlic. I planted some last Fall and they have not developed into bulbs. Maybe I need to wait more. They are green and are looking better after seeming to be pretty dormant during winter.

Also some of my garlic developed pods on top with what looks like "seeds" ?? Anyone know about these? Should I plant them and see what happens? :)

Last Fall I harvested some tiny little onions from my "seeds" from the Spring before. Are these what is called "onion sets" ??? I did replant them again this Spring already and they are growing. Last year I planted sets and I got some HUGE humongous onions--several six inches across! They were the yellow winter onions. And they kept really well all winter. I am down to my last few now.

But how do onions and garlic work from seed to final product?

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!potatoes!
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re: garlic: it's too early, let them grow another few months. those flower spikes they send up, scapes, are delicious and can be eaten.

TZ -OH6
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Garlic is odd in that it does not produce seed so it must be planted from cloves. Growth during short days and cool weather induces the young plant to form cloves. Warm weather and longer days make the plant mature, which is why you do not get many cloves when you wait until spring to plant. I guess it is similar to plants like carrots or cilantro bolting to form reproductive structures.

Burnet
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This is normal - your garlic is still just barely starting. Winter gives it a good solid start, but it still needs to grow all spring and deep into summer.

Burnet

Rosie51
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thanks everyone--looks like I just need to be patient!! :)

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hendi_alex
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This is a first year for growing regular garlic as well. Couldn't resist, had to peek a couple weeks ago, but no sign of swelling bulbs yet. Seed scapes have started forming on some, so the tips were snapped off. Garlic plants are large and healthy looking for the most part. Some are being grown in enriched soil and others are being grown in a compost/synthetic soil mix. Hope I'm not getting all top growth, as the mix is pretty rich. My varieties, chosen to perform well in the south, seem to be doing much better than was the case with my previous attempt at growing regular garlic. Have had quite a bit of luck with elephant garlic, but that eventually became a little too tame for our taste. At this point am feeling optimistic about the prospects of having a good harvest, but is probably still six to eight weeks away.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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Rob
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I wish I could remember the blog, but I've lost it.
The gardener had lots of pictures and details of her progress with garlic.

She planted her cloves in the late summer /early fall. They grew for a while, then went dormant, and then in the spring greened up again. By the end of the late summer, she had the most stunning garlic I think I've ever seen.

So, simply basing my input off that lost blog, and a few other snippets I've read here and there: you're right on track.
Keep those babies in the ground until the late summer!

Onions seem to be different. You can plant them in the spring, and get good results by the end of the growing season. Someone correct me if I'm wrong on this.

Anyhow, I screwed up and planted my garlic but a few weeks ago. I'm not expecting anything very spectacular by summers end. However, I will separate the cloves of one or two of the results, and put them in the ground to overwinter for the next season.
What happens in the event horizon, stays in the event horizon.

tin gizel
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another vote for patience....

I planted garlic last fall. It all sprouted up and stayed green all winter. now that warm days and sunshine are the norm, they've really greened up and grown more.

I pulled one up just to see what was going on....looked more like a wild onion than garlic.

I intend to leave them be until late summer and have enough garlic to last me through to the following spring.

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hendi_alex
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Garlic seems to be doing well to me. What do you think? Is my first year growing regular garlic since a dismal attempt several years ago. At that time didn't know that some varieties tolerate southern climates while others don't.

I've got about 100 plants growing along the edges of several beds. Here are a few photos.

[img]https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3611/3463573984_2d69e5370f.jpg[/img]

[img]https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3633/3462758377_5564975fbe.jpg[/img]

[img]https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3661/3463572976_be81a0596e.jpg[/img]
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

Rosie51
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Beautiful pictures!



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