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Can anyone ID these cacti, and this succulent?

Posted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 11:29 pm
by baileysup
I bought them last year with no identification. The one cactus in the middle kinda looks like a mini San Pedro variety, but just skinny at the base. The one succulent looks a lot like an Aloe Aristata to me, but would like someone to verify that. Thanks

[img]https://i1110.photobucket.com/albums/h447/baileysup/001-3.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i1110.photobucket.com/albums/h447/baileysup/002-3.jpg[/img][/img]

Posted: Sun Apr 01, 2012 12:59 pm
by baileysup
There are cactus ID sites on the web that I will research on. Many different cacti out there, but I'll try

Posted: Sun Apr 01, 2012 1:52 pm
by lorax
The succulent is Haworthia, probably H. attenuata 'Zebrina' - next to it in the picture appears to be an Aloe, but how much light have you been giving it? It shouldn't be that tall and stretched out - it's reaching for more light.

On the cacti, the right and left are Mamillaria; I'm terrible with identifying the species, though. The middle one is Echinopsis.

Posted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 1:00 am
by baileysup
Thanks for the reply. I thought that Haworthia had no stem to it. The one I have looks like it has a stem in the center for sure. Do Haworthias have stems? Also, someone had said that the middle cactus was a "Myrtillocactus Geometrizans"..........lol. I'll see if I can find any pics. You couldn't be more right about the light situation. The cats that she has are bad at knocking over my plants, and they can't take anymore abuse. I think I finally have a good window for them all, so they should do much better this year. Also, I stopped putting all my succulents out in direct sun, except my jade, and of course my cacti. I know my aloes dislike direct sun, and they get burned. I've been told that the stripped succulent would not like direct sun either, so he stays in the window. What do you think of Haworthias having stems though?

Posted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 1:18 am
by baileysup
Yea I looked up pics of the Myrtillocactus Geometrizans and the spines looked completely different than the ones on my cactus (much thicker and larger). You must be right then. Still wondering what you think about Haworthias having stems though.

OK, this is what I found on this awesome succulent iD site. The succulent is definitely not a Haworthia attenua, because I've seen them in real life before, and it's not my plant. I really think I have an Aloe Aristata, because it looks just like my plant. Keep in mind that my plant has been a bit light deprived. Even if it's not an aloe aristata, I know it's not a Haworthia though. As far as the middle cactus goes though, I basically have a San Pedro or a "mini" San Pedro, right? LOL

Posted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 1:26 am
by lorax
The stem is a direct result of not enough sunlight. I grow Haws and Aloes in full equatorial sun, and apart from some reddish coloration on them, they do just fine (and my aloes are huge).

Posted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 1:52 am
by baileysup
I've seen Attenutta Zebrina in real life before, and it's definitely not what I have. Oh yea, and about the sun, I guess if I made the transition a bit slower, they wouldn't sunburn. I just burnt the crap out of my one big aloe a few weeks ago, by putting it in direct sun. it got some damage. I guess cause it was not used to it from the winter. I think our climates are just totally different. You must have perfect weather where you are to grow plants. It's much harder for me in North East USA. Thanks for your replies

Posted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 3:15 am
by lorax
Perhaps add your location to your profile? It would be a lot easier to give you advice if we knew roughly whereabouts you are. In any case, it's never a good idea to move any plant from indoor winter quarters directly into full sun, no matter where you live - you should always step them into it so that they don't get too shocked by the transition. This goes double for succulents, which have a different photosynthetic system from most other plants, and which are very sensitive to changes in their light levels.

In terms of gardening, Ecuador is perfect in many respects, but the exact area I live in is by no means ideal for many plants. I live in a high-altitude desert, and I can't grow a nice head of lettuce to save my life, but cacti and succulents? They're definitely my thing. I have quite a few Echinopsis (which is why I can be fairly certain about your middle cactus - there are a few characteristics that Echis have that most other cacti don't), and also a fairly large collection of Aloes, Gasterias, and Haworthias.

Upon closer examination, your Haworthia might also be H. fasciata, which does stem up a bit more than H. attenuata. I can't recall which ones exactly have become popular up north lately....

Posted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 9:54 pm
by baileysup
Wow lorax! I just saw a video of your country, and it's beautiful! I've been looking at both haworthia species online, and have found the markings on the leaves to be bumpy and protruding. The markings on my plant are much smoother than the ones I'm seeing on Haworthias (they barely protrude at all. just slightly at the tip, but the rest is as smooth as Aloe Vera skin). I don't think it's a H. Fasciata either. The leaves are smooth, and not bumpy like Haworthia. Here's a better picture for you:

[img]https://i1110.photobucket.com/albums/h447/baileysup/006.jpg[/img]

Aloe A. Aristata???

Posted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 11:14 pm
by lorax
Could very well be A. aristata - the new photo clarifies things greatly. In your other photo, the leaves looked like they had much more bumpiness to them....

Posted: Tue Apr 03, 2012 12:06 am
by baileysup
LOL! My camera's not the best, but I tried messing around with the settings and found one that had a flower symbol. I don't know if it's for nature shots or close ups, but it sure takes better close ups on that setting. My simple camera surprised me with that picture. I wish to say thank you again for helping me identify all of my plants. I've read some of your other responses to other threads, and your knowledge of Cacti, and Succulents seems vast and large. Hopefully, we'll meet again in the future. Thanks