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GardenRN
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Slugicide

Well, It's one o'clock in the morning. And I just spent an hour outside killing slugs. I decided to take the night tour of my garden just to see what I would find. I have heard from other members that a night view offers a whole host of things not found during the day. For me it was just slugs, hundreds of them! ....And some flying insect that kept biting my back and shoulders as I was salting slugs.

Most of them I threw in a bucket and added salt occasionally so as not to get a bunch of salt in my garden soil. The ones I saw on the ground I just salted as they were. In case anyone was wondering, slugs have a particular liking for snap bean leaves and Daikon Radish greens. And I saw lots of shiny slug trails on the carrots, but didn't actually find any slugs there. Also no damage to the carrot tops.

I'm wondering if there is something organic I can lay along the edge of my containers to keep them out. I have heard of copper, has anyone ever tried that? I have also heard of running a 9 volt battery attached to a wire that goes along the perimeter, but I don't really want to be replacing batteries all summer long. :roll:

If I can't find something I'm just gonna have to spend summer nights in the back yard with just me and a can of morton's! :twisted:
Jeff

USDA Zone 7a, Sunset Zone 32.

Failure is only a fact when you give up.

cynthia_h
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Less damaging to your soil will be tossing those slugs into a bucket of soapy, salted water as you go along. :twisted:

Horrible, filthy little blighters, aren't they? See my thread on the [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=249191#249191]2012 Snail Season[/url] for an update chez moi.

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

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rainbowgardener
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Diatomaceous earth works against them or anything else really sharp or rough. Put broken up eggshells around your plants or all kinds of rough or abrasive or tangling things can act as a physical barrier without killing them... they have to flow across the ground to get to your plants. So pine needle mulch, sweet gum tree seed balls, sandpaper, roof shingles, bark mulch, gravel chips, clothes drier lint, hair or pet fur.
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

mattie g
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Location: Northern VA, USA -- Zone 7a

rainbowgardener wrote:Diatomaceous earth works against them or anything else really sharp or rough. Put broken up eggshells around your plants or all kinds of rough or abrasive or tangling things can act as a physical barrier without killing them... they have to flow across the ground to get to your plants. So pine needle mulch, sweet gum tree seed balls, sandpaper, roof shingles, bark mulch, gravel chips, clothes drier lint, hair or pet fur.
Interesting. I thought I was just lucky in not having trouble with slugs, but I suppose it's most likely the fact that I lay down hardwood mulch around my plants.

CynthiaCollado
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Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico

Great Suggestion

I have a hard time with slugs as well. I am going to try your idea of surrounding the plants with Diatomaceous earth and see if that slows them down.

They really tear up my garden so I willing to try anything.

Thanks for the idea

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GardenRN
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mattie g wrote:
rainbowgardener wrote:Diatomaceous earth works against them or anything else really sharp or rough. Put broken up eggshells around your plants or all kinds of rough or abrasive or tangling things can act as a physical barrier without killing them... they have to flow across the ground to get to your plants. So pine needle mulch, sweet gum tree seed balls, sandpaper, roof shingles, bark mulch, gravel chips, clothes drier lint, hair or pet fur.
Interesting. I thought I was just lucky in not having trouble with slugs, but I suppose it's most likely the fact that I lay down hardwood mulch around my plants.
no, you're just lucky. The slugs find the mulch to be a fantastic place to hang out and lay their eggs. :roll:
Jeff

USDA Zone 7a, Sunset Zone 32.

Failure is only a fact when you give up.

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sheeshshe
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ugh. I'm having major problems too. its a wet few weeks and it is slugville! my poor daughters plants :(
Sheila, gardening on the zone 4b/5a line.

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