Bobberman
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Chemical and compost reaction mixed!

When cement is made there is a chemical reaction! Plaster paris gives off heat when water is added! It takes heat to make a compost work better so is there a chemical and a bacterial reaction happening or can we make it happen? Wjhat I am getting at is a way to make a heat pad for starting seeds. The heat pad has to give off heat for at least 10 days and heat up to anywhere from 80 to a 100 I would think!? If you put a hand warmer into a plastic bag it can be reused as soon as it hits the air! again!
I enjoy fishing ,gardening and a solar greenhouse! carpet installation repair and sales for over 45 years! I am the inventor of the Bobber With A Brain - Fishing Bobber!

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gixxerific
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80 - 100 is awfully hot for germination. Yo could just use a heating pad for your back set on low. Or a real cheap way to heat a small area is to use a regular light bulb they give off enough heat to do what you are trying to do.

As far as the heat in a compost that is from the bacteria etc in there doing there work. Eating dying and so forth. They make heat some what like you do when exercising. If you wanted get5 a pile to heat up after cooling down you have to replenish the food source and add oxygen to get them little critters doing their thing again. Normally a high nitrogen source is good to jumpstart a pile.

Bobberman
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gixxerific wrote:80 - 100 is awfully hot for germination. Yo could just use a heating pad for your back set on low. Or a real cheap way to heat a small area is to use a regular light bulb they give off enough heat to do what you are trying to do.

As far as the heat in a compost that is from the bacteria etc in there doing there work. Eating dying and so forth. They make heat some what like you do when exercising. If you wanted get5 a pile to heat up after cooling down you have to replenish the food source and add oxygen to get them little critters doing their thing again. Normally a high nitrogen source is good to jumpstart a pile.
+++ My point here is that the heat pad would heat up to 80 to 100 not the box with the seeds! When i have 50 seperate boxes in my greenhouse there is no cheap heat to use for the heat pad because I need so many! If I had heat in my green house I would not have a problem but the night temp is very low with a solar green house in feb and march in Pa. Once the seeds ae started for about 2 weeks thy seem to grow ok even at the low 30's! at night!
I enjoy fishing ,gardening and a solar greenhouse! carpet installation repair and sales for over 45 years! I am the inventor of the Bobber With A Brain - Fishing Bobber!

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farmerlon
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Re: Chemical and compost reaction mixed!

Bobberman wrote:When cement is made there is a chemical reaction! Plaster paris gives off heat when water is added! It takes heat to make a compost work better so is there a chemical and a bacterial reaction happening or can we make it happen? ...
It's the "respiration" of the microorganisms that makes the heat in a compost pile. In my opinion, I think there are too many variables, and too much effort involved, in trying to consistently use "working" compost as a "heat mat" for seed starting.
You may certainly prove me wrong, but it seems like too much effort to me.

I start all of my transplants in the house, and have not found the need for supplemental heat ... and I keep my home thermostat set pretty low. :D
One of those plastic or metal storage shelf units that you can pick up at any hardware store, has a small "footprint" (takes up very little floor space) but gives you lots of room for starting seeds and growing transplants.

I am making an assumption here, but (to everyone) I say, get that stuff out of your cold garages, basements, and greenhouses... and use the heat that you're already paying for in your house . :D

Lunacy
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I also use the heat of my house to germinate seeds, a fifty cell tray takes up very little space. My girlfriend wouldn't let my worms stay even on the service porch, but she has no problem with seedlings.

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