Brand D NATURALS
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Brassicas dying

I have cabbage, broccoli, and a few cauliflower planted in several different raised beds. They have been doing well until I noticed yesterday that some of them are yellowing and the leaves are wilting. I dug some of the worst effected ones and saw no evidence of grubs or worms, but the biodegradable container I planted them in was teaming with ants. It appears that the main stem of the plants is being eatten away and is drying up, killing the plants. Could the ants be the problem or am I missing something else. What can I do organically to save the rest of my crop?
As the Lord keeps and sustains us, so must we keep and sustain our Lords creation.

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rainbowgardener
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Ants are not likely the problem. They likely are coming because there is dead plant matter. They scavenge dead stuff, they don't much eat live plants.

The peat pots could be the problem. When you dug it up what shape were the pots in? Pretty intact? Then the roots of your plants are confined in the little pot, totally root bound, and without any access to the water, air, nutrients in the ground.

NEVER plant those theoretically "biodegradable" pots. Cut them and peel them off. Throw them in your compost pile where they will biodegrade in a year or so....
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Brand D NATURALS
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Joined: Sun Jul 18, 2010 11:08 pm
Location: Leesburg, Ga

I didn't use peat pots. I made small pots from black and white newspaper and tore the bottom and top edges off of them before I planted them in the ground. Also, the root system looked really healthy except for the fact that the stem just below ground level had been damaged and was shriveling up, thus cutting off supply to the plant.
As the Lord keeps and sustains us, so must we keep and sustain our Lords creation.

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rainbowgardener
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OK sorry, I didn't quite have the picture. Yes it sounds like something is eating your plants. I still don't think the ants are likely the original cause. Cutworms can cause damage to the stems just below ground like that. If it is that, you can dig around the base of the plant in the daytime and usually find the worm in the soil near the plant. If you scroll down, this has pictures of what they look like:

https://www.thegrassmaster.com/insectproblems

They feed at night, so you could also go out at night with a flashlight and look for them.

If you have cutworms, if you plant your plants with a stiff paper or tin foil collar around them, but not touching or put a couple toothpicks in the ground next to them, it stops the cutworms from getting to your plants.
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

Brand D NATURALS
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Posts: 23
Joined: Sun Jul 18, 2010 11:08 pm
Location: Leesburg, Ga

I found a cutworm near one of my plants, so that is probably what it is. Thank you for the help. I should have left the top edge of the paper pots on when I planted the seedlings. Live and learn. Now I know. Thanks again.
As the Lord keeps and sustains us, so must we keep and sustain our Lords creation.



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