reneeleann
Full Member
Posts: 18
Joined: Mon Jan 25, 2010 10:13 pm
Location: Cedar Park, TX

Can anyone suggest a SVB resistant strain?

I started my garden two years ago and it keeps expanding. :D Most problems I have been able to find solutions for on the forum but I have not been successful in defeating SVB's on my zucchini and cucumbers. Can anyone recommend a resistant strain that would do well in zone 8 (Austin, TX)? I love both of these vegetables and it saddens me that in 2 years I have harvested only 1 zucchini and 2 cucumbers. Thank you for any help.

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nedwina
Senior Member
Posts: 118
Joined: Fri Feb 05, 2010 5:28 pm
Location: CT River Valley

Re: Can anyone suggest a SVB resistant strain?

reneeleann wrote:I started my garden two years ago and it keeps expanding. :D Most problems I have been able to find solutions for on the forum but I have not been successful in defeating SVB's on my zucchini and cucumbers. Can anyone recommend a resistant strain that would do well in zone 8 (Austin, TX)? I love both of these vegetables and it saddens me that in 2 years I have harvested only 1 zucchini and 2 cucumbers. Thank you for any help.
Cucurbits (squash) are either pepos, maximas, mixtas, or moschatas. (Among a few others that generally aren't grown in the US.) Of those, the most SVB resistant are the moschatas. Because their vines aren't hollow, it's tough for the SVB worm to drill inside. They're mostly variations on the butternut squash. But not all.

Trombocino is a moschata that can be eaten when young, and has a nice flavor. Worth trying. Best trellised, but you can let them sprawl on the ground.

For a more zuccini-esque flavor, try Tatume. Which according to most sites is a pepo, but since it's vines are so dense and solid, I consider it an honorary moschata. Really good SVB resistance. They form round green squash that can be eaten at the 3-4 inch size. If left to mature, they're a small orange winter squash- but kinda stringy and low on flavor, IMO. But they're very good as a summer squash, and grill up/saute up nicely. And they make a nice decorative small pumpkin later.

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