Marsman
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They were throwing these away! (Eugenia)

Hey, it's mid-winter and I've got nothing to play with. All my trees are frozen in the back yard. So, I was at the market picking up something for din-din and I noticed the worker there was cleaning up the old Christmas stuff. She was going to throw these two plants out, and I asked if I could have them.

For free, they are great little plants for me to fool around with. They have nice taper anyway.

But, what are they? My wife thinks they are a type of boxwood. I thought they might be some kind of herb, but when I crush a leaf, I get no scent at all.

So, what's your best guess?

[img]https://i956.photobucket.com/albums/ae50/marsman61/Bonsai/DSC_0036.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i956.photobucket.com/albums/ae50/marsman61/Bonsai/DSC_0040.jpg[/img]
Last edited by Marsman on Mon Jan 25, 2010 6:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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rainbowgardener
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could it be rhododendron

https://www.dendroimage.de/3928.htm

possibly mountain laurel (kalmia)

https://www.poison.org/prevent/documents/plantImages/mtlaurel.jpg

anyway some kind of broadleaf evergreen

(pieris japonica, daphne, camellia, oleander, none of them looked exactly right, but something in this range)

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djlen
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I'm no expert on holly, but could they be in that genre?
Great find, btw!!!! :clap:
Regards,
Len

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rainbowgardener
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holly usually always has jagged leaves with points, like these:

[img]https://community.adn.com/sites/community.adn.com/files/images/HollyHistory_0.preview.JPG[/img]

but agree with you, that it is a nice looking shrub

Marsman
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Thanks for the comments. Whatever they are, I have a matching pair.

Marsman
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Darn it! My wife has snagged the trees from me. She likes them as they are and wants to keep them 'as is' for Valentine's Day decorations. (They are in pretty red tin outer pots, plastic pots inside.) So, I guess I'll have to wait a bit before I can play with them. :?

Rosaelyn
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hehehe Well, the good part is, Valentine's Day will be over in plenty of time to start fiddling in the spring. ;)
Rosaelyn @}>---'---,---

If you would know strength and patience, welcome the company of trees. ~ Hal Borland

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djlen
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rainbowgardener wrote:holly usually always has jagged leaves with points, like these:

[img]https://community.adn.com/sites/community.adn.com/files/images/HollyHistory_0.preview.JPG[/img]

but agree with you, that it is a nice looking shrub
Rainbowgardener - have you not seen Japanese Holly? Oval leaves with no points at all. I just have a feeling that this is some type of Holly.
Regards,
Len

"As the twig is bent, so the tree inclines"
- Virgil
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- Len
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Victrinia Ridgeway
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Len you are definitely on to something. I am trying to id the sub-type... but I agree... def ilex.... now ilex what... that is the question. :P
La belle cose prendono tempo... (Beautiful things take time...)

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applestar
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I. glabra?

Victrinia Ridgeway
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If you aren't scorching hot I'll be horn swaggled. I think that may be it. I wish there was some mature foliage on the plants in question, because clearly there is a differentiation in the foliage between young and mature. Good lead though!
La belle cose prendono tempo... (Beautiful things take time...)

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I. verticillata, I. rotundifolia, I. pedunculosa, I. coriacea, I. cassine, I. purpurea, many of the I. cornuta cultivars... can't tell hollies from pointy leaves, RBG...

That said I don't think it is a holly either. My first guess is [url=https://www.plantoftheweek.org/week125.shtml]Myrtis communis[/url] or common myrtle, a fairly common topiary plant. My second guess is [url=https://www.denverplants.com/foliage/html/Eugenia.htm]Eugenia myrtifolia[/url], the closely related Australian brush cherry (the name means looks like myrtle). One or the other...

HG
Last edited by The Helpful Gardener on Fri Jan 08, 2010 8:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Scott Reil

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I think we have it folks.

Eugenia Syzygium Paniculatum, or Brush Cherry [url]https://www.bonsai-bci.com/species/eugenia.html[/url]

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Leaves are too narrow and pointed to be E. paniculata. If it's Eugenia, (which your clue about no scent makes me think it might well be; myrtle has a distinct, sweet scent), it's E. myrtifolium. But both are in the myrtle family...

To be precise... :wink:

HG
Scott Reil

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Marsman wrote:I think we have it folks.

Eugenia Syzygium Paniculatum, or Brush Cherry [url]https://www.bonsai-bci.com/species/eugenia.html[/url]
Dude... there were no pictars in your link. :P lol
La belle cose prendono tempo... (Beautiful things take time...)

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Here's what I'm talking about, Vic...

[url=https://genzor.net/osc/images/Eugenia%20myrtifolia.jpg]E. myrtifolia[/url]

See how pointed the leaf is?

[url=https://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=431987]E. paniculata[/url]

See how much fuller the leaf is?

But it's a big genus, could be others as well...

Looks suspiciously like this [url=https://www.fourbsnursery.com/Globulus_1.htm]E. globulus compacta topes[/url] too. A LOT like actually... same sort of density, same dark color. And this guy is in the tope biz, as well. Betcha this is our real culprit...

HG
Scott Reil

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djlen
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Marsman wrote:I think we have it folks.

Eugenia Syzygium Paniculatum, or Brush Cherry [url]https://www.bonsai-bci.com/species/eugenia.html[/url]
I'm having second thoughts here. Check this page:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/Syzygium_paniculatum.htm
Looks like your plant but they say it's tropical. You had yours outside didn't you?

Okay, this one says it's hardy to 25°F for short durations:
https://www.smgrowers.com/products/plants/plantdisplay.asp?plant_id=1527
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Len

"As the twig is bent, so the tree inclines"
- Virgil
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- Len
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Marsman
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Update!

I pulled the trees out of the red tin pots to work on them a bit this weekend. They were in plastic pots inside the tin ones. Well, lo and behold, there is a sticker on the plastic pot that reads "Eugenia".

So, our mystery is solved.

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djlen
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If you mentioned it I missed it. I'm curious as to how tall your Bush Cherries are.
I'm soooooooo jealous!!
Regards,
Len

"As the twig is bent, so the tree inclines"
- Virgil
"I rarely agree with most of what I say........." -
- Len
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Marsman
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In the pots, they are about 2.5 feet tall. I'll take a better picture of them with something next to them for perspective.

The Helpful Gardener
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Only the genus part of the mystery is solved; the species remains in question...

HG
Scott Reil

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Here they are, in all their glory. One on left is not showing its best side.

[url=https://s956.photobucket.com/albums/ae50/marsman61/Bonsai/?action=view&current=8c5ca9d4.jpg][img]https://i956.photobucket.com/albums/ae50/marsman61/Bonsai/th_8c5ca9d4.jpg[/img][/url]

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djlen
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Marsman wrote:Here they are, in all their glory. One on left is not showing its best side.

[url=https://s956.photobucket.com/albums/ae50/marsman61/Bonsai/?action=view&current=8c5ca9d4.jpg][img]https://i956.photobucket.com/albums/ae50/marsman61/Bonsai/th_8c5ca9d4.jpg[/img][/url]
Ohhhhh.................................now your teasing!!!!!!!!
djlen is soooooooooooooooooooo jealous!!!!!!!!!!
Regards,
Len

"As the twig is bent, so the tree inclines"
- Virgil
"I rarely agree with most of what I say........." -
- Len
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Marsman
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Trade one for a stone pine. :wink:

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