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gixxerific
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I just saw big foot!!!!!!!!!!

Or at least the moth version of him.

At least I think it was a moth, it was at dusk and hard to see. Of course by the time I found the camera it was gone.

But it was roughly the size of a hummingbird but what looked like moth wings. The body was curled under almost like a wasp. Like I said it was dark. Oh yeah it seemed to be trying to feed on flowers perhaps or at least that sort of here and there behavior. This was all on my tomato plants.

I know that is a bizarre description but any thought on this.

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applestar
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You mean you saw Mothra?! Did you see the little singing girls hiding in the tomatoes? :>

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No, no. That was a ChupaFlores. :lol:

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rainbowgardener
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Was it this guy?

https://www.coopext.colostate.edu/4dmg/Pests/hummingb.htm


hummingbird moth.... it's the adult of your hornworms, which might be why it was around your tomato patch.
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gixxerific
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I thought about the sphinx. I will never know it was so dark. But yes RBG it was probably that. Big ol SOB.

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rainbowgardener
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Yeah.. probably laying more hornworm eggs on your tomatoes!
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gixxerific
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rainbowgardener wrote:Yeah.. probably laying more hornworm eggs on your tomatoes!
That is not a very nice thing to say. Now go to your room and think about what you did. LOL
Last edited by gixxerific on Sun Jul 31, 2011 12:41 am, edited 1 time in total.

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applestar
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Hummingbird moth pics I posted last year:
:arrow: https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=149799#149799

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Kisal
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Maybe a Cecropia moth? I know they're in your area, because I used to catch them when I was a kid living back there. :)

[img]https://godsofadvertising.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/cecropia-moth-3.jpg[/img]

Or perhaps a Luna moth?
[img]https://msucares.com/newsletters/pests/gloworm/2001/images/luna.jpg[/img]
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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gixxerific
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Never saw it till late night so does that narrow the field?

Again it was too dark to really tell other than that thing was huge. Maybe I can capture it tonight.

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Kisal
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According to what I've read, hummingbird moths are active during the day, rather than at night, like most moths. That's why people liken them to hummingbirds. However, I can't back that with any authoritative reference, so your guess is as good as mine. ;)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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!potatoes!
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the big sphinxes, like the hornworm adults, are mostly nocturnal, unlike their smaller hummingbird moth cousins.

DoubleDogFarm
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This one came through my open window a few nights ago. At first I thought it was a bat. I caught in a jar and kept it until morning. Here it is on my deck when I released it.

[img]https://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/eric_wa/peasandmoth001.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/eric_wa/peasandmoth007.jpg[/img]

Is this a Owl Moth?

Eric

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applestar
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Mothra~~~
Mothra~~~

:lol:

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!potatoes!
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polyphemus moth, could be one of the most common giant silk moths. i used to catch quite a few as a kid.

or mothra.
or some unholy lovechild of the two.

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