garden_mom
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Posts: 105
Joined: Tue Mar 14, 2006 12:12 am
Location: Detroit, MI

Sulphur Fungicide for Black Spot and Powdery Mildew

I have had many kinds of houseplants, but right now I have a christmas cactus that is almost as old as me (I'm 35), it was my grandmas. It finally started to bloom a few years ago for me, but not this year. I think I left it outside a little too late in the season and threw it all off. It's still only about a foot across.
I also have my son's aloe vera from school, a maidenhair fern (which has no chance because my cat always finds a way to get to it), a succulent which I can't remember the name of (something about 'jade' comes to mind), and a plant that I've been trying to grow for literally about 6 years, and it's still only 5 inches tall. However there is a weed in it that sprung up last week and is already taller than the plant! LOL
Again, no luck with houseplants, but every year my gardens are beautiful, if very small. If I can ever figure out how to attach an image, I'll put one up!
I have a question for anyone out there; I just bought some sulphur fungicide for black spot and powdery mildew because the company recommended it, but when I got it and read the instructions, there were all of these warnings about how dangerous it is to touch or breath! And this stuff is organic! Has anyone else ever used it, and what was your experience? Any other organic suggestions for black spot or powdery mildew? Thanks!

grandpasrose
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Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2005 4:21 pm
Location: Quesnel, BC, Canada - Zone 4a

Take your fungicide back to the store, and get a product called Neem oil. Following the mixing directions, spray once a week for a few weeks.

Also, remove any diseased or damaged leaves and material and destroy it. Do not put it in your compost, as it will just ruin your compost.

To prevent powdery mildew and blackspot, along with the Neem oil, try not water in the evening, as the plant leaves do not have time to dry out. The ideal is to water with ground soakers or drips, but if you can't do this then water in the morning, but not in the blazing sun!
Also, if there is no airflow through the plants, it is prime for mildew and blackspot.
This should do the trick!
Feel free to stop in if you need more help! :wink:

Val
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

opabinia51
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Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 9:58 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

What is the actual chemical forumula on the package? I should think that a sulphar fungicide would not be organic. (organic chemicals can and do have sulphar in them but, I'd be sketptical about a fungicide being organic)

Yes, and just because something does have carbon as the backbone (ie. is an organic chemical) does not make it safe or for that matter good. So, it is better to not just asssume that just because something is "organic" that it is safe or perhaps even natural.

Take for instance, plastics; all organic. Very, simple organic molecules but, take thousands if not longer of years to break down. Look at ether, that's an organic chemical but, it is also a carcinogen.

Anyway, just trying to show (without using huge words) that not all organic compounds are good compounds.

The Helpful Gardener
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Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

Opa being who he is (scientist in training) uses the scientific version of the word organic. Often it means of biological processes, but that doesn't apply here either.

Sulfur has been used for years as fungicide but hey, DDT was used for years too! Neem is good, I have found an eight to one dilution of milk to work well (Wine growers are starting to use it for the same diseases). Compost tea does very nicely for low level fungus like that...

HG

grandpasrose
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Posts: 1651
Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2005 4:21 pm
Location: Quesnel, BC, Canada - Zone 4a

You can find the recipe for compost tea either in the Organic Forum or in the Rose Care Forum under Organic Rose Care. :wink:

Val
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

opabinia51
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Posts: 4659
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 9:58 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

Yes, Scott and I believe that you have also use classic definition of organic
:wink: and I don't really think that there is an adequate definition out there for organic in the gardening world. People tend to think of organic as being good for the environment, and just coincidentally, "organic techniques" just so happen to involve "Carbon compounds."

garden_mom
Senior Member
Posts: 105
Joined: Tue Mar 14, 2006 12:12 am
Location: Detroit, MI

Thanks for all of the advice. The ingredients read: Sulfur 52%, other ingredients: 48%, contains 6 lbs. sulfur per gallon. (The container is 16 ounces). It doesn't say what the other ingredients are. I ordered it from Gardens Alive! so I guess I will have to send it back for a credit. Somebody told me I should use horticultural oil and baking soda for the black spot. Does anyone know how to mix something like that, or if it's even accurate? Thanks again! :D

grandpasrose
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Posts: 1651
Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2005 4:21 pm
Location: Quesnel, BC, Canada - Zone 4a

The baking soda and horticultural oil recipe is normally used for powdery mildew, not blackspot, but this is the recipe:
- 4 teaspoons baking soda
- 1 tablespoon horticultural oil
- 1 gallon water
Mix and spray foliage lightly, including the undersides. Do not pour or spray this mix directly into the soil.

Another recipe that is supposed to treat both powdery mildew and blackspot is as follows:
- 4 teaspoons baking soda
- 1 tablespoon citrus oil
- 1 gallon water
Mix and spray foliage lightly, including the undersides. Do not pour or spray this mix directly into the soil.

Or you could just use a milk spray: Mix one part low fat milk with nine parts water and spray every five to seven days.

Or, as mentioned before, the neem oil works very well.

Hope these help! :wink:

Val
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

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