blah1234
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Will this work in an ACT?

I am embarking on a schedule to help improve my lawns with weekly doses of ACT until the cold arrives around Halloween.

I went to the local hydroponic store to buy some Alaskan Humus, but they were out.

I decided to use a bag of Just Right Potting Soil in the meantime.

Image

Here is the link to the product page:

https://ssl.cgicafe.com/clients/hmoonhy ... _xtra.html

The page contains a pretty good description of the contents.

What does everybody think? Will it work or am I wasting my time with this product?

Thanks!

toxcrusadr
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Stumped on the ACT acronym...

Which may mean I'm not qualified to answer your question anyway. :lol:
Tox

blah1234
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Here is the description of Just Right:

https://ssl.cgicafe.com/clients/hmoonhy ... _xtra.html

"Bags of Biologyâ„¢"

Items with a are from:

* 1st -we use a Cocotek coconut coir, high quality, low sodium, media. This coir is the backbone to our more diverse and less compacted mix, allowing textural uniformity. Allowing Just Right to taylor make finer or coarser, fibre consistencies. This composite mix consists of millions of capillary micro-sponges per unit volume, that absorbs up to eight times the mixes oven dried weight in water. Our mix has a natural affinity to hold a 3 : 7 air to water stoichiometric ratio. Which assures you that Just Right will hold plant nutrition naturally until the microporosity releases oxygenated nutrient solution over extended periods allowing reduced watering frequency.

* 2nd we add Ancient Biology from Ancient Forest Alaskan Humus which is an ultra-pure, ultra-organic "compilation" resulting from a very gradual collaboration between Mother Nature and Father Time. The unique and highly prized, Alaska Humus is the byproduct of patients and good fortune, resulting from nearly 10,000 years of post ice-age, real-time, decomposition performed by the life processes of vast numbers and species of microbes throughout Alaska's annual cycles of long, dark winters and extremely daylight-intensive summers. Because of its incredible microbiological diversity (an estimated 35,000 species of bacteria and 5000 species of fungi) -- unlike manufactured commercial compost -there is a guaranteed absence of any human pathogens, synthetic chemical impurities from foreign residues.

* 3rd Our Earth worm castings from Worm power here in Avon, NY. These are the best quality castings we have ever seen.

* 4th Diatomite (Diatomaceous Earth or "DE") is a sedimentary rock primarily composed of the fossilized remains of unicellular fresh water microbes known as Diatoms. Sedimentary stratification over the millennia has compressed the reminants of these diatoms.

This aggregation creates one of the most effective growing media components, available. Diatomite consists of approximately 86% silica, 3% magnesium and 2% iron., with the remainder of its contents being mineral compounds; which are complementary to plant growth. All of these unique factors make Diatomite the definitive horticultural grade growing medium.

High Silica Content - In nature, Silica is conducive to healthy plant and root development. Because Diatomite is 86% silica, your plants will receive a continual slow release of silica, assisting wtth the growth of healthier, more robust plants. Absorbency & Porosity - Diatomite is naturally very porous, and can hold 150% of its weight in water. The Silica Content, natural Absorbency, and Porous qualities result in a slow release of water and nutrients to your plants, contributing to higher yields and less watering frequency.

Capillary Action & Lateral movement - The porosity of the Diatomite contributes to its ability to wick water. Diatomite causes water and its dissolved nutrients to move laterally throughout the medium, making Diatomite ideal for hydroponics. The media achieves an excellent air to water ratio in the pot.

Proper aeration is a particularly important quality which helps gardeners avoid root rot. Silica stone can be used as a beneficial supplement to expanded clay, Rockwool, coco peat, and other mediums depending on the application.

* Next Subculture M: a mycorhizae root inoculant that contains a wide diversity of endo and ecto mycorrhizal fungi that colonize plant roots. Subculture M allows for known beneficial fungi to find a place to reside around the root zones of plants.

* Now Subculture B: is a probiotic inoculum of beneficial microorganisms that will help increase the vitality and yield in all plants. Microbes in Subculture B will attach themselves to root zones dramatically affecting plant performance in positive ways.

Natural Organic Sulfate of Potash is natural potash mineral contains 51 percent potash 18 percent sulfur. It also contains trace amounts of calcium and magnesium. Potassium is frequently the most abundant Major element in plant nutrition.

Organic Bone Char contains more than 16% available phosphate (P2O5) and 32% total phosphate.

Rare Earth: is derived from ancient seabed deposits of prophylactic clay that is blended with fulvate ore.

Our ph in this mix is 7.01 which are perfect to keep the bacteria and fungi from destroying or decomposing. There is no need for adjustment of your pH of any nutrient you add to this mix.

We suggest no nutrients for a couple weeks. When you wet this mix with de chlorinated water the runoff will be around 1300ppm which is hot and will aid in Germination of any seeds or cuttings.

blah1234
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ACT is Aerated Compost Tea

ACT stands for Aerated Compost Tea.

See the stickies at the top of page 1 of the Compost Forum.

Toil
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Well, there's a reason they don't call it APST (aerated potting soil tea).


Set up a worm bin or get a pile going, or both. You won't regret it!
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gixxerific
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I, as Soil said, would rather go with good old fashioned backyard compost/vermicompost. The bagged stuff probably wouldn't hurt to add as a supplement but it is bagged and sealed lacking oxygen which is what the beneficial bacteria need to live, who knows what ever that bag has gone through. You might not get a good culture from the bagged goodies but you will from your own compost.

Again check out the ACT thread. :wink:

blah1234
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gixxerific wrote:I, as Soil said, would rather go with good old fashioned backyard compost/vermicompost. The bagged stuff probably wouldn't hurt to add as a supplement but it is bagged and sealed lacking oxygen which is what the beneficial bacteria need to live, who knows what ever that bag has gone through. You might not get a good culture from the bagged goodies but you will from your own compost.

Again check out the ACT thread. :wink:
Already have, several times... My compost isn't ready yet, and may not be ready until next spring.

Unfortunately, I have everything except the compost... Here's my recipe for each 5 gallon bucket:

2 cups of that potting soil
1/3 cup molasses (5 Tbsp = 1/3 cup)
1/3 cup liquid seaweed
1 cup coffee grounds

Aerated for 24 hours with the big ActiveAqua pump (8 outlets x 138 gal/hr)


Thought about going the guano route, but HG discourages it.

The hydroponic store did have a bag of earthworm casings. And the alaska humus is back in stock. Maybe I'll buy those and put 1 cup of the humus and 1 cup of the earthworm casings instead.

Then I'll throw the rest of the potting soil into the compost pile..

Toil
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that's a lot of molasses. How much water are you using and what temp?


I'm not taking a position either way, but Dr. Ingham has said it's ok to use unfinished compost. That potting soil write-up, by the way, does not tell you how much compost is in it. ACT recipes tell you how much compost to use. Where did the two cups of potting soil measure come from?

Bad ACT can not be distinguished from good ACT without a microscope. That's why people stick to the recipe.

Your best bet is doing things right from the start, with some patience and some compost.
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