grandpasrose
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I think I said that a couple of post ago "like all good things in life they are only good when used in moderation"! :lol:
Glad we have the same conclusion! :wink:
VAL
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opabinia51
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Yes, I just wanted to correct the statement that you made about the neem oil not harming beneficials.

Of course, for anyone reading this thread: Neem Oil does not have a huge detrimental effect on beneficials but, it can if used to often.

I'm also glad that we have come to the same conclusions Val.

opabinia51
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Bump

jstr12
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It would also affect the food chain. Ladybugs would either move out or starveif there were no bugs to eat. Then again the ladybug couldn't be doin' much good if you have to use neem oil! :lol: I don't think it's just the good things in life that must be used moderation, it's just the bad things in life shouldn't be used at all! :wink:

jstr :D
Jstr =D

grandpasrose
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Rather than repeat everything I have just written, please refer to the post made in the Rose Gardening General Discussion Forum under the Japanese Beetle thread. The post date is July 18. It contains the results of research I have done regarding impacts on several types of insects. :wink:

Val
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

zenharmonic
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hi new to this forum, found it by looking at the food forest thread, you will see me there to. My thoughts on spraying anything is long term, in my few short years of gardining ive found that trying to rid your garden of any bugs just makes more bugs. If left alone and the garden will find balance and no one bug will take over. PS: the more plant species the more preditory bugs, weeds are good!

AngryItalian
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a quick question: does neem oil deter ants? I found ants in 2 of my potted plants and so i was wondering if that would get rid of them eventually

opabinia51
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I think that it might but, discussions in the forums have come to the conclusion that ground cinnamon is the best way to detur ants. Cloves were used for something else.

Just use the in forum search engine found at the top of the page and look for ants to find the discussions on the topic.

As to Neem Oil, I would read through the information contained above to find out if it would help, if memory serves; I think it would but, I would recommending checking above before using it.

Keep in mind that you should only use it about once a week so as not to harm beneficial insects such as Bees which are taking a real beating in North America.

TheBigEasy
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Re: Neem Oil

opabinia51 wrote:
Our answer to insect problems is usually: Neem Oil. but, I think that it is important that people know about Neem Oil and it's effects. (Not to say that it is a really bad thing :wink: )

Anyway, I recommend that people give this thread a read.
I've read through this thread, and I think I may give it a whirl to try and help out my banana tree. The thing was very healthy and had a few offshoots and I was looking to put it into a half barrel in a week or so, (I still live in an apartment, so I cannot yet put it into the ground) and I noticed a whole lot of little tiny black bugs that seem to be hanging out near between the leaves and the trunk. Not sure what they are, but they sure seem to have caused some harm to the tree and I've got to do something, so ]this neem oil seems like a good bet to try, especially with all of your recommendations.

Thanks

opabinia51
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Sounds to me like you may have aphids, these little pests puncture the plant and eat it's sap.

Anyway, soapy water seems to be the trick for aphids.

TheBigEasy
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opabinia51 wrote:Sounds to me like you may have aphids, these little pests puncture the plant and eat it's sap.

Anyway, soapy water seems to be the trick for aphids.
Thank you. Just spray away? Dish soap maybe?

opabinia51
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Yep, dish soap will do the trick.

TheBigEasy
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opabinia51 wrote:Yep, dish soap will do the trick.
Thank you much! I'll give it a whirl.

Newt
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Here's a recipe for home made insecticidal soap. Be sure NOT to use anything that has detergent, but only soap.
https://www.care2.com/channels/solutions/outdoors/194

Newt

gmreeves
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I have been placing my herbs and tomato seedlings outside for the whole day and I noticed that my squash, zuchinni, and cucumbers (which are already in the ground) are covered in aphids. I squirted them with water to get rid of them but am thinking of spraying neem oil on all of my plants tonight when I bring them in. Will spraying neem oil on my seedlings hurt them since they are so young?

a white rabbit
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opabinia51 wrote:Sounds to me like you may have aphids, these little pests puncture the plant and eat it's sap.

Anyway, soapy water seems to be the trick for aphids.
..yup, wot 'e said..

..any piercing insect just hates to get yuk-sticky on its piercing parts, add a tadge of neem or rotenone and you'l nail 'em coming and going..

Inamon
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So as a new gardener I'm still finding my feet. neem is mentioned alot as the way to go to get rid of bugs, so I sprayed last night with a ready mixed store bought batch. Things looked good this morning and through the day but now that I am home at night (11pm) my melon plants seem to be in very bad condition.
The leaves have assumed a brown, splotchy tinge, as have the vines. Some of the leaves have just plain old collapsed in the midle and others still are fine. (the neem oil mix looks a light muddy brown in the bottle. I follwed the instructions printed on the back)

Is this the neem? Too much? Will my melon plants be ok?

jaylivg
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will neem oil help to get rid of june beetles ?

opabinia51
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Yes, it may. Neem Oil disrupts the molting process of most insects, if not all. But, be gentle when using Neem Oil, this is a general, broad based organic insecticide that is harmful to insects but, not humans. The Bee popuation in North America is under serious threat.

I recommned using Neem Oil not more that 3 times a week. And just spray in on plants that are affected by the June Beetles.

tlang
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Neem Oil

I will use the neem oil, (after I search for it), because I don't feel I have any other choice if I want to grow anything for more than a month. I also did NOT plant the sunflowers this year, which were COVERED in the black stink bugs. Also I planted honeysuckle, blackberries, trumpet vine, climbing roses, passion flower, and more honeysuckle on the opposite side of my property that my garden is on, in hopes that it will balance for the bee's.
I'll post when I see any results with the neem oil. Thanks ya'll for all the helpfull info.

opabinia51
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You are most welcome, that's why we are here. I look forward to hearing your results.

damethod
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Can I spray Neem Oil on Fruits and Vegetables?

Thanks!

opabinia51
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You betcha! Scott Reil (the original Helpful Gardener) did it on a regular basis. I would personally wash the fruit before eating it but, Scott didn't.

Also, Neem is used in bath products as well. I was quite astounded when I saw Neem Oil Soap and Bath Bombs! But, that is a side issue.

alisios
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opabinia51 wrote:The Bee popuation in North America is under serious threat.
Honey Bees, right? AFAIK, the native solitary sees such as the leafcutter and mason bees have their chance to make a comeback now... which is why I just built a bee house for solitary bees.

opabinia51
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Yes, I have Mason bee homes in my garden as well. But, from what I have heard it is native Bees in general. If someone knows for sure, let us know.

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Emerald
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I am a bit new to this Neem Oil. I will say it sounds like a miracle worker next to insecticides. I have used 7 dust in the past but would like to get away from it. I read where neem oil also helps to stop fungus and other problems? That would be awesome. I would like to know a little more about moderation here. Do you spray it directly on the plant in a fine spray? Would you only use it every few weeks or just when you start to have insect, fungus problems?


Thanks in advance for any input. “I LOVE THIS SITEâ€
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opabinia51
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The key to stopping fungus problems to allow beneficial fungal and microflora to grow. Aerated compost tea do a really great trick. In some places you can buy these teas but, usually you have to brew them youselves.

If you try to kill most diseases in the long term you will most likely lose to an arms race. So, work with nature, it has been controlling disease for millions of years and is very good at it.

cynthia_h
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I have Green Light's "Rose Defense" and have brought it to the computer so that I can enter information from its label into this post.

"For Control of Blackspot, Powdery Mildew, Rust, Spider Mites, Aphids, Whiteflies on Roses on Ornamental Plants.

"Active Ingredients:
"Clarified Hydrophobic Extract of Neem Oil...90%
"Inert Ingredients......................................10%

"Bring this product to room temerature before mixing. Shake well before using.
"Dilution Rate: Mix 1 ounce (2 Tbsp. [approx. 15 mL]) in 1 gallon of water [approx. 4 L] above 55 degrees."

The label cautions against disposing of unused product in intertidal areas or where it could reach bodies of water. The product is toxic to fish, according to Sunset's Western Garden Book.

Sunset (p. 667): "Neem oil (Rose Defense and others): Used to prevent and control black spot, powdery mildews, and some other foliar diseases. (Also used as an insecticide and miticide.) Toxic to fish."

Also from Sunset (p. 685): "Azadirachtin, neem oil (Bioneem; Fruit, Nut, and Vegetable Spray; Rose Defense; others). Azadirachtin (neem extract) is derived from a tropical tree (Azadiracta indica). It repels pests and, once ingested, interrupts their growth cycle, killing larvae as well as adults. Effective against aphids, beetles, caterpillars, grasshoppers, leaf miners, mealybugs, root weevils, whiteflies, others. Neem oil (primarily the oil of the neem seed) controls insects in egg, larval, and adult stages; it also controls mites and some plant diseases. Mix with warm water before spraying. Both azadirachtin and neem oil can kill nontarget insects such as honeybees and lady beetles. Toxic to fish."

I have used Rose Defense on my roses a couple of times this season. I also have lots of visiting bees. I carefully time my use of the neem product and apply it to the plants LATE IN THE AFTERNOON, after the bees have "gone home for the night."

I have observed bees visiting the plants the next day, but by then the product has dried overnight. I still have lots of bees visiting; they enjoy not only the roses, but my lavender, blackberries, and wild (well, volunteer...) valerian. They've also visited my yellow squash and zucchini plants, b/c those are setting fruit. Based on the name of at least one product (Fruit, Nut, and Vegetable Spray) named by Sunset, this oil is safe to apply to edibles. Unfortunately, other than Rose Defense being 90% neem oil and the dilution rate in water, I have no data re. a "safe" strength or purity of neem oil to be applied to edibles.

People on the Indian subcontinent have used the neem tree and its leaves, twigs, branches, and oil for millennia, both for personal health and for other applications.

This is all the information I have; I'm glad I found this thread.

Cynthia H.
USDA Zone 9, Sunset Zone 17

doccat5
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It takes very little Neem Oil to do the job. This is again, read and follow the directions. Works wonderfully, I've been using it for years with great
success. It's one of those things that you rarely have to use if you have good balance in your garden.
doccat5

I'd rather be gardening!

Amelia
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Hey everybody...... great site!

FYI - while neem doesn't seem to have much effect on spiders overall, I can attest to the fact that a direct hit upon black widow spiders will ultimately kill them...... although I wish I didn't have this knowledge. I have killed a dozen or so juveniles already this year with neem - as a test.

To Cynthia - a couple posts up - my concern with your pre-packaged 'neem' spray would be the 'inert' ingredients. Neem oil alone is not harmful to fish. Who knows what is hidden in that 10%?

yumoOo
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where can I find neem oil?

can I find it at home depot or lowes?

The Rookie
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Amelia-

I was told by the person at the nursery I bought the Neem Oil from that H20 is the inert ingredient. I have no way of verifying this.

I too was worried about the 10% of inert ingredients when purchasing the product.

Jason

Chris C
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I've not seen the Green Light brand in my area, but Ferti-lome's Rose, Flower & Vegetable Spray is 70% NEEM. (Unlike 90% for Green Light) I've been using it on my vegetables and am very pleased. Are all the bugs gone? No..............but this is the most bug free organic garden I've ever had!
Chris

maveriiick
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Try to get Dyna-Gro

https://www.bustan.ca/product_detail.asp?menuID=5&SID=33&PID=680

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Thanks, I'll check into that for next season..........as I have more than enough to finish this one.
Chris

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I was out of town most of last summer when I found that my shade house was hit by a very bad case mealy bugs, over 300 plants had them and I lost around 10. not bad but not good,but after I started to use neem oil I didn't have mealy bugs, as the plants started to flower I found that the bees and butterflies still came around I even had more bees than before, I mix neem with water so its not as strong but I spray 2 times a week, this summer I will take care of the shade house my self to make sure things are OK, I won't be with out neem oil it helped save all my plants.

Bear
My Mother is earth, my Father is the sun, My sister is the wind, I'm Bear the keeper of the caves

Chris C
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I used Neem all Summer and had very few pests in my garden. The only one it didn't work on was the Squirrel......:twisted: .....but the hot wire took care of him!!!!! :D
Chris

Toil
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I just read through the thread, and thought there were some basic assumptions made by some, but not shared by others. So a little 101, beyond where it comes from.

Raw neem oil contains all the anti-feedant, growth regulating, and other sophisticated goodies. You are not going to see it at home depot. Google dyna-grow, and I think there is a brand called einstein oil. They are sold as "leaf polish".

The "neem oil" sold on most store shelves and labeled as an insecticide is basically just oil. It's neem oil minus the neem. It works! But so would mineral or vegetable oil.

There is also an extract that contains the "main ingredient" (I think you need them all together).

My bottle of dyna grow disagrees with the dyna-grow website on concentration. But here is my recipe. Does not burn plants like the "original recipe".

1qt warm water

0.5-1 tsp of neem oil

.25-.5 tsp soap

Add the neem oil and soap to a bit of the water, then use a hand blender to make an emulsion (VERY IMPORTANT). Then add the rest. In a sprayer, the emulsion will hold for days, so you will get uniform tiny droplets, and no big, suffocating globs. oh yeah, when you scale the recipe up, you don't need a bigger blender. As long as you have oil, soap, and a bit of water, you are good. It will disperse perfectly into the bigger container.

I learned this summer it doesn't phase ladybugs - or their cousins, the squash beetle. You still have to pick those off by hand. (chopsticks helps)
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gixxerific
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Picking off ladybugs is a crime! :P It is punishable by aphid infestation.
Ladybugs, also called lady beetles or ladybird beetles, are a very beneficial group. They are natural enemies of many insects, especially aphids and other sap feeders. A single lady beetle may eat as many as 5,000 aphids in its lifetime.
Peace, Dono

P.s. hopefully you were talking about picking off the squash beetle. :D

Toil
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yes, the squash beetle, not the ladybird beetle. They are very very closely related. For a week I thought I was blessed with a swarm of ladybugs. Until I looked closer and watched them eating my kabochas! I think it's the only herbivore of the family.

It's not the adults that make my skin crawl. I just crush them with my fingers. It's the freaky looking larvae.
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