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BrianSkilton
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Peppers: Are they Different Plants & Can Be Cross Bred?

I've heard the green, red, yellow, orange bell peppers all come from different plants. I'm very positive the red, yellow and orange are all different plants however is the red and green pepper different plants? I think not...am I wrong? Another thing, is a orange / yellow pepper mature when its orange/yellow (it can't go red can it?) Also can all peppers cross with other peppers. For example what can the poblano cross with?

Just thought I would try to set some things straight. I've heard arguments from both ends... :?

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hendi_alex
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I've grown red, yellow, and orange bell peppers, all of which started out green and gradually matured to the color of their variety. Most, if not all, bell peppers that are sold as green will ripen to red. I believe that the bell pepper plants that are marketed as 'red' have been selected and named based upon having superior color and form when ripe. I know at Sam's club, you can buy a six pack of common red bell peppers for under $4, but if you buy a multicolor six pack of yellow, orange, and red, the price is closer to $7. The red bell peppers in the more expensive pack have a nicer color and form than the more 'common' red bell peppers.
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petalfuzz
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Hmmm, let's see:

There is a variety of bell pepper that matures from ivory to orange to red. It is called Romanian rainbow and I will be growing it this year. But most "green" bell peppers will mature to red if left on the plant (for example, most will be about 70 days to green but 90 days to red). If you want a mature yellow or orange pepper, then the variety will have to say that. Usually seed catalogs picture the pepper when mature, but all will start out green. (So Yes, different plants for different colors).

As far as crossing peppers, yes they are horribly promiscuous. But if a hot pepper crosses with a mild pepper in season 1, the fruit off the mild plant will be mild, but if seed is saved and planted the next season, the fruit will be hot! Any pepper crossed with hot will be hot (in most cases anyway--of course there are degrees of hotness). But I've never heard of people breeding hybrids of peppers for fun, guess that's more of a tomato thing. But it's certainly doable. I'd just caution about eating the peppers before you know just how hot it might be!

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BrianSkilton
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Thanks for the info guys. Quick question, I saved some bell peppers seeds from the store. I took seeds from a store bought poblano (very dark green), red bell, orange bell and yellow bell. The poblano seeds came up and look great, as did the red. The yellow I just am starting and the orange I will start later.

[img]https://www.fiercegaming.com/garden/Feb-23.JPG[/img]
Poblano Sprouts from store bought pepper.

My question is will I get just a plant and no peppers (because the Poblano was green) or will I get true Poblano peppers or perhaps it crossed with something else? I don't really care I guess what I get cause it would be interesting however will I get fruit at all? Same goes to the red/orange/yellow.

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BrianSkilton
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anyone know for sure? :?:
Why buy produce when you can grow it?
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cynthia_h
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I think you may be the pioneer, letting us know your results.

To find a definitive answer, it may be necessary to read experimental data in horticultural/agricultural/botanical/other scientific journals.

Maybe someone who posts later in the season will be able to tell you; if no one has answered by the end of the weekend, journals will def. be the way to go. Go visit your local public library and ask at the information/research desk; librarians live for this kind of interesting question!

Cynthia H.
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BrianSkilton
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Thanks for the reply Cynthia, I haven't ran across to many people that have tried it, so I will let you guys know what happens this season. I am pretty sure I will get fruit, just not sure what kinda. Well, I am off to germinate some more pepper seeds, "tequila sunrise" and more Fushimi.
Why buy produce when you can grow it?
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TZ -OH6
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I'm a little confused by your poblano question, but if your seed became a plant, that plant can/will produce peppers. Could the poblano seed be crossed?...Commercial fields are so big that crossing with another variety is unlikely, and based on what the seed companies are offering chances are good that the poblano variety was not a hybrid so you should get exactly what came from the store when your plant fruits.
The bells are another matter, many of those varieties are hybrids so you can expect some genetic segregation and a variety of outcomes from seed you planted from a store bought pepper. The fruit will probably be similar (color) but size, flavor, vigor might be different than what was in the farmer's field.

Hope this helps

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hendi_alex
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TZ's post reflects my view. Started to post almost the exact comments the other day, but as was not familiar with poblano, held off.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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BrianSkilton
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Thanks guys. TZ -OH6, that really helps, and clears things up. I did also plant some store bought bell pepper, so who knows what will come up there. I didn't know Commercial Poblano peppers were not hybrids so thanks for clearing that up. Either way, I will see what happens, but more than likley the plant will produce poblano peppers.
Why buy produce when you can grow it?
-Nick



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