Tonio
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Posts: 357
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2012 3:07 pm
Location: San Diego, CA !! Z10/SS24

Hippodamia Convergens to the rescue

Hippodamia Convergens or not , the regular labybugs are your gardens friend !!

We've had a aphid infestation on........ aeoniums. We have alot of aeoniums around the house.- pots, in ground-everywhere. This time of year is aphid war for us in So Cal.

So, we employed ol' ladybeetle to the task... all I can say is why haven't we done this earlier
:)

Only regret is that I could have taken a picture before/after journal.. dratsss. :evil:

T
San Diego / Z10
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bg
Cool Member
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Joined: Sat Sep 11, 2010 9:45 pm
Location: Houston Area

I tried last year, since I had a bad infestation of aphids. First 1500 batch came in and well, I basically just fed the ants. the rest just flew away after being released, after a day or two. So that was like 4000 ladybugs lol. Still had a to battle those ants and aphids/eggs.

Glad you had some luck with yours though. I'm lucky none of my plants were devastated, and everything turned out fine in the end. Maybe things will be different this year!

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rainbowgardener
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Location: TN/GA 7b

If you are going to release ladybugs, it helps to do it in small batches in different spots and different days. Release them in the evening, just after dark, so they will settle in and not fly away right away. Release them right after rain or watering, so they will have something to drink.

Also there are some plants you can have in your garden that are very attractive to ladybugs, which will help lure them or keep them:

https://www.landscapeandgardentoday.com/Garden/Ladybugs2.php
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

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applestar
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Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

You can also put a screened cover or floating cover over the infested plants and release the ladybugs under the cover. Once they get the idea that there are easy meals in your garden, they might stay to breed, and once they lay their eggs on the plants, the larvae will do even more munching.

Be sure to learn what ladybug eggs, larvae, and pupa look like so you don't accidentally smush them or spray them with some kind of insecticide. :wink:

I often find ladybug eggs in apple and cherry tree leaves when the aphids start, and everything under the plum tree including the hammock and individual blades of grass gets covered with the pupae, And we have to tiptoe around until they all eclose. This is also when the warblers and virios make their rare visit in the plum tree along with the resident chickadees, nuthatches, titmice, and finches, so I think they are here for the aphids and maybe the ladybugs too (?).

Tonio
Green Thumb
Posts: 357
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2012 3:07 pm
Location: San Diego, CA !! Z10/SS24

I guess we got lucky this year- right amount of moisture/temp/time of release- at dusk? We sprayed some water to help if they needed a drink. Last year they pretty much just flew away.

RG- thanks for the link.

T
San Diego / Z10
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Tonio
Green Thumb
Posts: 357
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2012 3:07 pm
Location: San Diego, CA !! Z10/SS24

I guess we got lucky this year- right amount of moisture/temp/time of release- at dusk? We sprayed some water to help if they needed a drink. Last year they pretty much just flew away.

RG- thanks for the link.

T
San Diego / Z10
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