GuppyGardener
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Posts: 13
Joined: Wed Apr 02, 2014 1:08 am
Location: Zone 5

Coldframe Vermicomposting

Hello all!

I plan on starting a red worm colony this summer for next years soil needs and I have been brainstorming the issue of overwintering a large colony. I do not know if anyone else does this but I though it just might be possible. Do any of you think a large coldframe would be a good home for an outdoor vermicomposting colony? Please share your thoughts:)
-George

valley
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Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2012 6:25 am
Location: ranches in sierra nevada mountains California & Navada high desert

Re: Coldframe Vermicomposting

I've brought worms from down by the river up to our garden, the ground freezes here, worms can go deeper to overwinter.

If your cold frame has no bottom they will have no problem going deep enough to be safe. Moles however can burrow in to eat them. You can keep them in a plastic tub in the house also.

Several people here on the forum keep worms, some keep them in the house during winter, depending on the weather, I'm sure.

Richard

tomc
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Location: SE-OH USA Zone 6-A

Re: Coldframe Vermicomposting

I built a covered two-bin compost in Monadnock region in NH. If you add enough manure and leaves to each bin (I added a 30 gallon barrel of each monthly) November to April I kept the bins with composting worms alive.

The will seriously slow down January & Feburary, but survive.

If you are vermicomposting in a snowy district covered bins are not a luxury. They are inherently about 15° F warmer.
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GuppyGardener
Full Member
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed Apr 02, 2014 1:08 am
Location: Zone 5

Re: Coldframe Vermicomposting

I'm thinking of permanently keeping the colony in the cold frame even through the summer. Do you think they will have any ventilation issues?
-George

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