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hendi_alex
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I only started using horse manure about 3 years ago, as a source became easily available. Prior to that I used leaves, grass clippings, table scraps, layered with sandy soil from the yard. My compost looks slightly better with the manure added but only slightly so IMO. Your method will work fine and fits very nicely with my keep it simple style. The components may not break down as fast as you would like, but be patient and just keep adding the organic matter to the pile. Given your restricted area, you may want to consider one of those tumblers to contain the compost and to help accelerate the decomposition. Is not necessary but may be desireable in your situation.
Last edited by hendi_alex on Thu Jul 24, 2008 2:43 am, edited 1 time in total.

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

andywph wrote:Well I do not have any access to manure.
And cause I live in a high rise flat (HDB), I do not have a yard of my own.
Hmm. In that case, I suggest you check out the thread on [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=8095]EM1 and Bokashi[/url]

andywph
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Location: singapore

Noted your suggestions.

Will do further research to see which fits better into my flat.

Thanks. :)

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smokensqueal
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depending on how big you want to build your compost you can always go to your local grocery stores and ask for any bad fruits and veggies or go to your coffee shop and get their used coffee grounds. That will add lots of greens to your compost. Then you need to find some browns like leaves from the park or some straw or straw like matterial (I'm not sure what you have over there) or even cardboard (the brown dull looking stuff not shiny and slick) or junk mail. But basicly a lot of people and stores throw out good things that can be composted.

andywph
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Location: singapore

Dear Smokensqueal

We don't have straw in singapore. Unless I buy those used for rabbits.

When you refer to junk mail, does it mean those normal paper? If it is, can I use recycled paper with ink on it?

I will try and ask around and see if the shops are willing to provide me with the "greens".

Thanks again. :)
Last edited by andywph on Sat Jul 26, 2008 2:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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smokensqueal
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You will get different answers about junk mail and what can be used. I look at house hold paper in a few different levels.

1. brown paper. That could be thin cardboard brown paper bags and sometimes there are even brown napkins. I see those as being the best and the first option in using if in need of "browns" because the chance that they have been bleached or chemicaly altered are slim.

2. gray paper. That to me is things like newspapers and paper towels. If you use newspaper it's best to use the ones that have soy base or water based ink. They may use something a little different in singapore but you want something that has a natural base ink if possible. And the paper towels are usually fine becaue they have a cotten in them which is good. But don't throw in paper towels if you used them with cleaners.

3. White paper. A number of people use this. I will only use it if I'm in great need of browns. This consists of your typical junk mail. Make sure there is no plastic in it and that includes the window in the envelope and shread it. The reason I don't like to use it is because the paper has typically been bleached and who knows what else and the ink is hard to tell what that's made from. I typically recycle this instead of using it in compost.

Actually you should proabaly shred and or tear up any paper you throw in your compost.

And about the staw. I think it's fine and mabye others have something better to say about it but if you can find some one with those rabbits that has used straw I would think that would be fine. Rabbits aren't meat eaters so I think their used straw would be find for compost. I probably wouldn't go out and buy it unless you are in great need of browns.

andywph
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Location: singapore

Dear Smokensqueal,

Well I guess I have gray and white paper then.

Thanks for the details. :)

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