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Gandalph
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Mallsai ID

Please help to confirm. I think it's a Fukien Tea but the leaves are much thinner than the rest of my Fukiens.

Thanks in advance

[url=https://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=109&u=14761211][img]https://i66.servimg.com/u/f66/14/76/12/11/img_0110.jpg[/img][/url]

[url=https://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=110&u=14761211][img]https://i66.servimg.com/u/f66/14/76/12/11/img_0111.jpg[/img][/url]

[url=https://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=111&u=14761211][img]https://i66.servimg.com/u/f66/14/76/12/11/img_0112.jpg[/img][/url]

[url=https://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=112&u=14761211][img]https://i66.servimg.com/u/f66/14/76/12/11/img_0113.jpg[/img][/url]

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Gandalph
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Thanks to all who have viewed. It has been identified as Sageretia Theezans or Chinese Bird Plum.

Anyone here have any experience with these.

Thanks

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Gnome
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Gandalph,
Thanks to all who have viewed. It has been identified as Sageretia Theezans or Chinese Bird Plum.

Anyone here have any experience with these.

Thanks
No sorry I heve never owned one of these. Thank you for understanding that sometimes ID's can be difficult.

I know it's not much but have you seen this?

https://www.bonsai4me.com/SpeciesGuide/Sageretia.html

Norm

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Gandalph
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Thanks for the link Norm. I have already read it.

I'm now trying to find information on air layering it at the red line for a nice tree, and chopping it at the blue line for a nice shohin sumo to get rid of that horrible reverse taper.

Would appreciate any information anyone may have.

Thanks

[url=https://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=113&u=14761211][img]https://i66.servimg.com/u/f66/14/76/12/11/img_0114.jpg[/img][/url]

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bonsaiboy
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The wood on these trees is HARD. If you are going to cut the main trunk, you should probably use some heavy-duty cutting utensils, and if it looks messy in the end, you can always clean it up with a dremel or something similar.

And, as always, keep it humid where this tree is. Thin leaves dry out fast.
הדמיון הוא יותר חשוב מאשר ידע

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Gandalph
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bonsaiboy wrote:The wood on these trees is HARD. If you are going to cut the main trunk, you should probably use some heavy-duty cutting utensils, and if it looks messy in the end, you can always clean it up with a dremel or something similar.

And, as always, keep it humid where this tree is. Thin leaves dry out fast.
Thanks for the responses.
Anyone have any experience with air layering this species?

linlaoboo
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excited to see u got a bird plum as I do. I've not tried air layering on this but have stuck a few cuttings into the same pot and so far got one to bud out. So far I'm keeping this indoors in winter. Not sure if it needs dormancy or not. . .
ficus, maple, elm, juniper, pine

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froggy
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Hey, I am just air layering my first ficus (cross your fingers please), but i did a fair bit of reading up on it :)

one thing i read was that, if your tree has really hard wood (as was mentioned above) and grows slowly, air layering is done with a tight wire around the branch/trunk instead of a cut...

Maybe something worth looking at....
;)

Charles M
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Chinese Sweet Plum air layers pretty readily. You should keep this tree outdoors when weather is mild and bring it indoors when winter comes. Also keep a humidity tray nearby.

kdodds
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Ugh. Sagaretia... I don't know how much help my "help" will be, but IME, these really need a true greenhouse treatment. Too hot or too cold, too dry or too wet, and they go downhill REALLY fast. They're also HUGE bug/pathogen magnets. My best advice would be to try to keep humidity around 45-55%, room temperature of ~70ºF, in a south, west, or east facing window that does NOT get a draft. Like I said, I don't know how much help that will be, because I've tried them numerous times and failed each time. Then, I have a Serrisa for what, oh, 5 years now maybe, that hasn't done much, but hasn't died, so go figure.

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