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applestar
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GREEN LACEWINGS, Garden Patrol Sucking Insects/Eggs Squad

Green Lacewing adults are delicate looking things, and their eggs are displayed artfully on delicate thin stalks.
Green Lacewing eggs on a pea pod
Green Lacewing eggs on a pea pod
But their larvae are voracious eaters of almost all sucking insects in their adult and/or larval forms, as well as red spider mites and some moth eggs.

So I was very happy to spot a green lacewing larva on a squash blossom inside my SVB susceptible winter squash protection tunnel:
Green Lacewing larva munching on aphids
Green Lacewing larva munching on aphids
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rainbowgardener
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Re: GREEN LACEWINGS, Garden Patrol Sucking Insects/Eggs Squa

who wudda thunk a pretty thing like a lacewing starts out like that? ! :)
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shadylane
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Re: GREEN LACEWINGS, Garden Patrol Sucking Insects/Eggs Squa

That is great info to know about lacewings- Thanks applestar
Could pass off as a lady bug nymph similarity in looks, only needs red orange color.

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applestar
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Re: GREEN LACEWINGS, Garden Patrol Sucking Insects/Eggs Squa

I was picking strawberries yesterday, and when I reached for one very lovely red ripe berry, there was a green lacewing eggstalk attached to it, so...

... I didn't pick it... I left it to chance....

If the robins and catbirds didn't/doesn't find the berry, it may survive. :bouncey:
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