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applestar
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...aaand ANOTHER Garden Patrol, seen on the job!

Another black aphid mass cluster on the Broad Bean drew my attention. Bending for a closer look -- I was taking photos of the fantastic white flowers with the black markings anyway. A tiny, tiny, tiny trichogramma wasp was busy laying eggs ALL OVER the aphid herd.

I tried to take pictures. I'm not sure if they came out. Am having upload issues (again!) I'll come back and post photos if they're any good.

Letting your some of your lawn grass flower is a GREAT way to attract trichogramma wasps and hoverflies, etc. beneficial insects.

Toil
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now you just need to block the ants that remove the wasp eggs. :P


(music playing) IT's THE CIRCLE OF LAH-AH-IFE...


If you're thinking you should work with nature and let's not kill ants, I tell you killing ants IS nature. You are never wiping out ants, just holding an island. They are direct competitors IMO. When it comes to ants, we are the control. Never fear, they come back when you are done with your island.
There's something new growing in the Helpful Gardener Forum! Become a part of it here!

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applestar
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Good point :!: I'll put some DE around the base of the plants. :idea:

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applestar
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Hmph! Just came across this:
Adult trichogramma wasps eat nectar, sweet fluid which some plants emit and/or droppings of other insects such as aphids
https://www.butterflyfunfacts.com/trichogramma.php

Maybe it wasn't laying eggs on the aphids after all? But the way it was moving, it was definitely using the ovipositor.... :?

Ah ha! I think I mistook an Aphid Mummy Parasite/Aphidiid wasp for a Trichogramma.
https://www.inhs.illinois.edu/chf/outreach/eduresources/good/card24.htm

:clap:

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applestar
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Here are photos of the 'Windsor' Broadbean flowers. (So far, lots and lots of flowers, no sign of bean pods):
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image6950.jpg[/img]
I like the color contrast with the Pansy in DD's garden:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image6915.jpg[/img]

And the little Aphidiid wasp:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image6952.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image6954.jpg[/img]

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gixxerific
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Whoa nice pic Apple.

Either those are giant aphids or that is one teeny tiny wasp.

I have been seeing a bunch of lady bugs around but so far no aphids outside.

speedster7926
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does planting the pansies in the garden actually help with anything or are they just for looks?
Thanks for all the help and advice Daniel G.

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applestar
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Pansies are for persevering the cold winter, spring dash of color, joy, and wonder, ... and for EATING THE FLOWERS! :wink:

These have sweetly fragrant flowers too, and no doubt pollinators visit as well. :D

speedster7926
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you eat the flowers of pansies
Thanks for all the help and advice Daniel G.

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applestar
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Don't knock it until you've tried it. :wink:

The flower petals look beautiful in salad and whole flowers as garnish in general. I wouldn't eat the flowers off the plants you just bought from the big box store, obviously. Mine have been growing for a full year in my organically maintained garden, so I consider the new flowers this spring safe to eat.

Here is a [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=130522#130522]thread on edible flowers[/url] with links to other threads.

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